Coronavirus and Canon production

Mahk43

EOS R
Feb 28, 2020
24
28
France
www.lechodelavaunage.fr
If it is built and packed, why is it not being shipped? Would not Canon want ROI as early as can?
For what I know of mass production, they make big batchs. they produce, control, pack, and then they wait the whole batch finished and ready to ship everything. They can't ship cameras one by one, it would be too expensive, they use boat and full containers.
It is even more true for brand new products launching, as they ship to the locals canon dealers in each continents. It take time, they use boats, it is long, everything cannot be synchronized. Then they wait every continent has received the first batchs of products to make the final delivery to local stores in the same time (more or less depending what they promises to the final customers)
So there is a good chance your camera is allready produced, but waiting in Asia or in your dealer's warehouse, waiting everthing is ready for final ship.
 

Mahk43

EOS R
Feb 28, 2020
24
28
France
www.lechodelavaunage.fr
In my understanding - Virus, unlike bacteria is not affected by temperatures that we can survive in.
Yes, there is no evidence to support that this will go away when the weather warms up.

In the past, they've observed a lower level of contamination during warmer period but they cannot explain it as for some countries warmer all the time, there are contaminations (seems to be warmer but also wet countries).
The reason would not be the strenght of the virus or bacteria itself but the habit of people, that live more outside, with benefit of sun and dry climate that make them stronger and slow the contamination.
 
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Quackator

EOS RP
Jul 19, 2011
331
166
If it is built and packed, why is it not being shipped? Would not Canon want ROI as early as can?
Canon wants to meet initial demand globally at once.
First wave of buyers usually buys at suggested retail price,
and if you start sales all over the world on a specific day, you
make everybody a first wave buyer, buying at full release price.

This is much more profitable and limits fraud and blackmarket
sales at the same time.

So cameras are shipped to all licensed pro dealers a few days
in advance with a sales embargo until the launch day.
Sell a day early, and you will never be able to buy from Canon again.


A few months after the launch, the price drops to their
projected sustained sales target price, grabbing the second
wave of buyers. And near the end of life for this product, the
price drops to stock clearing price level.

At every of these levels, Canon makes a profit.
Unit production price and retail price are only very
loosely connected.
 
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Architect1776

Defining the poetics of space through Architecture
Aug 18, 2017
532
482
118
Williamsport, PA
H1N1 had a death rate of about 0.02% of people who caught it. While the data on COVID-19 is still new, it's thought to be about 2%.

So, if this spreads as easily as H1N1 but is confirmed to be about 100 times more deadly, yes, I'd say it's worth concern.

It is not spreading as the H1N1. Most all who have died , thus skewing the percent are old and chronically ill who would die from a cold anyway. As I said the H1N1 killed young healthy people that it is NOT doing so now. Many have had it, not known it and got well with NO treatment.
 

Architect1776

Defining the poetics of space through Architecture
Aug 18, 2017
532
482
118
Williamsport, PA
If you are looking at a virus that is already played out, then the absolute numbers can easily look very dramatic. The typical flue looks pretty dramatic, when viewed in absolute numbers. What you are missing is that the estimated mortality rate of H1N1was 0,01%-0,08%, where as the current estimated mortality rate of corona is just above 2%.
If current mortality rate estimates are correct and corona infects as many people as H1N1 did, then we are looking at death tolls that will absolutely dwarf the swine flue epidemic of 2009.

Mortality estimates could easily be way off though and luckily summer is just around the corner. There is a good chance, that warmer weather will slow down the spread.
As I stated previously. The H1N1 killed young healthy people by 80%. The Corona so far has killed old chronically ill and weak people who would have died from a cold. There is a huge difference in population affected. PS for those history challenged people, We still have the Spanish flu of 100 years ago being fought to this day.
 

Kit Lens Jockey

EOS 7D MK II
Nov 12, 2016
677
407
It is not spreading as the H1N1.
It is still far too early to say that, being that we are only a few months into the epidemic, and a lot of places like the US don't even have widespread testing ready for it.

Most all who have died , thus skewing the percent are old and chronically ill who would die from a cold anyway.
This isn't very well worded, but I think what you're saying is that because it kills old people, that skews the percentage. But it doesn't skew anything. If you get it, and you die, that determines its mortality rate. It doesn't matter if you're old, young, healthy, unhealthy, or whatever.

As I said the H1N1 killed young healthy people that it is NOT doing so now. Many have had it, not known it and got well with NO treatment.
This is a double edged sword. In one case, it does suggest that maybe we are under-counting cases, meaning the mortality rate would be lower, since there are actually more people overall that are getting it.

But on the other hand, the idea that people may have it without even knowing it is a problem because then they are also spreading it to more people without knowing it.

You are making a ton of assumptions when it is still far too early to make them based on the data we have. The fact is we just don't know enough about it yet to know how bad it is or will be, so the only reasonable reaction right now is utmost caution. Because it will look pretty bad if it turns out to be bad, and we look back to the beginning of when it began to spread and realize that we did not take it seriously in the beginning.
 
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Frederik_Bo

EOS M50
Feb 6, 2017
45
9
As I stated previously. The H1N1 killed young healthy people by 80%. The Corona so far has killed old chronically ill and weak people who would have died from a cold. There is a huge difference in population affected. PS for those history challenged people, We still have the Spanish flu of 100 years ago being fought to this day.
Well old people are people too.
But I hope you are right, that everyone is just overreacting. But to me the mortality rates reported so far are super scary.
 

Architect1776

Defining the poetics of space through Architecture
Aug 18, 2017
532
482
118
Williamsport, PA
It is still far too early to say that, being that we are only a few months into the epidemic, and a lot of places like the US don't even have widespread testing ready for it.


This isn't very well worded, but I think what you're saying is that because it kills old people, that skews the percentage. But it doesn't skew anything. If you get it, and you die, that determines its mortality rate. It doesn't matter if you're old, young, healthy, unhealthy, or whatever.


This is a double edged sword. In one case, it does suggest that maybe we are under-counting cases, meaning the mortality rate would be lower, since there are actually more people overall that are getting it.

But on the other hand, the idea that people may have it without even knowing it is a problem because then they are also spreading it to more people without knowing it.

You are making a ton of assumptions when it is still far too early to make them based on the data we have. The fact is we just don't know enough about it yet to know how bad it is or will be, so the only reasonable reaction right now is utmost caution. Because it will look pretty bad if it turns out to be bad, and we look back to the beginning of when it began to spread and realize that we did not take it seriously in the beginning.
Believe as you wish, I have lived through over a dozen of theses scares, none have panned out as the media have predicted. I look at this compared to other far more deadly viruses and really do not see anything to panic about in any way. PS, I work in the healthcare industry.
 

Kit Lens Jockey

EOS 7D MK II
Nov 12, 2016
677
407
Believe as you wish, I have lived through over a dozen of theses scares, none have panned out as the media have predicted. I look at this compared to other far more deadly viruses and really do not see anything to panic about in any way. PS, I work in the healthcare industry.
I'm not "believing" anything. That is the whole point. I'm not making any assumptions or beliefs about it the way that you are.

I'm accepting the fact that we don't know enough about this to be able to determine how dangerous it is or isn't at this point. So the prudent response is to exercise caution as if it is dangerous, because the cost of treating it as if it were not dangerous would be too great if it turns out that it is dangerous.

And honestly I don't care what you do unless it's specifically related to expertise in infectious diseases. And along with that, I am listening to the messaging coming from the CDC themselves, not the media's spin on it.
 
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Mt Spokane Photography

I post too Much on Here!!
Mar 25, 2011
15,710
880
A recent study shows that case fatality rate from Covid-19 is less than 1%. They compare it to a severe influenza.
As of right now, the most accurate count is 94,250 confirmed cases, 3,214 deaths. thats 3.41%. That number has been creeping up from the original 2%.

Other studies are not using facts, but assumptions . We have to go by the real numbers and not guess how many may not be reported. Of course, there are unreported cases as well as unreported deaths, but a guess is just that.

Its also true that older people who are often frail or have underlying illness are seeing 10-15% mortality while few children get it.

To get the facts and do the math yourself, check here. Its updated regularly, but will always be behind the exact numbers.

 

CanonFanBoy

Really O.K. Boomer
Jan 28, 2015
4,705
2,625
Irving, Texas
As of right now, the most accurate count is 94,250 confirmed cases, 3,214 deaths. thats 3.41%. That number has been creeping up from the original 2%.

Other studies are not using facts, but assumptions . We have to go by the real numbers and not guess how many may not be reported. Of course, there are unreported cases as well as unreported deaths, but a guess is just that.

Its also true that older people who are often frail or have underlying illness are seeing 10-15% mortality while few children get it.

To get the facts and do the math yourself, check here. Its updated regularly, but will always be behind the exact numbers.

The worst part of all this, for me, are the people saying, "Yeah, but it's just the old and the weak so it's not so bad" Sometimes I can hardly believe what I'm reading. Not necessarily here, but all over the web. The way some people word things sometimes indicates to me that it is going to get scarier the older I get. People seem to forget that they will also get old or weak one day. I see this attitude so much that I have stopped marveling at the fact that many seniors and disabled in nursing homes never get visitors, though they have family in the same town. Some of the sick and dying among us are truly alone. Very sad.
 

Architect1776

Defining the poetics of space through Architecture
Aug 18, 2017
532
482
118
Williamsport, PA
I'm not "believing" anything. That is the whole point. I'm not making any assumptions or beliefs about it the way that you are.

I'm accepting the fact that we don't know enough about this to be able to determine how dangerous it is or isn't at this point. So the prudent response is to exercise caution as if it is dangerous, because the cost of treating it as if it were not dangerous would be too great if it turns out that it is dangerous.

And honestly I don't care what you do unless it's specifically related to expertise in infectious diseases. And along with that, I am listening to the messaging coming from the CDC themselves, not the media's spin on it.
Whatever. :ROFLMAO: :ROFLMAO: :ROFLMAO:
 

Rule556

I see no reason for recording the obvious. -Weston
Dec 19, 2019
74
74
Seattle
www.flickr.com
I'm not "believing" anything. That is the whole point. I'm not making any assumptions or beliefs about it the way that you are.

I'm accepting the fact that we don't know enough about this to be able to determine how dangerous it is or isn't at this point. So the prudent response is to exercise caution as if it is dangerous, because the cost of treating it as if it were not dangerous would be too great if it turns out that it is dangerous.

And honestly I don't care what you do unless it's specifically related to expertise in infectious diseases. And along with that, I am listening to the messaging coming from the CDC themselves, not the media's spin on it.
Exactly. I hope it's just a tempest in a teapot, but I'm washing my hands like it's the black plague. I have worked in hazard mitigation, which is where my education was focused, and I know how bad a real pandemic could potentially get. I'd rather be careful than not. There's no need to panic, but there is need for people to be aware, be prepared, and do things in their daily life to lessen the potential spread of this virus. Regardless of how bad it ends up being in retrospect.
 
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YuengLinger

EOS 5D MK IV
Dec 20, 2012
2,836
1,065
Southeastern USA
Our family has 100% stopped eating out, and we are sending handwipes with the kids to school.

Wildly, we've just learned this week that the elementary schools in our county have long abandoned providing time or encouragement to kids to wash their hands before lunch--where pretty much 100% of kids are eating sandwiches at least once a week. These are government run schools. :rolleyes:

Now parents have started an email campaign that has already hit the local news, and hopefully we'll get some common sense practices implemented.
 

AlanF

Canon 5DSR II
Aug 16, 2012
6,371
4,579
Our family has 100% stopped eating out, and we are sending handwipes with the kids to school.

Wildly, we've just learned this week that the elementary schools in our county have long abandoned providing time or encouragement to kids to wash their hands before lunch--where pretty much 100% of kids are eating sandwiches at least once a week. These are government run schools. :rolleyes:

Now parents have started an email campaign that has already hit the local news, and hopefully we'll get some common sense practices implemented.
They will need to sanitise the keyboard or touchscreen for emailing.
 

YuengLinger

EOS 5D MK IV
Dec 20, 2012
2,836
1,065
Southeastern USA
They will need to sanitise the keyboard or touchscreen for emailing.
In any event, the dark cloud of the corona virus got the parents talking to the schoolboard, and the schoolboard might start at least talking about basic hygiene, something they abandoned some time ago. Whether it's to reduce the spread of a new virus or just the same old GI and flu bugs, handwashing is a basic element of civilization.
 
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AlanF

Canon 5DSR II
Aug 16, 2012
6,371
4,579
As of right now, the most accurate count is 94,250 confirmed cases, 3,214 deaths. thats 3.41%. That number has been creeping up from the original 2%.

Other studies are not using facts, but assumptions . We have to go by the real numbers and not guess how many may not be reported. Of course, there are unreported cases as well as unreported deaths, but a guess is just that.

Its also true that older people who are often frail or have underlying illness are seeing 10-15% mortality while few children get it.

To get the facts and do the math yourself, check here. Its updated regularly, but will always be behind the exact numbers.

The number of cases is probably significantly underestimated because of those with very mild cases who don’t realise they have had the virus. What is more real is that about 15% of 80-90 year olds don’t survive.
 
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Quirkz

EOS RP
Oct 30, 2014
232
167
At our local Costco here in Spokane, things like toilet paper, peanut butter, bottled water, crackers, cleaning wipes were almost gone by noon. Fear is a powerful thing, even if its irrational.
Very American in that peanut butter, like bottled water and toilet paper, is one of life’s necessities
 
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