Canon officially announces the Cinema EOS C500 Mark II

Bahrd

Red herrings...
Jun 30, 2013
34
6
What is electronic image stabilization? IBIS or digital manipulation? Can 5 axis IS be done digitally?
Good question. We will find out soon, I 'm sure, but why not to speculate for a while: the first three axes are given, the back and forth movement compensation is likely implemented with the help of AF.
Can therefore the Dual Pixel Raw tech be effectively employed to compensate a movement in the yaw axis?
 

Etienne

EOS 6D MK II
Sep 19, 2010
1,352
152
Ottawa Ontario
Looks like a great camera, and it will be very popular with independent filmmakers, especially as a rental unit. The only downside I can see is the limited high frame rate options.
Check out the Cinema 5D comments:
 

Etienne

EOS 6D MK II
Sep 19, 2010
1,352
152
Ottawa Ontario
If I were an independent movie maker using an EOS R with 1.2 85 and 2.0 28-70 I would like to use these lenses on the C500 ii .
And there is another reason what makes RF mount interesting: You can use 99% of all the (D)SLR lenses ever produced - at the moment you do not get a lot of money for FD lenses so I have kept them. They are good for M50 but would be great for 4k full frame because it doesn't need that amount of resolution.
The C500 mk II has a user-changeable lens mount so Canon may be planning to release an RF mount for this camera.
 

Sharlin

EOS 6D MK II
Dec 26, 2015
968
413
Turku, Finland
Good question. We will find out soon, I 'm sure, but why not to speculate for a while: the first three axes are given, the back and forth movement compensation is likely implemented with the help of AF.
Can therefore the Dual Pixel Raw tech be effectively employed to compensate a movement in the yaw axis?
This is found in many Canon stills cameras. It combines lens optical IS with sensor-based digital cropping IS to achieve 5 DoF of stabilization.
 

neo302

I'm New Here
Feb 28, 2016
24
16
While not having high frame rates @4K stinks, I'd still take this any day over a RED and all the drama with that. I'm sure using this would be a lot more pleasurable. I think Canon did a great job with this one.
 
Aug 1, 2017
379
222
The lack of high frame 4K leaves room in the line for a revised super 35 C300 III. Canon likes to spread the good stuff around so you can't ever get everything you want/need in a single body. Even if that body costs $15,000.
 

Bahrd

Red herrings...
Jun 30, 2013
34
6
This is found in many Canon stills cameras. It combines lens optical IS with sensor-based digital cropping IS to achieve 5 DoF of stabilization.
You are probably right, I was just speculating how 5 DoF's can be achieved "[...] even without the use of lens with IS functionality."
 

syder

EOS 80D
Apr 29, 2012
198
59
The lack of high frame 4K leaves room in the line for a revised super 35 C300 III. Canon likes to spread the good stuff around so you can't ever get everything you want/need in a single body. Even if that body costs $15,000.
No.

This does 4K60p, which gives you 40% speed. If you really, really need super-slow motion for a project at 4K, rent a Phantom for your 1000fps needs. Or a Red monstro which retails at a shitload more more than 15k.

AFAIK no one does FF35 RAW recording at 120p + for 15k. Admittedly, it's much easier to do a higher frame rate if you're using a smaller sensor or lower resolution. Hence the 2K/120 mode.

20% slow motion is only needed for fairly specialised stuff. The vast majority of material is shot at regular frame rate, and most slow motion footage is 40/50% speed. And for a lot of specialised slow motion stuff, 20% is nowhere near slow enough, hence the 1000/2000fps Phantom. Which unless you're made of money you rent.

I guess the next complaint is that this isn't a 50 megapixel stills camera, with stupid Canon forcing you to buy another camera for photography.
 
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Reactions: Sharlin
Aug 1, 2017
379
222
No.

This does 4K60p, which gives you 40% speed. If you really, really need super-slow motion for a project at 4K, rent a Phantom for your 1000fps needs. Or a Red monstro which retails at a shitload more more than 15k.

AFAIK no one does FF35 RAW recording at 120p + for 15k. Admittedly, it's much easier to do a higher frame rate if you're using a smaller sensor or lower resolution. Hence the 2K/120 mode.

20% slow motion is only needed for fairly specialised stuff. The vast majority of material is shot at regular frame rate, and most slow motion footage is 40/50% speed. And for a lot of specialised slow motion stuff, 20% is nowhere near slow enough, hence the 1000/2000fps Phantom. Which unless you're made of money you rent.

I guess the next complaint is that this isn't a 50 megapixel stills camera, with stupid Canon forcing you to buy another camera for photography.
My point being it creates an opening for a smaller frame high speed body between the C200 and C500's since the C500 has now dropped down into the C300's former price range. I don't think 120 FPS is an exotic frame rate. 60P is only slow motion if you are composing to a 24p or 30p timeline. My 3 1/2 year old 1DX Mark II does full frame 2K at 120 FPS. I don't know if the camera is technically capable of 4K 120 FPS and I suspect you don't either. If the point you are trying to make is that Canon doesn't spread it's features and benefits across the product line good luck with that.
 

RunAndGun

EOS RP
Dec 16, 2011
317
15
There are only three axes. ”Five axes” is a misnomer, although unfortunately too widely used to change now. What’s actually there is five degrees of freedom.
I was just more or less referring to Canons info. But overall that goes to show just how effective relentless marketing is(say anything enough and it becomes "true"). Much like the term "Full HD". Nowhere in the ATSC specs was there any type of terminology like this differentiating 720P, 1080i or 1080p(which is not an official HD transmission standard), but even professionals started using it.