Deep Sky Astrophotography

Valvebounce

EOS 5D SR
Apr 3, 2013
4,075
80
52
Isle of Wight
Thanks Jon.
I did try googling but the Ha came back as ‘hahnium (Ha)’ alternate name for Dubnium DB (105).
Is your Ha H for hydrogen, a for alpha emissions or some other naming convention.

Cheers, Graham.

Thanks, Graham!

For the acronyms, HOO stands for Hydrogen/Oxygen/Oxygen, or Ha/OIII/OIII. It is a particular kind of narrow band blend that gives a "natural" look from a color standpoint (hydrogen gas to reddish or pinkish, oxygen gas to a blue or cyan.)

SHO stands for Sulfer/Hydrogen/Oxygen or SII/Ha/OIII. This is another kind of narrow band blend that is definitely "false color" in that hydrogen-alpha, which is definitely a red emission, is mapped to green. This is also sometimes called the Hubble Palette, as it is the standard blending palette often used for official hubble image reproductions.

The underlying data here is the same...I've just blended the information in different ways to give it a different look.
 

jrista

EOL
Dec 3, 2011
5,341
21
jonrista.com
Thanks Jon.
I did try googling but the Ha came back as ‘hahnium (Ha)’ alternate name for Dubnium DB (105).
Is your Ha H for hydrogen, a for alpha emissions or some other naming convention.

Cheers, Graham.
Yes, Ha is hydrogen-alpha. I mentioned the full name in my post when I described how it was mapped to green in the SHO blend.

SII stands for Sulfur-II, and OIII stands for Oxygen-III, doubly ionized narrow band emissions from gaseous nebula.
 

Valvebounce

EOS 5D SR
Apr 3, 2013
4,075
80
52
Isle of Wight
Oops so you did, I missed that, sorry Jon.
Thanks for your patience.

Cheers, Graham.

Yes, Ha is hydrogen-alpha. I mentioned the full name in my post when I described how it was mapped to green in the SHO blend.

SII stands for Sulfur-II, and OIII stands for Oxygen-III, doubly ionized narrow band emissions from gaseous nebula.
 
Jul 12, 2017
100
64
Have not had much luck where I am (Brisbane, Australia) with the weather but finally had clear skies few nights ago and finally had the chance to attempt Orion for the first time this season.

Taken from the backyard in Bortle 6 light pollution and crescent moon in the sky (for the most part)

Canon 760D modified + 100L Macro tracked with Sky-Watcher Star Adventurer

Orion Wide by Tony, on Flickr

Orion, Running Man, Horsehead and Flame by Tony, on Flickr
 

Don Haines

Beware of cats with laser eyes!
Jun 4, 2012
7,877
1,207
Canada
Have not had much luck where I am (Brisbane, Australia) with the weather but finally had clear skies few nights ago and finally had the chance to attempt Orion for the first time this season.

Taken from the backyard in Bortle 6 light pollution and crescent moon in the sky (for the most part)

Canon 760D modified + 100L Macro tracked with Sky-Watcher Star Adventure
Nice!

I got an autoguider for my mount and have not had a clear night since November! It is shots like yours that keep me interested!
 
Reactions: basketballfreak6
Jul 12, 2017
100
64
Nice!

I got an autoguider for my mount and have not had a clear night since November! It is shots like yours that keep me interested!
Thanks Don! Hope weather clears up for you soon!

I've been doing everything unguided, actually a little frustrated at how finicky the Star Adventurer is with slightly heavier loads/longer focal lengths.

I know guiding will help but not sure if I should just bite the bullet and invest in a better mount.
 

Don Haines

Beware of cats with laser eyes!
Jun 4, 2012
7,877
1,207
Canada
Thanks Don! Hope weather clears up for you soon!

I've been doing everything unguided, actually a little frustrated at how finicky the Star Adventurer is with slightly heavier loads/longer focal lengths.

I know guiding will help but not sure if I should just bite the bullet and invest in a better mount.
I live about a two hour drive from a bortle 1 zone, and intend to spend some time there this summer. Right now, I am still learning.
 

rpt

EOS 5D MK IV
Mar 7, 2012
2,749
9
India
So this is my first try of the milky way core. Took it on the 10th of last month. 4 shots merged with Sequator. I obviously need to shoot again but thought that I would share.

Shot with my 5D3 and 24-105 @28mm at F/4
Shot 1: ISO 3200 20 sec
Shot 2: ISO 3200 13 sec
Shot 3: ISO 6400 13 sec
Shot 4: ISO 12800 13

Venus at bottom right. Jupiter top middle-ish. Saturn halfway between the two in the line segment.

Please comment. :)

183813
sec
 
Reactions: karishmab

Don Haines

Beware of cats with laser eyes!
Jun 4, 2012
7,877
1,207
Canada
Thanks Don! Hope weather clears up for you soon!

I've been doing everything unguided, actually a little frustrated at how finicky the Star Adventurer is with slightly heavier loads/longer focal lengths.

I know guiding will help but not sure if I should just bite the bullet and invest in a better mount.
I made a brass counterweight for mine, and the hole is off-centre so I can help balance the camera better.
 
Reactions: basketballfreak6

FramerMCB

Canon 40D & 7D
Sep 9, 2014
344
51
51
Living up in the Northwest, our availability of clear weather is limited to the summer, and then we have a lot of light contamination from Spokane, starting about 10 miles South of us. We are in the country, as far as the neighborhood, but not away from the city light.

I've been up in Northern British Columbia, 100 miles from anything but tiny villages, and its truly amazing what you can see on a clear night. Astrophotography would be a great hobby up there.
Eastern Oregon is also a great area for dark-night sky viewing/pictures. Especially the south-eastern corner of the state - south and east of Malheur Wildlife Refuge for example - think Owyhee river and/or Steens Mountain...
 
Jul 12, 2017
100
64
I made a brass counterweight for mine, and the hole is off-centre so I can help balance the camera better.
I've invested in a (relatively) cheap guiding setup since we last spoke. Haven't had much chance with it due to crappy weather we've been getting but with what little time I've had to muck around with it so far I seem to get pretty good results with 2 min subs on ~500mm FOV (crop body + 200mm + 1.4x TC) on the Star Adventurer.