Canon RP Thread

CanonFanBoy

EOS 5D SR
Jan 28, 2015
3,737
1,305
Irving, Texas
I will soon be the proud owner of a Canon RP and since there doesn't seem to be a thread about the RP, I thought I might create one.

My question really has to do with the three adapters. I understand the basic adapter. I can really appreciate the idea of the drop in filter adapter. My question is what functionality the control ring adapter would have when an EF lens is mounted to it. Is it functional when using EF lenses? Or should I just stick with the plain adapter?

It will be a good long while before I can afford a native RF lens, so this is a concern for me.

Also, are there any actual RP users on this forum that can give a quick review. It seems the R gets all the love right now. Thanks guys!

Edit: Apparently I don't know how to create a thread. :(
 

neuroanatomist

I post too Much on Here!!
Jul 21, 2010
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Native RF lenses have a control ring that can have functions assigned to it. The control ring adapter adds that functionality for EF lenses.
 
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CanonFanBoy

EOS 5D SR
Jan 28, 2015
3,737
1,305
Irving, Texas
Native RF lenses have a control ring that can have functions assigned to it. The control ring adapter adds that functionality for EF lenses.
Thank you Neuro. You own the R. Are there any real stills advantages over the RP? I know the sensor is better on the R. Have you been happy with the R? Has focus been very good when using EF lenses? Thanks again. I'm just not finding a lot from RP owners here. I'm also thinking of waiting for the Christmas season to see whether the price drops further. I hate that I missed out on the free grip extender. Sold my EF 35mm f/1.4L II and a couple of rifles to start getting myself set up to purchase. I could purchase today, but I want to see whether it goes on sale or not. A purchase like this is a huge deal for me. I do portraits and fashion, so I am thinking a basic FF camera like the RP might make an excellent backup camera. Permanently mount my 24-70 on the RP and my 70-200 to my 5D Mark III. Could always get another 5D Mark III, I guess.
 
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bhf3737

---
Sep 9, 2015
427
393
Calgary, Canada
www.flickr.com
On R, and I guess in RP in manual mode, we can control ISO, shutter speed and aperture with the two dials on camera and the control ring on the lens. So having full control with just turn a dial or ring, regardless of what lens EF/EF-S or RF used. When using the CPL/ND adapter with EF/EF-S lenses, we lose the ring, but the Fv mode is there offering one dial to switch among the ISO, shutter speed and aperture and another dial to sets their values. On R, however, I also use the multi-function bar (unfortunately not available in RP) to quickly select the single, group or zone focus points with swipe of the thumb. Overall, quite pleasant to shoot with.
Congrats in advance on you soon to be EOS RP camera.
 

koenkooi

EOS 7D MK II
Feb 25, 2015
437
260
RP owner here. All my EF lenses work great, no issues with that. For my hand size (medium sized hands for 6') I really needed the grip extender. After using it for 3 months I bought the CPL adapter and clear glass insert to protect the sensor a bit more, I had a lot of large dust spots in the center.
I've rented the R this week and noticed a few differences in how they work. On the RP flipping the MF switch or attaching an MF lens unlocks the magnify option. On the R you need to be in a specific focus mode (not L+Tracking!) to use magnify in MF.

If you have a few 'crappy' lenses, like the EF 85/1.8 install the lens profile on the camera and enable all 3 abberation correction options. That will make DPP auto-enable DLO. For such lenses I have DPP export TIFFs that I import into Lightroom. For lenses like the 100mm L macro I don't bother and go straight to Lightroom.

Also note that the RP doesn't have a proper colour profile in Lightroom yet, so if you are using the 'Camera Matching' or 'Camera Neutral', you are out of luck. I've read about someone editing the 6D2 profile and using that, but I haven't tried that myself.
 

justaCanonuser

Grab your camera, go out and shoot!
Feb 12, 2014
435
247
Frankfurt, Germany
I will soon be the proud owner of a Canon RP and since there doesn't seem to be a thread about the RP, I thought I might create one.
I appreciate you started this thread, CanonFanBoy, and I look forward to read about your real life experience with your RP. I still struggle with myself whether I should add an R or RP to my already far too extended gear... If you go for street shooting with your RP or do macros, I am particularly interested in your comments. For me, the RP offers two nice features worth considering it: small form factor, so with a smaller lens it should be less intrusive for people, and focus stacking (I wonder why Canon did not include focus stacking in the EOS R).
 
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CanonFanBoy

EOS 5D SR
Jan 28, 2015
3,737
1,305
Irving, Texas
I appreciate you started this thread, CanonFanBoy, and I look forward to read about your real life experience with your RP. I still struggle with myself whether I should add an R or RP to my already far too extended gear... If you go for street shooting with your RP or do macros, I am particularly interested in your comments. For me, the RP offers two nice features worth considering it: small form factor, so with a smaller lens it should be less intrusive for people, and focus stacking (I wonder why Canon did not include focus stacking in the EOS R).
The other question for me is what an RP Mark II might be. It will take a couple of years to find that out. However, with the price so low one could always add one later. I'll have to read up on focus stacking to see whether it would be a benefit for what I do.
 
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koenkooi

EOS 7D MK II
Feb 25, 2015
437
260
The other question for me is what an RP Mark II might be. It will take a couple of years to find that out. However, with the price so low one could always add one later. I'll have to read up on focus stacking to see whether it would be a benefit for what I do.
For me the focus stacking is of limited use because of two things:
  1. It uses a fully electronic shutter, so no flash will be used
  2. It moves the lens focus, which doesn't work too well with lenses that have focus breathing, like most Canon macro lenses.
I tried it in a well lit environment with a 1:4 magnification ratio and it worked well enough. But it involved a lot of trial and error, since the 'step size' is a magic number without any explanation on how big the resulting step will be.

The RP has the following process:
  1. Set number of steps
  2. Set near focus
  3. Start shooting
  4. Review pictures
  5. Increase number of steps
  6. Goto 2
The focus stack module in Magic Lantern (not working yet on the R/RP) has a better way of doing it:
  1. Set near focus limit
  2. Set far focus limit
  3. Set number of steps manually or let the module calculate DoF and set it automagically
  4. Start shooting
But the builtin version of the RP is fast and quiet, it feels like way more than 5fps.
 
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neuroanatomist

I post too Much on Here!!
Jul 21, 2010
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Thank you Neuro. You own the R. Are there any real stills advantages over the RP? I know the sensor is better on the R. Have you been happy with the R? Has focus been very good when using EF lenses?
I bought the R the week the RP launched, and for me the R had only one major advantage – I was leaving on a trip that week where I wanted to take a smaller FF than my 1D X, and the R was in stock whereas the RP was not. I think the RP is a great camera, I’d have bought it over the R if my timing had been different.

I have been happy with the R. Focus with EF lenses is good for most use cases (and no different with RF lenses). The only situation where I’ve found the R focus inadequate is birds in flight – I have no trouble putting the focus point on a bird and tracking it across an arc of sky, but despite that the R can’t seem to lock focus. For ‘regular’ subjects (static, kids running, etc.), the R has no problems.
 

AlanF

Canon 5DSR II
Aug 16, 2012
5,453
2,609
I bought the R the week the RP launched, and for me the R had only one major advantage – I was leaving on a trip that week where I wanted to take a smaller FF than my 1D X, and the R was in stock whereas the RP was not. I think the RP is a great camera, I’d have bought it over the R if my timing had been different.

I have been happy with the R. Focus with EF lenses is good for most use cases (and no different with RF lenses). The only situation where I’ve found the R focus inadequate is birds in flight – I have no trouble putting the focus point on a bird and tracking it across an arc of sky, but despite that the R can’t seem to lock focus. For ‘regular’ subjects (static, kids running, etc.), the R has no problems.
Thanks for that info about birds in flight - it's essential for me.
 

koenkooi

EOS 7D MK II
Feb 25, 2015
437
260
I bought the R the week the RP launched, and for me the R had only one major advantage – I was leaving on a trip that week where I wanted to take a smaller FF than my 1D X, and the R was in stock whereas the RP was not. I think the RP is a great camera, I’d have bought it over the R if my timing had been different.

I have been happy with the R. Focus with EF lenses is good for most use cases (and no different with RF lenses). The only situation where I’ve found the R focus inadequate is birds in flight – I have no trouble putting the focus point on a bird and tracking it across an arc of sky, but despite that the R can’t seem to lock focus. For ‘regular’ subjects (static, kids running, etc.), the R has no problems.
Similar scenario: low and slow single motor airplane flying overhead against a clear bly sky: RP acts like it's all clear blue sky and doesn't put a focus box on the plane.
 

neuroanatomist

I post too Much on Here!!
Jul 21, 2010
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Thanks for that info about birds in flight - it's essential for me.
Honestly, I had hoped for better. Having said that, I had not planned on the R replacing my 1D X, and the latter remains my go-to camera. I bought the R as a travel camera, and it's been great for that use. Birds were just an opportunistic subject on a family trip last month, kids were playing at the beach on Prince Edward Island. But I was disappointed that the R could not AF on lone seagulls or cormorants gliding past against a clear blue sky.
 
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privatebydesign

Would you take advice from a cartoons stuffed toy?
Jan 29, 2011
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Honestly, I had hoped for better. Having said that, I had not planned on the R replacing my 1D X, and the latter remains my go-to camera. I bought the R as a travel camera, and it's been great for that use. Birds were just an opportunistic subject on a family trip last month, kids were playing at the beach on Prince Edward Island. But I was disappointed that the R could not AF on lone seagulls or cormorants gliding past against a clear blue sky.
I took a bit if a hit here (not from Neuro) when I pointed out immediately on using them that the R and the RP don’t compare very well to DSLR AF especially in Servo mode and ‘challenging’ situations, low light, fast moving subjects etc etc. Though it does seem the R and RP are more accurate/consistent than the DSLR’s when using the dedicated ultra fast lenses.

As a broad generalization if I was shooting primarily portraits I’d like an R and 50/85 f1.2, if I was doing mostly action/low light I’d want DSLR and the 2.8 zoom trinity. For low light events I have found the R to lag badly behind the 1DX MkII.
 
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I took a bit if a hit here (not from Neuro) when I pointed out immediately on using them that the R and the RP don’t compare very well to DSLR AF especially in Servo mode and ‘challenging’ situations, low light, fast moving subjects etc etc. Though it does seem the R and RP are more accurate/consistent than the DSLR’s when using the dedicated ultra fast lenses.

As a broad generalization if I was shooting primarily portraits I’d like an R and 50/85 f1.2, if I was doing mostly action/low light I’d want DSLR and the 2.8 zoom trinity. For low light events I have found the R to lag badly behind the 1DX MkII.
+1. I'll also add that the R is still better for portraits even using adapted EF lenses. The EF 24 II and 50L focused much more accurately on the R than on my 5D4 (before I sold them to fund the RF 50), and the wider area for the AF point is great for portraiture.

I had both the 5D4 and the 5D3 (backup), and the 5D3 went rarely used. I replaced the 5D3 with the R to get access to RF glass and I now use both the 5D4 and the R regularly. 5D4 is used for sports and travel (GPS and battery life). R for portraiture or indoors (people, mainly because of how good the RF 50 is) or as a portable option for side trip (R + RF 35).
 
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justaCanonuser

Grab your camera, go out and shoot!
Feb 12, 2014
435
247
Frankfurt, Germany
For me the focus stacking is of limited use because of two things:
  1. It uses a fully electronic shutter, so no flash will be used
  2. It moves the lens focus, which doesn't work too well with lenses that have focus breathing, like most Canon macro lenses.
I tried it in a well lit environment with a 1:4 magnification ratio and it worked well enough. But it involved a lot of trial and error, since the 'step size' is a magic number without any explanation on how big the resulting step will be.

The RP has the following process:
  1. Set number of steps
  2. Set near focus
  3. Start shooting
  4. Review pictures
  5. Increase number of steps
  6. Goto 2
The focus stack module in Magic Lantern (not working yet on the R/RP) has a better way of doing it:
  1. Set near focus limit
  2. Set far focus limit
  3. Set number of steps manually or let the module calculate DoF and set it automagically
  4. Start shooting
But the builtin version of the RP is fast and quiet, it feels like way more than 5fps.
Thank you very much for your very helpful reply! Indeed, I am a bit dissapointed now, reading your list, since I'd have expected a more user friendly implementation such as the one made by Magic Lantern. I didn't know about this hack, I really should I check their apps again frequently (did that ages ago). So I am going to check whether I can install this hack on my 7D Mk II, my standard macro camera so far.

Btw from your kind reply I learned again I still can find nice, helpful people like you in photosite threads, not only trolls (in particular Canon haters). Have a nice day, and thanks again.
 

justaCanonuser

Grab your camera, go out and shoot!
Feb 12, 2014
435
247
Frankfurt, Germany
The only situation where I’ve found the R focus inadequate is birds in flight – I have no trouble putting the focus point on a bird and tracking it across an arc of sky, but despite that the R can’t seem to lock focus. For ‘regular’ subjects (static, kids running, etc.), the R has no problems.
I heard that from other R users already. So, for the full range of birding settings, a good DSLR still might be the better choice.
 

neuroanatomist

I post too Much on Here!!
Jul 21, 2010
24,565
2,001
I heard that from other R users already. So, for the full range of birding settings, a good DSLR still might be the better choice.
Definitely. As I said, the 1D X remains my go-to camera. But, the issue does make me wonder about the rumored ‘pro’ EOS R...if the AF is not dramatically improved for challenging subjects, that would be problematic.
 
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Jul 12, 2019
2
5
NYC
www.afithers.com
Hey y'all, new here. I'm a pro studio shooter in NYC with occasional documentary work. I picked up and RP last month with the 40mm f2.8 and Control Ring for travel and casual snapshots. So far I am loving this thing, really hoping for an rf pancake to take full advantage of the compact full frame system. I gave the Canon subreddit a try but nuked my account shortly after due to idiocy and trolls who fixated on vinyl tape over anything I had to say.


my new puppy Suzi camping for her first time with us last weekend, image straight from camera no post-processing.
 

Act444

EOS 6D MK II
May 4, 2011
980
79
+1. I'll also add that the R is still better for portraits even using adapted EF lenses. The EF 24 II and 50L focused much more accurately on the R than on my 5D4 (before I sold them to fund the RF 50), and the wider area for the AF point is great for portraiture.

I had both the 5D4 and the 5D3 (backup), and the 5D3 went rarely used. I replaced the 5D3 with the R to get access to RF glass and I now use both the 5D4 and the R regularly. 5D4 is used for sports and travel (GPS and battery life). R for portraiture or indoors (people, mainly because of how good the RF 50 is) or as a portable option for side trip (R + RF 35).
Interesting. What about color rendition though? From the sample photos I’ve seen, the R seems to impart this yellowish hue to photos that the 5D4 doesn’t and I imagine this could potentially wreak havoc on certain skin tones.

The RF 50 sounds good though, and I see it as a good match for the proposed high-res R body.