Canon EOS R Mark II in testing [CR2]

sportskjutaren

Pro sports photographer
Did Sony listen for upgrading the A9 to A9II?
...
Thanks for Your reply!

Sony truly listened to the very specific group that the camera is designed for.
Agency photographers with a need to transfer images straight from the camera as quickly as possible.

Those photographers don't really need higher resolution.
But they need the possibility to "voice tag" images.
And they need the possibility to transfer images via FTP as fast as possible.

Therefore the upgrades for both wired and wireless internet connection are a big deal to these photographers.
(I write the above out of my own experience).
I´m honestly happy that Sony didn't increase resolution.
It would only slow down my work, pretty much with any upside to it.
(I do appreciate that for a whole lot of photographers the difference between the A9 and the A9 II is not as big as it is for me and others.)

When it comes to sensors.
I generally think that modern sensors overall are amazing.
No matter the brand on the camera.
And in real-world usage, it´s pretty much impossible to see the difference between different sensors.

If anybody here wants to get a deeper understanding of sports photography at the very highest level.
I can truly recommend watching this:
 

AlanF

Canon 5DSR II
Aug 16, 2012
5,980
3,649
Thanks for Your reply!

Sony truly listened to the very specific group that the camera is designed for.
Agency photographers with a need to transfer images straight from the camera as quickly as possible.

Those photographers don't really need higher resolution.
But they need the possibility to "voice tag" images.
And they need the possibility to transfer images via FTP as fast as possible.

Therefore the upgrades for both wired and wireless internet connection are a big deal to these photographers.
(I write the above out of my own experience).
I´m honestly happy that Sony didn't increase resolution.
It would only slow down my work, pretty much with any upside to it.
(I do appreciate that for a whole lot of photographers the difference between the A9 and the A9 II is not as big as it is for me and others.)

When it comes to sensors.
I generally think that modern sensors overall are amazing.
No matter the brand on the camera.
And in real-world usage, it´s pretty much impossible to see the difference between different sensors.

If anybody here wants to get a deeper understanding of sports photography at the very highest level.
I can truly recommend watching this:
I have heard that from other sports photographers.
 
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StoicalEtcher

EOS RP
Jan 3, 2018
208
112
Yorkshire
The response from the CPS rep was not to listen in order to understand why this would make a difference.
Instead the answer was that the software in the camera is really complicated.
I.E. nothing that i should hope for. (And it has still not been implemented by Canon).

I like to compare that to all the software updated that been done on the A9.
All after Sony listening to feedback from photographers on different events.
And the changes from the A9 to the A9 II.

I do honestly hope that Canon will catch up in this area.
From my honest experience, they have a lot to improve in this area.
And Canon is still most welcome to contact me. For my honest opinion.
As long as they will listen carefully & with respect. I´m all open to help them improve.
Fair enough - it seems from your experience that Sony are doing a good job listening at these events then.

(For what it is worth, whilst I obviously can't comment on your specifics, I suspect a CPS rep is not always the right person - needs to be a design /engineering research guy/girl - that said, any CPS rep should also be courteous and be absorbing feedback received to then pass on).

Happy shooting - and hope you're back on the sporting touchlines soon :D
 
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Del Paso

M3 Singlestroke
Aug 9, 2018
639
648
The problem isn't wanting two card slots. The problem is with people saying two card slots differentiate a dual card camera as "pro" from one with just one slot. They take the shooter completely out of the equation and that smacks of gear snobbery... even though old pro 35mm film shooters only used on film roll. Two card slots do not make one a professional. Some want it. Some couldn't care less. However, saying two cards slots make a camera a professional camera is just plain stupid. There is no such thing as a pro camera, just pro photographers. Problem is, enthusiast outnumber pro shooters by a a long shot. The pros just happen to be more vocal because of ego. Redundancy is nice to have, but it doesn't make the shooter any better at anything. Same bad or good shooter no matter what.
I do agree!
Leica's digital M cameras have only one card-slot, and yet, are used by many excellent pros (Sebastiao Salgado, for instance).
I also prefer 2 card-slots, but this feature wouldn't make me a better photographer...
 

juststeve

EOS M50
Nov 29, 2018
31
38
Canon sometimes listens to those in the field. Way back when anyway.

In the early years of EOS (film) I was doing an art show in MT when a very senior Canon rep (in charge of pretty much west of the Mississippi) came by my booth with a VERY VIP from Canon mothership. I had just received my 600/4 L and really had not had a chance to use it in the field. The VERY VIP asked me, with the senior rep's help, if I had suggestions for improvements.

I replied I thought there could be control points on a bigger telephotos, pointing out the right hand all these control points but the left hand had nothing to do but hold the lens. I suggested customizable control points on the lens, much like the current great white lens buttons. It took a while, but my 400/2.8 L IS of 1999 had those very lens buttons, as did the other great whites.

If Canon is listening or reading now, one improvement I would like to see is a customizable button, a very, very convenient button, which could kick in or kick out auto bracketing. One push either enables or cuts. A hold down allows a person to change parameters, number of shots and spacing of brackets. With modern sensors, even Canon's, I find I usually need one bracket to ensure a quality print. But when the going gets tough, it would be nice to have the ability to switch to more brackets and be able to very the spacing. Of course, all of this has to be possible to do with eye at the eyepiece and in a couple of seconds.
 
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Michael Clark

Now we see through a glass, darkly...
Apr 5, 2016
1,241
626
Please share the extra $200 promo, I'm not seeing it
The EOS R is currently listed at $1,499 at B&H. The other $200 discount is obtained by entering a 19-digit Promo code at checkout. The promo code was included in a promotional email they sent out on Thursday, December 12. If you weren't signed up to get their promotional e-mails on that date, you're probably out of luck.

Since it is 19 digits long, I can only surmise that each e-mail recipient got a unique code, so I am not going to publish the one they sent me. If several folks try to use it at the same time, I might get banished from B&H...

In my original reply here (which I edited by adding all of the above info), I was looking at the 5D mark IV: It appears one of the Canon $300 discounts has expired. It's showing at $1,999 on B&H and you get an additional $200 discount by entering a unique discount code they sent you in a recent promotional e-mail.
 
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Michael Clark

Now we see through a glass, darkly...
Apr 5, 2016
1,241
626
The problem isn't wanting two card slots. The problem is with people saying two card slots differentiate a dual card camera as "pro" from one with just one slot. They take the shooter completely out of the equation and that smacks of gear snobbery... even though old pro 35mm film shooters only used on film roll. Two card slots do not make one a professional. Some want it. Some couldn't care less. However, saying two cards slots make a camera a professional camera is just plain stupid. There is no such thing as a pro camera, just pro photographers. Problem is, enthusiast outnumber pro shooters by a a long shot. The pros just happen to be more vocal because of ego. Redundancy is nice to have, but it doesn't make the shooter any better at anything. Same bad or good shooter no matter what.
Back in the days of film, many pros *did* shoot with two different bodies on critical assignments. Part of it was for the ability to quickly go from one lens to another (zooms were not so great back then and most pros shot with primes most of the time), but another part of it was to have different types of film loaded in each body.

 
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VICYASA

I'm New Here
Dec 15, 2019
12
2
Beginner in photography here... a few questions:
The next potential version of this camera likely to be geared for pros? What's the price point likely to be based on speculation surrounding this next iteration? And when's the potential release of v.2 of this piece? Thanks in advance... help a newbie in the Canon world out.
Thanks
 

Michael Clark

Now we see through a glass, darkly...
Apr 5, 2016
1,241
626
Thanks for Your reply!

Sony truly listened to the very specific group that the camera is designed for.
Agency photographers with a need to transfer images straight from the camera as quickly as possible.

Those photographers don't really need higher resolution.
But they need the possibility to "voice tag" images.
And they need the possibility to transfer images via FTP as fast as possible.

Therefore the upgrades for both wired and wireless internet connection are a big deal to these photographers.
(I write the above out of my own experience).
I´m honestly happy that Sony didn't increase resolution.
It would only slow down my work, pretty much with any upside to it.
(I do appreciate that for a whole lot of photographers the difference between the A9 and the A9 II is not as big as it is for me and others.)

When it comes to sensors.
I generally think that modern sensors overall are amazing.
No matter the brand on the camera.
And in real-world usage, it´s pretty much impossible to see the difference between different sensors.

If anybody here wants to get a deeper understanding of sports photography at the very highest level.
I can truly recommend watching this:
Haven't Canon 1-Series cameras been equipped with voice tagging for well over a decade?
Aren't Canon EOS 1D X and 1D X Mark II bodies equipped with gigabit ethernet connectors to allow for wired FTP?
Haven't they had essentially the same capabilities (albeit at slower speeds constrained by the wireless protocols in use at the time, such as 802.11a/b/g/n) when attached to the optional Wireless File Transmitters?
 
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sportskjutaren

Pro sports photographer
Haven't Canon 1-Series cameras been equipped with voice tagging for well over a decade?
Aren't Canon EOS 1D X and 1D X Mark II bodies equipped with gigabit ethernet connectors to allow for wired FTP?
...
Thanks for Your reply!
It seems like You missed my point.

My point is that Canon has something to learn from Sony about active & humble listening.
And if the do that.
It will benefit all of us!


Have a good day :)
 

scyrene

EOS 5D MK IV
Dec 4, 2013
2,560
495
UK
www.flickr.com
Thanks for Your reply!
It seems like You missed my point.

My point is that Canon has something to learn from Sony about active & humble listening.
And if the do that.
It will benefit all of us!


Have a good day :)
Your photos are excellent to my untrained eye, and I can't speak to how Canon or Sony reps respond, as I've never had contact with either. But I would find it surprising if Canon didn't pay close attention to what professional users told them. Perhaps I'm reading too much into it, but the implication I draw from what you've been saying is, Canon just put stuff out there, whereas Sony listen and learn from feedback. I doubt very much Canon would have been as successful - especially with professionals - as they have been for so long if that were the case.
 

sportskjutaren

Pro sports photographer
Your photos are excellent to my untrained eye, and I can't speak to how Canon or Sony reps respond, as I've never had contact with either. But I would find it surprising if Canon didn't pay close attention to what professional users told them. Perhaps I'm reading too much into it, but the implication I draw from what you've been saying is, Canon just put stuff out there, whereas Sony listen and learn from feedback. I doubt very much Canon would have been as successful - especially with professionals - as they have been for so long if that were the case.
If you read my other post earlier in this discussion.
I think You will get a better understanding of what I actually want to say.
That is not that Canons doesn't listen at all.
But that can learn a whole lot from how Sony actively ask and listen to photographers.
To a much bigger degree than Canon.
From my very personal experience, there is actually a really big difference here.
And that it would benefit everybody if Canon got better at this.
 

Kit.

EOS 6D MK II
Apr 25, 2011
1,492
854
Thanks for Your reply!
It seems like You missed my point.

My point is that Canon has something to learn from Sony about active & humble listening.
And if the do that.
It will benefit all of us!
Maybe. But how do you know it's actually the case, that Sony listens to you and not just copies what Canon has done?
 
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Architect1776

Defining the poetics of space through Architecture
Aug 18, 2017
440
405
118
Williamsport, PA
If you read my other post earlier in this discussion.
I think You will get a better understanding of what I actually want to say.
That is not that Canons doesn't listen at all.
But that can learn a whole lot from how Sony actively ask and listen to photographers.
To a much bigger degree than Canon.
From my very personal experience, there is actually a really big difference here.
And that it would benefit everybody if Canon got better at this.
How do you know they do not actively talk to and listen to a lot of photographers? Do you have inside information on whom and the numbers?
 

sportskjutaren

Pro sports photographer
How do you know they do not actively talk to and listen to a lot of photographers? Do you have inside information on whom and the numbers?
I asked a CPS rep about how they work with this years ago.
(Wrote about that earlier in this discussion).

Maybe. But how do you know it's actually the case, that Sony listens to you and not just copies what Canon has done?
Because I submitted several suggestions myself.
After they asked me, and many others about what they can improve.
Actually more that one time.

At this point, I really don't think I can submit much more that actually would be constructive to this discussion.
So I wish all of You the very best!
 

juststeve

EOS M50
Nov 29, 2018
31
38
To some extent Canon has been trying for more feedback the past couple of years. If memory serves me correctly, at least twice within the past few years Canon has sent out very detailed email surveys to me about what I wanted to see in future cameras and problems I have faced with present ones. The surveys were many pages long.

Unfortunately, I never completed one as they got more and more intrusive into details I felt were none of Canon's bleeping business and if you did not answer all questions the submission of the survey was denied.

Up until recently, I had been a CPS member since the early '80s. I still use Canon cameras and lenses, I have had attractions to other systems, primarily the Nikon 850, but have not concluded the benefits of a new system outweigh the costs.
 

Kit.

EOS 6D MK II
Apr 25, 2011
1,492
854
Because I submitted several suggestions myself.
After they asked me, and many others about what they can improve.
Actually more that one time.
Same with me and Canon. If Canon implements my (quite obvious) suggestions in their future cameras, does that mean that they listen to me, or does that mean that my suggestions were quite obvious?
 
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Photo Hack

Hi there
Apr 8, 2019
144
186
Beginner in photography here... a few questions:
The next potential version of this camera likely to be geared for pros? What's the price point likely to be based on speculation surrounding this next iteration? And when's the potential release of v.2 of this piece? Thanks in advance... help a newbie in the Canon world out.
Thanks
There’s been a lot of posts about this speculation. The R right now is $1499 with adapter and extras from Adorama. It was released at like $2,299 just 18 months ago?

Best time to buy the R if that’s what your goal is and you’ll get your money back out of it when you decide to upgrade to the next version.

I would say the Mark II, based on rumors, would be released in the $2700-$3300 range depending on IBIS, new sensor tech, new processor, dual slots, etc. if it’s truly a 5D equivalent of 2020 I don’t see why it wouldn’t be in that range.

Essentially a lot of people think the R was a stop gap until they could come out with a better camera and the Mark II probably won’t resemble its classic version much.

I don’t think even the Sony boys can say this camera isn’t a great deal at $1499. It’s a very capable camera at that price point and the Mark II probably won’t ship until summer.
 
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Architect1776

Defining the poetics of space through Architecture
Aug 18, 2017
440
405
118
Williamsport, PA
I asked a CPS rep about how they work with this years ago.
(Wrote about that earlier in this discussion).



Because I submitted several suggestions myself.
After they asked me, and many others about what they can improve.
Actually more that one time.

At this point, I really don't think I can submit much more that actually would be constructive to this discussion.
So I wish all of You the very best!
Years ago is NOT today. From my understanding and reading they have changed from years ago.