Does Lightroom 6.0 Support the R and RP cameras ?

rjbray01

Canon Forever
Jan 19, 2017
132
75
Hi, being a bit stingy here, but I don't have a subscription to Adobe, but make do with Lightroom 6.0 for which I paid a one-off license fee.

I'm wondering whether upgrading to the new world of Full Frame Mirrorless Cameras will mean I also have to move to the Adobe Subscription Model.

Could anyone enlighten me on the implications of going to the R and RP as far as Lightroom subscriptions are concerned ?

many thanks
 

Labdoc

EOS 80D
Mar 23, 2016
130
18
60
USA
Hi, being a bit stingy here, but I don't have a subscription to Adobe, but make do with Lightroom 6.0 for which I paid a one-off license fee.

I'm wondering whether upgrading to the new world of Full Frame Mirrorless Cameras will mean I also have to move to the Adobe Subscription Model.

Could anyone enlighten me on the implications of going to the R and RP as far as Lightroom subscriptions are concerned ?

many thanks
Yeah, RAW, camera profiles and lens data is constantly updated for each new camera release on subscription. Might take a few weeks or longer after product release. The way around is to to use another RAW converter like the one Canon provides and bring those files (tif, etc) into LR. I have no problem with the subscription but others do, just a choice.
 

OneSnark

Canon Fanboy
Aug 20, 2019
29
10
I am sure you can confirm if the R or RP are supported by V6 Lightroom. I suspect not?

If not. . .you have a few choices;
1) Convert RAWs to DNG using any number of converters (such as DPP?)
2) or . . .if your issue is the subscription model (as opposed to just shelling out money). . .you could change your basic software.

I am a (2) guy. I won't go subscription. That's crazy talk. . . however, I don't have a problem shelling out a top flight program.. . .say. . .Capture One. A bit steep; but it's "one time". There are other choices as well.
 

Mt Spokane Photography

I post too Much on Here!!
Mar 25, 2011
15,525
754
They will not be supported directly by ver6, but its easy to use Canon DPP to convert them into a tiff file that can be edited in LR 6. Raw files are basically tiff files with additional information flags that tell a editing software about camera settings. Generally, you don't need that data, so a tiff file is fine.

The second method is to convert them to a DNG file. DNG files are also tiff, but have their own set of flags to describe the camera settings. Not all software will edit a DNG file, and not all will edit a tiff file, but its more universal.

Both are basically raw files. BTW, Adobe owns the tiff specification, so you can't get away from using them unless you shoot jpeg.
 

LDS

EOR R
Sep 14, 2012
1,578
152
Raw files are basically tiff files with additional information flags that tell a editing software about camera settings. Generally, you don't need that data, so a tiff file is fine.
While the file internal format can be alike, a RAW file contains the original data before demosaicing. When converted to a "standard" TIFF file will contain a demosaiced RGB image. Keeping the original RAW data allows to apply different or improved demosaicing algorithms to images - that's impossible after the images have been converted to RGB.

It may be important for some people, not for others. For an example of how different demosaicing algorithm may work see https://rawpedia.rawtherapee.com/Demosaicing. I do not know if Lightroom apply different algorithms beyond the camera/sensor used, analyzing other image characteristics (i.e. ISO).

But as machine learning (also called AI) is more and more employed in image processing, I can foresee improvements in this area too.

Also, when converting to TIFF, to keep RAW-like image processing capabilities, files should be 16 bit (or floating point, but it may be less supported) and using a large enough color space. Files become larger, but they ensure there's enough room to minimize losses while processing images, especially when images have a high dynamic and colors range.
 
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Michael Clark

Now we see through a glass, darkly...
Apr 5, 2016
1,049
499
They will not be supported directly by ver6, but its easy to use Canon DPP to convert them into a tiff file that can be edited in LR 6. Raw files are basically tiff files with additional information flags that tell a editing software about camera settings. Generally, you don't need that data, so a tiff file is fine.

The second method is to convert them to a DNG file. DNG files are also tiff, but have their own set of flags to describe the camera settings. Not all software will edit a DNG file, and not all will edit a tiff file, but its more universal.

Both are basically raw files. BTW, Adobe owns the tiff specification, so you can't get away from using them unless you shoot jpeg.
Not really. Although raw files typically use a TIFF container, the information they contain is different.

Raw files have a single, monochromatic luminance value for each sensel on the sensor. The TIFF files you get when you convert a Canon .cr2 file using DPP to 16-bit TIFF have an RGB value for each pixel in the image. Yes, there's a lot more latitude doing additional post processing with a 16-bit RGB TIFF than with an 8-bit JPEG, but the black point, whitepoint, and WB have already been "baked in" to a degree. Some of the information in the raw file has been irrevocably discarded.

Converting to DNG using Adobe's convertor strips much of the "maker notes" section of the EXIF and ignores the information the "maker notes" contains. This includes, for example, the information from masked pixels on the sensor as well as other proprietary information that Canon's raw conversion engine uses. If you're then only going to use Adobe products to process the DNG files, it doesn't really matter, though. If you import .cr2 files that are compatible with your version of Adobe products directly into LR/PS, those Adobe products ignore that information anyway.
 

rjbray01

Canon Forever
Jan 19, 2017
132
75
They will not be supported directly by ver6, but its easy to use Canon DPP to convert them into a tiff file that can be edited in LR 6. Raw files are basically tiff files with additional information flags that tell a editing software about camera settings. Generally, you don't need that data, so a tiff file is fine.

The second method is to convert them to a DNG file. DNG files are also tiff, but have their own set of flags to describe the camera settings. Not all software will edit a DNG file, and not all will edit a tiff file, but its more universal.

Both are basically raw files. BTW, Adobe owns the tiff specification, so you can't get away from using them unless you shoot jpeg.
Thanks very much indeed - that is very informative and helpful