Canon officially announces the RF 24-240mm f/4-6.3 IS STM

pixel8foto

EOS M50
Jan 27, 2015
47
6
UK
www.joelgoodman.net
On my last trip I took the EOS R, RF 24-105, and the EF 70-300 L with the adapter. It would have been great to have nearly that entire range in a single lens that’s about the same size as the RF 24-105.
+1
Compared to a 6D+24-105, an EOS-R+24-240 would be great, even if a tad less bright when you zoom.
As soon as Canon release a mirrorless 5D with proper knobs, buttons and IBIS, I'll buy that and one of these and then start looking at how it performs with the adaptor and EF lenses.
 

degos

EOS 80D
Mar 20, 2015
194
119
I question the logic you've applied to reach this conclusion.
Go to Amazon.com right now and a sold-by-Amazon 6D and Tamron 28-300 together cost just under $1600, not $2200. That's the true level of full-frame entry-level superzoomage.

Or perhaps you want to splurge on a 6D II with the lens, that'll cost $1900. Still cheaper than this 'affordable' RP kit nonsense.

Canon want to position full-frame as a premium tier, rather than something affordable. Their entire strategy to date with RF reinforces that.
 
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Reactions: max_sr

justaCanonuser

Grab your camera, go out and shoot!
Feb 12, 2014
377
207
Frankfurt, Germany
The kit is too expensive, for now. I expect to see this under 2000 by end of August. This is simply to get that early adopter bump and to make sales later look better.
I can imagine that we'll see cash back actions in near future including this kit. Here in Germany e.g. Canon runs an "EOS plus X" offer that already includes the EOS R.
 

Chaitanya

EOS 6D MK II
Jun 27, 2013
1,026
133
33
Pune
I’d check myself into a mental health facility long before I’d pay $600 for a 50/1.8.
For a Canon RF 50mm f/1.8 Macro IS STM(as stated in OP) $600 sounds like a steal if it does 1:1 mag ratio. Nikon is selling their 60mm f/2.8 macro without image stabilization for ~$600.
 

koenkooi

EOS RP
Feb 25, 2015
294
143
For a Canon RF 50mm f/1.8 Macro IS STM(as stated in OP) $600 sounds like a steal if it does 1:1 mag ratio. Nikon is selling their 60mm f/2.8 macro without image stabilization for ~$600.
I bet such a lens will be 1:2 mag like the RF35 and EF50 f/2.5. I also think a 50mm counterpart to the RF35 will have a similar price, so $500.
 

Hector1970

EOS 6D MK II
Mar 22, 2012
1,057
224
It will really help sell RP cameras. It's just the sort of range a beginner would really want.
It would have been unimaginable years ago that you'd fork out $2000 on your first camera kit but there seems to be plenty of beginners for whom it is no issue.
I will be interested to see some real world tests on it.
I'd suspect it will be so-so quality wise - it would be nice if Canon surprised me with it. It's not a cheap lens. You'd hope it could well outperform the equivalent Tamron lens or EF-s 18-200mm zoom
 
Reactions: Architect1776

Pape

EOS RP
Dec 31, 2018
298
147
Hmm it got quite big front lense . I hope its optimized very sharp for 240mm like macrozoom.
 

Architect1776

Defining the poetics of space through Architecture
Aug 18, 2017
214
165
117
Williamsport, PA
Hmm it got quite big front lense . I hope its optimized very sharp for 240mm like macrozoom.
I just hope that Canon avoids any dog lenses in the RF line-up.
With computers and current technology there is no reason for any Canon lens to be a dog.
Yes it might not please pixel peepers (They never are pleased) but good decently sharp photos at 16X20 should not be difficult to do for any new Canon lens.
 

lawny13

I'm New Here
Mar 6, 2019
24
33
Tamron 28-300 Di VC ( full-frame ) is $699 retail. It's not a stunning lens, but it's entry-level.

Canon are on the record as saying that to them full-frame mirrorless is all about fat margins. There's your example.
It’s not an OEM lens. Probably won’t work as well as the canon RF lenses on RF bodies. So tamron can’t exactly charge the same price. So your logic here is a little flawed.

Not to mention. When the 3rd party manufacturers start producing for RF mount people are free to choose them if they want to.

BTW most FF superzooms cost in this ball park or more.
 

Trey T

EOS T7i
Feb 6, 2019
84
32
In what world is $899 an entry level price?
Vast majority of pro shoots w/ constant aperture zoom lenses to make their life easier, and the entry-level shooters (newbies) should too. You're right, it's not for entry-level ...
 

neuroanatomist

I post too Much on Here!!
Jul 21, 2010
24,181
1,451
Vast majority of pro shoots w/ constant aperture zoom lenses to make their life easier, and the entry-level shooters (newbies) should too. You're right, it's not for entry-level ...
I disagree. Most ‘entry level’ shooters use one of the many available auto-exposure modes, even if they move off the green box or scene modes, most will be in Av or Tv. Auto-exposure renders a constant-aperture zoom irrelevant, since the changing aperture will be compensated for by another side of the triangle. Heck, with many newer cameras there is auto ISO in M mode with available EC, so even for manual shooters the need for a constant aperture is pretty much nil.

IMO, the advantage of constant aperture zooms is not that the aperture is constant, but rather that the aperture is relatively faster than a corresponding variable aperture zoom. I shoot with a 24-70/2.8 and a 70-200/2.8 because they’re f/2.8, not f/5.6.
 

takesome1

EOS 5Ds R II
Aug 23, 2013
1,477
103
I didn't realize that there was a rule against requesting stuff*, I'd like to see, in the future.
I'm sorry that this stuff* offended you! Different strokes for different folks, and all that stuff*.

Stuff* is a place holder for another word that starts with "S." Have a nice day :LOL:
It sounds like someone is full of stuff*
 

unfocused

EOS 5D SR
I disagree. Most ‘entry level’ shooters use one of the many available auto-exposure modes, even if they move off the green box or scene modes, most will be in Av or Tv. Auto-exposure renders a constant-aperture zoom irrelevant, since the changing aperture will be compensated for by another side of the triangle. Heck, with many newer cameras there is auto ISO in M mode with available EC, so even for manual shooters the need for a constant aperture is pretty much nil.

IMO, the advantage of constant aperture zooms is not that the aperture is constant, but rather that the aperture is relatively faster than a corresponding variable aperture zoom. I shoot with a 24-70/2.8 and a 70-200/2.8 because they’re f/2.8, not f/5.6.
I agree with your assessment. But, adding:

It's kind of silly to talk about any EOS R lens and body as "entry level." The cost of entry into full frame mirrorless by Canon is $2,000 with this lens. This may be "entry level" for the 1%, but for most consumers "entry level" is much more likely to remain an "M" or Rebel DSLR.

I believe most people buying this lens are likely to know exactly what they are getting.