Canon is gearing up for a big 2020 [CR2]

sdz

EOS RP
Sep 13, 2016
237
139
Pittsburgh, PA
It's here and it's called "R." If you want something different, you may be in for a wait.
I suspect the R II will be the true 5x replacement. This camera would need the new sensor platform to combine dual or quad pixel AF with high FPS rates. We shall see sometime next year.
 
Aug 22, 2010
1,622
319
49
Uk
www.GMCPhotographics.co.uk
Canon may very well have a big 2020, but unfortunately for me, part of their big 2020 will not include bring out a Pro-mirrorless body. This is what I am waiting for. For me mirrorless brings so many good things to my way of shooting that I will likely not be purchasing another DSLR. So, wait I will for the pro-mirrorless. Who knows, maybe Canon will surprise me and get a high fps, Continuous AF, with 30 or 30+MP mirrorless out in 2020.
The thing is, our expectations and desires are ahead of the market curve. It's easy for us to say I want XYZ, but it takes a while for products to get from development into customer's hands.
For a long long while, what I wanted from a digital camera just wasn't available until the original 5D was released....even then it wasn't until the 5DIII came along a lot later which was the camera I really wanted back at the dawn of the digital revolution.
To quite the late Douglas Adams: "Science is what we dream of...Technology is what we get stuck with". In this case, we are waiting for the reality of Technology to catch up with the dream of science.

It's going to be a fair few years until we get a Rf format camera that can go toe to toe or eclipse the current 35mm DSLR camera bodies. It's a simple product maturity issue and technology development cycle. We will probably have to be patient and wait for 3-4 years until we see the cameras that we really want on the shelves of our local camera shops.

In the mean time...still rocking my pair of mkIII's
 
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Pape

EOS 7D MK II
Dec 31, 2018
435
270
I dont quite get why peoples complain high megapixel camera files would take too much about storage space.
High megapixel jpg is lot smaller than low megapixel raw. At least on image sharpness high megapixel jpg gives lot more information what low pixel raw how ever you waste time editing it.
 

Bahrd

Red herrings...
Jun 30, 2013
42
16
The 90D is not a replacement for the 7D Mark II. In some areas it is a significant step back. In other areas it is a step forward.
I suppose the market for 7D III is so small that even a "low-hanging fruit" like the 1D X Mk II with the 90D's sensor is not worth the R&D effort.
 

AlanF

Canon 5DSR II
Aug 16, 2012
5,982
3,652
I dont quite get why peoples complain high megapixel camera files would take too much about storage space.
High megapixel jpg is lot smaller than low megapixel raw. At least on image sharpness high megapixel jpg gives lot more information what low pixel raw how ever you waste time editing it.
I store both the original raw and the jpeg in case I want to edit differently in the future.
 
Aug 21, 2019
7
0
My baseless prediction is that they'll also offer up a 7D III, based on the 90D sensor, with dual processors, supreme autofocus, and the rest of the 7D stuff that sets it apart. A rugged cropper.

More speculative - Maybe a hybred optical/LCD viewfinder that allows switching to "mirrorless" mode with the resultant DPAF and increased frame rate. Would be very cool for sports/action on a budget.

I wonder if they'll throw out any more EF-M lenses, or if that format is going to slide into oblivion. I would love to see an ultra-wide, and a short tele prime, along with some sort of f/4 normal zoom, like 15-60 or something like that. Just dreaming here - I know that there's only so much $$ in the development budget.
 
Aug 21, 2019
7
0
I hope your right I have been for the 7d3 for what seemed ages and was disappointed its been shelved rumours are saying the mirrorless have not tempted me to move as I have a lot of money tide up in glass for wildlife shooting they are now saying February for something special to be released ?
 

scyrene

EOS 5D MK IV
Dec 4, 2013
2,560
495
UK
www.flickr.com
I wonder if they'll throw out any more EF-M lenses, or if that format is going to slide into oblivion. I would love to see an ultra-wide, and a short tele prime, along with some sort of f/4 normal zoom, like 15-60 or something like that. Just dreaming here - I know that there's only so much $$ in the development budget.
I imagine there might be one or two more EF-M lenses, but nothing high end, because that's not how the line is positioned. Not so much sliding into oblivion as never getting above its station, which is small, light, and relatively cheap.
 

canonnews

EOS RP
Dec 27, 2017
395
390
Canada
www.canonnews.com
Canon may very well have a big 2020, but unfortunately for me, part of their big 2020 will not include bring out a Pro-mirrorless body. This is what I am waiting for. For me mirrorless brings so many good things to my way of shooting that I will likely not be purchasing another DSLR. So, wait I will for the pro-mirrorless. Who knows, maybe Canon will surprise me and get a high fps, Continuous AF, with 30 or 30+MP mirrorless out in 2020.
what makes you think they won't?

the 2021 article was a 1 series RF mount camera. not a "pro" or a 5D'ish camera.
 
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amorse

EOS 7D MK II
Jan 26, 2017
520
523
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It's here and it's called "R." If you want something different, you may be in for a wait.
I'm not quite sure I buy into that, and I say that not as a lamentation of the R (it's the most interesting mirrorless on the market for me at the moment), but rather as a reflection on what buyers of the 5D series are willing to pay versus what the R retails for. If the R was indeed a full replacement for the 5D series, I would have expected Canon to price it more comparably to the 5D IV. Then again, Canon may be changing their segmentation, moving the 5D equivalent down market a bit, and adding something above it. Either way, I really think that if consumers show they'll pay $3500 for a body of 5D stature, Canon will ensure they have a product priced in that realm, if not higher.
 
No one has to use any tricks to see that the 32mp sensor is better than the 24mp sensor. And if the new sensor was a 24mp model, its performance would be the same as the 80D and you would be complaining about Canon reusing an "old" sensor.
You must be a real sensor guru if you think that by taking recent generation of sensor tech and makeing its lower resolution variant all you get is the identical performance to the previous generation of sensor tech? :)
 

JohnC

EOS T7i
Sep 22, 2019
51
43
Gainesville,GA
I'm not quite sure I buy into that, and I say that not as a lamentation of the R (it's the most interesting mirrorless on the market for me at the moment), but rather as a reflection on what buyers of the 5D series are willing to pay versus what the R retails for. If the R was indeed a full replacement for the 5D series, I would have expected Canon to price it more comparably to the 5D IV. Then again, Canon may be changing their segmentation, moving the 5D equivalent down market a bit, and adding something above it. Either way, I really think that if consumers show they'll pay $3500 for a body of 5D stature, Canon will ensure they have a product priced in that realm, if not higher.

I agree, there is a lot of monetary real estate between the R and the current 1 series. I seriously doubt Canon will bring prices down that far. They might some in order to gain market share in mirroless as quickly as possible (higher end mirroless) but I don’t think we will see a 4-4.5k 1 series level camera.

I do think we will see a 3.3-3.7k high level camera that sits between. Who knows what they will call it.
 
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criscokkat

EOS RP
Sep 26, 2017
313
286
Madison, WI
I think the comments about the market for the 7dII drying up or being too small might be on the money, but in a different way. I think the majority of the 7d users wanted accurate focusing at high speeds. The dual card slots and weatherproof housing was a bonus for the majority of the users, but not critical.

The new m6II has shown that the baseline experience with the new Canon sensors can hit 14fps with very good focus tracking, and with a greater focus on electronics and firmware within the camera the m6II has given us a sneak peak at what could be done with a much higher MP count full frame body when it's cropped down for speed.

I've always thought that there were two different classes of people who invested in the 7d series:
1) Birders and sports photographers who need the crop factor to put maximum pixels on subjects that are far away and difficult to focus on.This group of people is much more likely to invest in high end (3k+) lenses. The reason the 1dx is not used is mostly because of pixels on target, and not as much because of money. This is also the group more likely to have a critical need for weatherproofing. This is also a much much smaller % of buyers.

2) Prosumers comprise most of this group, and are primarily people who wanted something that can focus well on fast moving subjects and have fast fps, but are generally not using anything bigger than a 70-200 or maybe a 100-400.

The number 1's can afford a more expensive full frame camera that can be used as full frame when needed, but can have much higher speeds when used as a crop with the same amount of pixels on target that APS-C could do. That camera will have the dual cards, ibis and weather sealing expected for that class of camera.

The people in group #2 are way more price sensitive, and many of them had already bled off to the 80d (and presumably 90d). The ones who are left who are more concerned with fast accurate focus will be able to jump into the next generation R or RP in a few years. Some of them could jump into the m6ii now. I imagine full frame R or RP will be in the 8-10 FPS with full tracking by the time they come out. And there's still a chance that Canon might release a 90d level of r-mount aps-c. If that happens, they add a bit more buffer to the internals used in the m6ii and they've hit the 7diii speeds and focus.
 

AccipiterQ

EOS T7i
Sep 11, 2014
59
48
I already have a Sony a9 and am using with adapted Canon glass ans Sony glass. The a9 is what has transformed my thinking about what a mirrorless camera can be for professional action photographers. There is a lot to like about the Sony a9, but a lot not to like as well. Thus, I am hopeful Canon can take the pro-mirrorless camera to the next level by doing what Sony has done, but also bringing along with it awesome usability that Sony just does not have.
What do you not like about the a9? I've gotten weary of waiting for a pro Canon mirrorless and thinking of making the jump. Also, is there a decline in the quality of shots with the Canon+Adapter on the a9?
 

AccipiterQ

EOS T7i
Sep 11, 2014
59
48
I think the comments about the market for the 7dII drying up or being too small might be on the money, but in a different way. I think the majority of the 7d users wanted accurate focusing at high speeds. The dual card slots and weatherproof housing was a bonus for the majority of the users, but not critical.

The new m6II has shown that the baseline experience with the new Canon sensors can hit 14fps with very good focus tracking, and with a greater focus on electronics and firmware within the camera the m6II has given us a sneak peak at what could be done with a much higher MP count full frame body when it's cropped down for speed.

I've always thought that there were two different classes of people who invested in the 7d series:
1) Birders and sports photographers who need the crop factor to put maximum pixels on subjects that are far away and difficult to focus on.This group of people is much more likely to invest in high end (3k+) lenses. The reason the 1dx is not used is mostly because of pixels on target, and not as much because of money. This is also the group more likely to have a critical need for weatherproofing. This is also a much much smaller % of buyers.

2) Prosumers comprise most of this group, and are primarily people who wanted something that can focus well on fast moving subjects and have fast fps, but are generally not using anything bigger than a 70-200 or maybe a 100-400.

The number 1's can afford a more expensive full frame camera that can be used as full frame when needed, but can have much higher speeds when used as a crop with the same amount of pixels on target that APS-C could do. That camera will have the dual cards, ibis and weather sealing expected for that class of camera.

The people in group #2 are way more price sensitive, and many of them had already bled off to the 80d (and presumably 90d). The ones who are left who are more concerned with fast accurate focus will be able to jump into the next generation R or RP in a few years. Some of them could jump into the m6ii now. I imagine full frame R or RP will be in the 8-10 FPS with full tracking by the time they come out. And there's still a chance that Canon might release a 90d level of r-mount aps-c. If that happens, they add a bit more buffer to the internals used in the m6ii and they've hit the 7diii speeds and focus.

It just seems odd to me that'd they'd abandon the birders/sports photographers, I refuse to believe there's no APS-C coming in mirrorless. You're basically ceding the entire sports/birding market to Sony with their a6500 or whatever it is. Maybe not today or tomorrow, but within a couple years those 7Dii's are going to be absolutely ancient in comparison.
 
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tiggy@mac.com

Pentax K-1000
Jan 20, 2014
505
198
Thetford, VT
www.ForestMetrix.com
What do you not like about the a9? I've gotten weary of waiting for a pro Canon mirrorless and thinking of making the jump. Also, is there a decline in the quality of shots with the Canon+Adapter on the a9?
I find that the EF lenses + the Sigma MC-11 adapter on the A9 is pretty fantastic. The AF is superior to my now-sold 1DX2, due in large part to the Sony firmware upgrades (anything > version 4). That new software provided a kind of tracking we haven't yet gotten yet on Canon DSLRs. The Canon R's new firmware reportedly starts to equal this, but the frames per second with continuous AF/tracking are too anemic (3 fps) for my uses. Bodes well for Canon, though, if they can put out something with higher throughput.

The A7r4, however, does not AF or track nearly as well as the A9 or 1DX2 when using adapted lenses. I should note I'm using Sigma Art primes on the MC-11 adapter, so its a best case scenario.

Using native lenses on the A7r4 are better, but still not as good AF as the A9, nor 1DX2.

Will be interesting in three weeks to see the rumored A92 come out, and see how it may combine some of the new A7r4 features with A9-class AF and tracking.
 

tiggy@mac.com

Pentax K-1000
Jan 20, 2014
505
198
Thetford, VT
www.ForestMetrix.com
The "Canon is gearing up for a big 2020" headline put in another context:

"Farmer Closes Barn Door, Gears up for Big Cattle Search in 2020"
Maybe more to the point...
"Man Bets Farm on Innovative Milking Machines; Expects Cow Delivery as Soon as 2020"

Then there is the news from the County Fair, as covered by CanonRumors (now quarterly)...
"Canon Shooters Win Thumb Twiddling Competition"
 
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stevelee

FT-QL
Jul 6, 2017
1,291
311
Davidson, NC
The 90D is not a replacement for the 7D Mark II. In some areas it is a significant step back. In other areas it is a step forward.
I am not one of them, but there are folks for whom the 7D line is the best camera choice there is, as best as I can tell. They know who they are. If they want something newer than the Mark II, they need to decide on their priorities and decide what compromises are worth it to get something else they want. For right now, it seems to me that the best solution for most of these folks is to use the 7D II until it breaks, and then buy another one (new, used, refurb). To get other features they want and to preserve the 7D II as long as possible, maybe a second camera with those features would be a good choice for their non-bird-or-sports-or-whatever shooting.