Double shutter sound on the R

YuengLinger

EOS 5D MK IV
Dec 20, 2012
2,645
767
Southeastern USA
Horrible bokeh, less blur, weird things going on in the blured areas. I didn't know the R was default set to Mode 1 and it ruined my two first shoots.
I'm not seeing it with the rf 50mm f/1.2L. But I haven't compared what am getting (and loving) to "Disabled."
Are you sure this was the issue and no other factor?
 

Viggo

EOS 5D SR
Dec 13, 2010
4,240
797
I'm not seeing it with the rf 50mm f/1.2L. But I haven't compared what am getting (and loving) to "Disabled."
Are you sure this was the issue and no other factor?
Absolutely sure. Shoot something at 1/4000s f1.2 and with a slightly busy background with Mode 1 and Disable, it looks like you’ve stopped down and it looks gritty with mode 1.
From the manual :
 

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Ramage

EOS M50
Aug 27, 2019
37
28
Absolutely sure. Shoot something at 1/4000s f1.2 and with a slightly busy background with Mode 1 and Disable, it looks like you’ve stopped down and it looks gritty with mode 1.
From the manual :
So it is slightly situational but why risk it. I am going to get used to the double shutter sound.

Thanks Viggo
 

highdesertmesa

EOS T7i
Apr 17, 2017
70
43
Placitas, NM
www.flickr.com
This thread is all over the map.

Default shutter on R is EFCS or electronic front curtain shutter (Silent LV shoot – enabled).

EFCS avoids shutter shock similar to using mirror lockup on a DSLR. The front curtain on a mirrorless camera carries most of the vibration, so EFCS gives you the best of both worlds by using electronic front curtain with a mechanical rear curtain (thereby avoiding the possible rolling shutter with full electronic/silent).

Where EFCS is problematic is when shooting wide aperture at shutter speeds over 1/500 of a second. In such cases, you may see bokeh artifacts (sharp edges to blur areas), reduced bokeh (f/1.2 blur may appear as f/1.4 blur), or partial reduction in bokeh (ex: half of frame appears normal at f/1.2 but other half has reduced bokeh).

Full mechanical shutter (Silent LV shoot – disabled) should be used over 1/500 sec if you're shooting at wide apertures in bright light. Otherwise, keep it on EFCS. This is the mode where you will hear what sounds like two exposures being taken – both front and rear curtains are moving. The slower the shutter speed the more pronounced this auditory effect will be. At fast shutter speeds it sounds close to EFCS.

Canon should not have named these things so cryptically they way they would on a consumer-oriented Rebel. Call them what they are, Canon. I suspect they may change the labeling with the coming high-res and 1D-class R bodies.

Canon also could help us out by doing what Fujifilm already does – giving the option for "extended" modes where you can automatically switch from EFCS to mechanical shutter over 1/600 sec. with the additional option to move to full electronic/silent shutter once the exposure requires a faster shutter speed than the mechanical shutter can reach (either 1/4000 or 1/8000 sec. depending on the model.). This full extended mode automatically moves from EFCS to mechanical to electronic allowing the photographer to avoid EFCS bokeh artifacts or blow the exposure when exceeding 1/4000 or 1/8000 second in bright light.
 
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highdesertmesa

EOS T7i
Apr 17, 2017
70
43
Placitas, NM
www.flickr.com
So it is slightly situational but why risk it. I am going to get used to the double shutter sound.

Thanks Viggo
Even on a tripod the full mechanical shutter can cause micro-blur from vibration inside the camera, especially with longer shutter speeds. If you're shooting at 1/125 and higher, you'll probably never see the shutter shock, but be aware you may run into sharpness issues at 1:1 viewing/large prints if not in EFCS mode.
 
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Ramage

EOS M50
Aug 27, 2019
37
28
This thread is all over the map.

Default shutter on R is EFCS or electronic front curtain shutter (Silent LV shoot – enabled).

EFCS avoids shutter shock similar to using mirror lockup on a DSLR. The front curtain on a mirrorless camera carries most of the vibration, so EFCS gives you the best of both worlds by using electronic front curtain with a mechanical rear curtain (thereby avoiding the possible rolling shutter with full electronic/silent).

Where EFCS is problematic is when shooting wide aperture at shutter speeds over 1/500 of a second. In such cases, you may see bokeh artifacts (sharp edges to blur areas), reduced bokeh (f/1.2 blur may appear as f/1.4 blur), or partial reduction in bokeh (ex: half of frame appears normal at f/1.2 but other half has reduced bokeh).

Full mechanical shutter (Silent LV shoot – disabled) should be used over 1/500 sec if you're shooting at wide apertures in bright light. Otherwise, keep it on EFCS. This is the mode where you will hear what sounds like two exposures being taken – both front and rear curtains are moving. The slower the shutter speed the more pronounced this auditory effect will be. At fast shutter speeds it sounds close to EFCS.

Canon should not have named these things so cryptically they way they would on a consumer-oriented Rebel. Call them what they are, Canon. I suspect they may change the labeling with the coming high-res and 1D-class R bodies.

Canon also could help us out by doing what Fujifilm already does – giving the option for "extended" modes where you can automatically switch from EFCS to mechanical shutter over 1/600 sec. with the additional option to move to full electronic/silent shutter once the exposure requires a faster shutter speed than the mechanical shutter can reach (either 1/4000 or 1/8000 sec. depending on the model.). This full extended mode automatically moves from EFCS to mechanical to electronic allowing the photographer to avoid EFCS bokeh artifacts or blow the exposure when exceeding 1/4000 or 1/8000 second in bright light.
Thank you for that very detailed explanation!!!

I have to agree, the terminology that Canon is using does not help clarify the modes in any meaningful way.
 
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