EOS RP, R and shutter speed

Feb 13, 2020
4
1
Hi everyone!
Recent announcements on the development of more RF lenses got me decided to enter the EOS R community.

At first, for a mostly photography usage, the RP and the price point was a good option. But, I basically aim to only use fixed focal with large apertures, hoping for a 24mm at 1.4 in the future...!

My question is, is the max shutter speed of the RP at 1/4000 would be limitating the performance/use of large apertures?

Thank you for your help!
L.
 

mistaspeedy

EOS RP
Apr 5, 2015
235
6
I just tried out my Sigma 135mm F1.8 lens on my EOS R in direct sunlight. Wide open at F1.8, if I am shooting something light colored in direct sunlight, even 1/8000 is overexposed. However, pointing the camera at subjects that are not as light, 1/4000 seems to be enough. So it seems that if you must have F1.4 in full sunlight, an ND filter is necessary if shooting bright subjects, no matter the camera. However, the EOS R will give you more flexibility in that regard letting in only half as much light with the 1/8000 shutter.
 

padam

EOS 7D MK II
Aug 26, 2015
686
289
In short: if you shoot f/1.4 at full daylight, yes, the 1/8000s shutter and the extra dynamic range of the EOS R sensor are both helpful over the RP.
 
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CanonFanBoy

O.K. Boomer
Jan 28, 2015
4,555
2,368
Irving, Texas
My question is, is the max shutter speed of the RP at 1/4000 would be limitating the performance/use of large apertures?
Yes.

In bright sunlight you might consider using an ND filter so that you can keep the shallow depth of field you want (wide aperture) and to get the shutter speed within limits for the exposure you want.

The below photo was taken with the RF 85mm f/1.2L. I used a 6 stop ND filter to get below 1/8000 sec on the R and was also stopped down to f/1.8. The shutter speed was 1/1250 sec. so a less heavy ND could have been used.

So with ND filters the RP is fine.
 

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Feb 13, 2020
4
1
I just tried out my Sigma 135mm F1.8 lens on my EOS R in direct sunlight. Wide open at F1.8, if I am shooting something light colored in direct sunlight, even 1/8000 is overexposed. However, pointing the camera at subjects that are not as light, 1/4000 seems to be enough. So it seems that if you must have F1.4 in full sunlight, an ND filter is necessary if shooting bright subjects, no matter the camera. However, the EOS R will give you more flexibility in that regard letting in only half as much light with the 1/8000 shutter.
Thank you for your precise information!
I never considered having a ND filter but the more I learn in photography, the more I want to invest in ;)
 
Feb 13, 2020
4
1
In short: if you shoot f/1.4 at full daylight, yes, the 1/8000s shutter and the extra dynamic range of the EOS R sensor are both helpful over the RP.
As I will only have one camera, RP or R, yes, maybe I need to consider that! Thank you :)
 
Feb 13, 2020
4
1
Yes.

In bright sunlight you might consider using an ND filter so that you can keep the shallow depth of field you want (wide aperture) and to get the shutter speed within limits for the exposure you want.

The below photo was taken with the RF 85mm f/1.2L. I used a 6 stop ND filter to get below 1/8000 sec on the R and was also stopped down to f/1.8. The shutter speed was 1/1250 sec. so a less heavy ND could have been used.

So with ND filters the RP is fine.
OMG, amazing photo that got me more excited to buy this camera! And thanks for the ND filter advise again, never considered having one but seems to be necessary for 99% of my use.
 
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CanonFanBoy

O.K. Boomer
Jan 28, 2015
4,555
2,368
Irving, Texas
OMG, amazing photo that got me more excited to buy this camera! And thanks for the ND filter advise again, never considered having one but seems to be necessary for 99% of my use.
Off camera flash was also used. Off camera flash, position of the OCF, and how you expose the background independent of the flash makes a huge difference with portraits. If you will be using off camera flash I would recommend a single Flashpoint eVolve200 Pro (to start) and skip the speedlites. Join the website fstoppers and also look for an off camera flash group in your geographical area to begin learning. Ultimately, how you handle lighting and composition will be far more important than what lenses/camera you have.
 

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Mt Spokane Photography

I post too Much on Here!!
Mar 25, 2011
15,636
827
One issue with mirrorless is that there can be issues when wide apertures and fast shutter speeds are used with a electronic shutter (Silent live view shooting). Its better with the standard mechanical shutter, but still a issue for some. This is mentioned in the manual for my "R".
 

navastronia

EOS RP + 5D Classic
Aug 31, 2018
379
418
One issue with mirrorless is that there can be issues when wide apertures and fast shutter speeds are used with a electronic shutter (Silent live view shooting). Its better with the standard mechanical shutter, but still a issue for some. This is mentioned in the manual for my "R".
IIRC, this is actually an issue with Electronic Front-Curtain Shutter, not Electronic Shutter.

 
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