Cassi, from today's shoot

CanonFanBoy

EOS 5D SR
Jan 28, 2015
4,085
1,629
Irving, Texas
EOS R, RF 85mm f/1.2L, 6 stop ND filter, 38" glow para pop with a focusing rod and Flashpoint AD200 Pro. I'm still trying to learn to match colors throughout the shoot sequence (is that called grading?), so sorry for all the variance. The light constantly changing didn't help. I still have a whole lot to learn, but that's what makes it fun. This style is something new I am trying.
 

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Photorex

EOS RP
Nov 19, 2016
247
36
Hello CFB,

I alos like the E5a1950 the best.
Regarding your question about the constant light/colours in different images.
Two thoughts from me without being an experienced portrait photographer as well:
1. Don't change the composition itself too much so that the sun keeps in the same position in each shot (then crop in post for the wished composition)
2. I miss the glden light in the other two shots with Cassi in the yellow bikini. Maybe a (golden) reflector would have helped to reflect the golden light back on the skin of Cassi.
 
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CanonFanBoy

EOS 5D SR
Jan 28, 2015
4,085
1,629
Irving, Texas
Ahh, so you know your birds well, but I still don't think you were very humane.

Jack
Hello CFB,

I alos like the E5a1950 the best.
Regarding your question about the constant light/colours in different images.
Two thoughts from me without being an experienced portrait photographer as well:
1. Don't change the composition itself too much so that the sun keeps in the same position in each shot (then crop in post for the wished composition)
2. I miss the glden light in the other two shots with Cassi in the yellow bikini. Maybe a (golden) reflector would have helped to reflect the golden light back on the skin of Cassi.
Thanks!
 

privatebydesign

Would you take advice from a cartoons stuffed toy?
Jan 29, 2011
7,905
1,046
119
Colors, use a Colorchecker to make a shoot specific camera profile. Shoot at a set ºK, don't use auto WB, gel the flashes to match the ambient.

Once you do this on import import one image, make the camera profile, close and reopen Lightroom (or whatever program you use, and do basic adjustments to the one imported image save this develop 'recipe' including the custom camera profile as an import profile. Now import all the images from the shoot applying your custom import 'Develop Settings' to all the shoots images, all your images will be the same color. Then just tone one to taste and apply that adjustment to all the images.

Traditionally color grading was a term reserved for movie/film/video work but as the stills and video disciplines have become ever more interlinked people are using the term more broadly. Also the two stages of color work, correction and grading were separate, correction meant getting all the clips or images to the same basic and optimized color and exposure, and grading meant applying tonalities and tones and tints to create a look.

I would call getting images to have the same basic look of color and or exposure and tonality as color correction and this can include local corrections where there are different colored light sources. I'd call overall effects to create a mood or look grading and this is done after correction.
 
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SecureGSM

2 x 5D IV
Feb 26, 2017
1,308
302
Hi PBD,
cFb was shooting with a small Godox ad200 into a gold reflector as per his original message.
With Such as lighting setup, even small change of reflector angle will affect K temperature of the light falling on the Subject. As we mix a warmer reflected light with a natural light. Nothing that cannot be fixed in post but unlikely colour card will address the problem from the get go. Some more work will be required
Just wanted to provide an additional angle of view to consider. Not being critical complementary information only
 

CanonFanBoy

EOS 5D SR
Jan 28, 2015
4,085
1,629
Irving, Texas
Hi PBD,
cFb was shooting with a small Godox ad200 into a gold reflector as per his original message.
With Such as lighting setup, even small change of reflector angle will affect K temperature of the light falling on the Subject. As we mix a warmer reflected light with a natural light. Nothing that cannot be fixed in post but unlikely colour card will address the problem from the get go. Some more work will be required
Just wanted to provide an additional angle of view to consider. Not being critical complementary information only
There was no gold reflector. I never wrote that. :) I don't own a gold reflector.
 

CanonFanBoy

EOS 5D SR
Jan 28, 2015
4,085
1,629
Irving, Texas
Colors, use a Colorchecker to make a shoot specific camera profile. Shoot at a set ºK, don't use auto WB, gel the flashes to match the ambient.

Once you do this on import import one image, make the camera profile, close and reopen Lightroom (or whatever program you use, and do basic adjustments to the one imported image save this develop 'recipe' including the custom camera profile as an import profile. Now import all the images from the shoot applying your custom import 'Develop Settings' to all the shoots images, all your images will be the same color. Then just tone one to taste and apply that adjustment to all the images.

Traditionally color grading was a term reserved for movie/film/video work but as the stills and video disciplines have become ever more interlinked people are using the term more broadly. Also the two stages of color work, correction and grading were separate, correction meant getting all the clips or images to the same basic and optimized color and exposure, and grading meant applying tonalities and tones and tints to create a look.

I would call getting images to have the same basic look of color and or exposure and tonality as color correction and this can include local corrections where there are different colored light sources. I'd call overall effects to create a mood or look grading and this is done after correction.
Thank you so very much for your very well noted advice and instruction. I do have a color checker card, but have never used it. Again, thank you very very much!