Canon Introduces The CR-S700R Robotic Camera System Enabling The Remote Operation Of Select EOS Cameras And Lenses

Maximilian

The dark side - I've been there
Nov 7, 2013
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Germany
lovely!

Let the pros decide if it's usable to them.

As I am an amarteur and not into video I am out of judge.
 

privatebydesign

Would you take advice from a cartoons stuffed toy?
Jan 29, 2011
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It can be controlled wirelessly, I don't know the technology, again, I am not suggesting for a second it is a viable replacement for people who need the CR-S700R, all I am saying is we have similar capabilities within our control.

For instance, I can put my 1DX MkII on a Ronin-S and remotely zoom and frame (pan and tilt and even roll if desired) the camera and adjust all exposure controls including AF from 40 yards away, that is as far as I have set it up to do that so it might be longer. Indeed with Active Track, you can tell the gimbal what to track automatically, I don't believe the CR-S700R can do that.

Now in perspective, I did that from a comparatively short distance at a free concert as a proof of concept for myself. If I needed to do a similar thing to cover the Olympics with faster panning and image delivery and 100% reliability I'd rent the CR-S700R.

I don't see why that is so controversial, it is simply true.
 
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RunAndGun

EOS RP
Dec 16, 2011
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Can Ronin S zoom 100-400L II remotely?
If you put an 'FIZ motor' on it. The Canon would be controlling the zoom via an external servo, as well, since the still lenses do not contain built-in servos for zoom. Yes, it does look like the zoom servo is built into the arm that is part of the Canon, but it's still an external servo to the lens, none-the-less.

I'm not trying to say they are exactly the same thing or drawing exact parallels. I'm just saying it could be used in a similar manner, since someone said that you couldn't use the Ronis S to do what the Canon is doing. The Ronin S detaches from the battery/handle and can be mounted to other platforms and remotely controlled, just like other remote gimbal heads(i.e: Movi Pro, Ronin 2, etc., etc.). Pan, tilt, roll, zoom, focus, iris... The Canon is not ground breaking or revolutionary. Remote heads have been around for decades. Canon has just built their own turn-key solution that may have some above average or even evolutionary aspects, but they didn't just put a man on the moon.
 
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masterpix

EOS 80D
Jun 29, 2016
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Such tools will modify the way studio/sport photography into a more realistic yet very differnt views than we are used to. As drones modified the way we see (video) things, looking at things from a bird view which is totaly new for us "flatters", this will allow the photogerapher to see (and take pictures) in angles never seen before. Adding dramatic effects never thought of.

As for the coast, who needs it; will find it more profitable than a burden. Thoguh I think the most "expence" will be on learnig to control this thing and spending days in finding out how to make better and more interesting pictures.
 
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Kit.

EOR R
Apr 25, 2011
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It can be controlled wirelessly, I don't know the technology, again, I am not suggesting for a second it is a viable replacement for people who need the CR-S700R, all I am saying is we have similar capabilities within our control.
I just wonder if I can(*) write my own software to control Ronin-S wirelessly. So far, I could find no conclusive evidence of it on the Internet.

*) legally allowed and technically provided with a stable set of APIs.
 

Cochese

EOS 80D
Oct 22, 2014
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What can’t you do with a Ronin-S that you can do with this?

Remember the context of my comment, an affordable way to get the majority of the functionality.
The context of your comment was that your DJI was nearly as capable. But it isn't.
It's a great "handheld" gimble. But these are two different types of products. The Ronin, for instance, is not built specifically to be mounted down, solidly to platform and operated remotely.
The only zooming functionality it has is by using the focus motor, which, (I could be wrong, I never try, when I rend one), can't be used at the same time as manual focus. It's an aftermarket thought for a lightweight product built to be held in the hand, not mounted to a ceiling, or strung together in a series and commanded from a remote unit.

You're getting weirdly defensive over different products in entirely different market segments.
 

RunAndGun

EOS RP
Dec 16, 2011
343
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The context of your comment was that your DJI was nearly as capable. But it isn't.
It's a great "handheld" gimble. But these are two different types of products. The Ronin, for instance, is not built specifically to be mounted down, solidly to platform and operated remotely.
The only zooming functionality it has is by using the focus motor, which, (I could be wrong, I never try, when I rend one), can't be used at the same time as manual focus. It's an aftermarket thought for a lightweight product built to be held in the hand, not mounted to a ceiling, or strung together in a series and commanded from a remote unit.

You're getting weirdly defensive over different products in entirely different market segments.
It posses that ability, just like it’s bigger brother and other gimbals, as I and others stated in previous posts. Is that the way most people use it? No. The majority are using It handheld, but it is not limited to only that use.
 

privatebydesign

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Jan 29, 2011
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The context of your comment was that your DJI was nearly as capable. But it isn't.
It's a great "handheld" gimble. But these are two different types of products. The Ronin, for instance, is not built specifically to be mounted down, solidly to platform and operated remotely.
The only zooming functionality it has is by using the focus motor, which, (I could be wrong, I never try, when I rend one), can't be used at the same time as manual focus. It's an aftermarket thought for a lightweight product built to be held in the hand, not mounted to a ceiling, or strung together in a series and commanded from a remote unit.

You're getting weirdly defensive over different products in entirely different market segments.
No that was not the context of my original comment.

The Ronin-S is designed to be solidly mounted, it has both 1/4 20 and a 3/8 16 threads on the bottom, these are the industry standard, clearly you don't own or use a Ronin-S.

Again, the feature set is different but comparable enough to be considered as offering similar enough functionality for a fraction of the price for anybody that has the need but not the budget. Further, I have never said one is a direct replacement for another and I am not being defensive any more than you are being obtuse. Yes they are different products in different market segments but for those on a budget you can get 90% of the functionality of the Canon product for a lot less money, that is, you can remotely control a camera's framing and have full control over many of the camera and lenses functions while seeing the view through the camera remotely. That is not controversial and it is accurate, and anybody that doesn't accept that is being weirdly defensive.
 

privatebydesign

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Jan 29, 2011
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It posses that ability, just like it’s bigger brother and other gimbals, as I and others stated in previous posts. Is that the way most people use it? No. The majority are using It handheld, but it is not limited to only that use.
Indeed, and some of it's many features are designed to be used primarily on a tripod/fixed support. Active Track, Panning Time-lapse, Force Mobile etc are all designed to be used with the gimbal firmly mounted on a tripod.
 

RunAndGun

EOS RP
Dec 16, 2011
343
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Indeed, and some of it's many features are designed to be used primarily on a tripod/fixed support. Active Track, Panning Time-lapse, Force Mobile etc are all designed to be used with the gimbal firmly mounted on a tripod.
I haven't tried the Force Mobile with any of the dedicated controllers, but even with just using a cell phone and it's motion sensors, it's pretty incredible. Especially when you look at its cost. And then the Active Track, too.. All-in-all, what you get in a sub $800 package is insane, especially for those of us that have been doing this for a few decades and remember what equipment with some of these capabilities used to cost, not that long ago.
 

Cochese

EOS 80D
Oct 22, 2014
130
62
No that was not the context of my original comment.

The Ronin-S is designed to be solidly mounted, it has both 1/4 20 and a 3/8 16 threads on the bottom, these are the industry standard, clearly you don't own or use a Ronin-S.

Again, the feature set is different but comparable enough to be considered as offering similar enough functionality for a fraction of the price for anybody that has the need but not the budget. Further, I have never said one is a direct replacement for another and I am not being defensive any more than you are being obtuse. Yes they are different products in different market segments but for those on a budget you can get 90% of the functionality of the Canon product for a lot less money, that is, you can remotely control a camera's framing and have full control over many of the camera and lenses functions while seeing the view through the camera remotely. That is not controversial and it is accurate, and anybody that doesn't accept that is being weirdly defensive.
These are different tools meant for different job. The customer overlap is probably going to be marginal. The Ronin-S is great for what it's specifically designed for. I've rented it for star tracking shots in Michigan's UP on various occasions and it did okay. Not exactly the most confidence I've had in a product, but it did it's job fine enough that I'd probably use it again.
But just looking at the two solutions, they are clearly not the same kind of beast with the same kind of goals.
 

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LDS

EOR R
Sep 14, 2012
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it has both 1/4 20 and a 3/8 16 threads on the bottom,
I don't think the Canon is designed to be mounted on a standard tripod... if it's capable of fast movements and change of directions (i.e. to follow sport events) I think it will require a very sturdy attachment to cope with the torque.

Nor probably is battery powered and I guess it requires a separate power supply - which makes sense when an event can last hours and that is put in a difficult to reach position.