Glasses on or off?

Valvebounce

EOS 5D SR
Apr 3, 2013
4,091
91
52
Isle of Wight
Hi Folks.
I am the “designated” photographer for a relatives wedding via the “you have lots of nice camera gear” method of selection! ::)
I have done a couple of friends / family weddings already but I find I dislike the no eyes behind glasses look especially as this venue the shots will probably end up outdoors with darkened lenses in their glasses.
Is it recommended to ask people to remove their glasses?
What if they wear glasses full time and you have never seen them without glasses, would that be weird?
What are people’s thoughts on this please?
I wear glasses full time but would not be bothered if asked to remove them, I had to for my passport after all! ;D

Cheers, Graham.

Wow, I’m seeing all these people view an opinion related question and not one opinion shared! :eek: ;D
I need to know your thoughts or “opinion” on this! ;D ;D Everyone has one right? ;)
 

Kit.

EOS 6D MK II
Apr 25, 2011
864
354
Honestly, my opinion is that they should hire a professional photographer if they expect their wedding to be "once in a lifetime" event and want it to be represented in pictures.

You shouldn't expect people to take off glasses outdoors. It may be unsafe for some of them.
 

Jim Saunders

EOS 6D MK II
Sep 9, 2012
1,125
14
hhaphoto.com
If their glasses are part of their normal appearance leave them on. You can lift up the arms from their ears a little if you can see your flash in the lenses.

Jim
 

old-pr-pix

EOS RP
Dec 26, 2011
369
21
Outdoor formal posed shots definitely look best without dark glasses. Folks with 'transitions' style lenses can be asked to keep them in their pocket 'til instant before you shoot. That way they will not have turned dark yet. (Newer lenses may be too fast to have this trick work.) Some people are quite sensitive so respect their needs. Otherwise give the option to remove sunglasses. Candid shots with sunglasses or dark lenses are usually fine.
 

Valvebounce

EOS 5D SR
Apr 3, 2013
4,091
91
52
Isle of Wight
Hi Kit.
I really wish they could afford a pro, I’m not too comfortable with the pressure of being the designated photographer, I realise the responsibility but this is definitely a wedding on a budget, registry office and a pub afterwards, byob! The couple have been together years and have a child together and just decided to make it official!
Thank you for your thoughts on the glasses, I hadn’t even thought about the possibility of a risk, however I do know that none of them would comply if they were at risk (or just don’t want to!), I don’t carry any authority, I’m only family after all! ;D ;D

Cheers, Graham.

Kit. said:
Honestly, my opinion is that they should hire a professional photographer if they expect their wedding to be "once in a lifetime" event and want it to be represented in pictures.

You shouldn't expect people to take off glasses outdoors. It may be unsafe for some of them.
 

Valvebounce

EOS 5D SR
Apr 3, 2013
4,091
91
52
Isle of Wight
Hi pcaouolte, Jim.
Thanks for your input, probably a choice is best, thank you for the tip on raising the arms to drop the reflection out of shot.
I scouted the location today, brick wall, scorched grass, tarmac and concrete paths and a small area with some trees which has access to both sides, I’m hoping to use this as a location providing some dappled shade and a more pleasing natural backdrop and hopefully it will help stop reactive lenses being too dark.

Cheers, Graham.

pcaouolte said:
You could give your subjects the choice. Tell them that their glasses are dark in the photos and ask if they would like to remove them?
Jim Saunders said:
If their glasses are part of their normal appearance leave them on. You can lift up the arms from their ears a little if you can see your flash in the lenses.

Jim
 

Don Haines

Beware of cats with laser eyes!
Jun 4, 2012
7,895
1,245
Canada
If asked by the event photographer to remove my glasses, I would ignore them and leave my glasses on... I ALWAYS! wear my glasses. I am on the edge of legally blind without them..... they are stayin* on, or I am leaving. This is not open for discussion!

I am equally sure that there are others who will react the same.... Asking people to remove sunglasses is fine for those wearing for cosmetic reasons, but those who need glasses to see are not going to comply, so be very careful how you ask the question, and if someone appears to be ignoring the request,they may have a good reason.
 

Valvebounce

EOS 5D SR
Apr 3, 2013
4,091
91
52
Isle of Wight
Hi old-pr-pix.
Thanks for another good tip, yes, modern reactive lenses are fast, real fast! Absolutely respect needs.
Like you I have no issue with candid shots with glasses.

Cheers, Graham.

old-pr-pix said:
Outdoor formal posed shots definitely look best without dark glasses. Folks with 'transitions' style lenses can be asked to keep them in their pocket 'til instant before you shoot. That way they will not have turned dark yet. (Newer lenses may be too fast to have this trick work.) Some people are quite sensitive so respect their needs. Otherwise give the option to remove sunglasses. Candid shots with sunglasses or dark lenses are usually fine.
 

Valvebounce

EOS 5D SR
Apr 3, 2013
4,091
91
52
Isle of Wight
Hi Don.
Thank you for your perspective on this situation, I hope I didn’t come across as some kind of ogre that was about to insist on glasses off or no photo! :eek:
I asked the question so that I could enter into the situation better informed, and thanks to the advice I have received I feel this has been achieved.
This forum is great not only due to the knowledge and skills of the members here but because they are willing to share that knowledge freely with 5hose of us that ask, for that I thank you all.

Cheers, Graham.

Don Haines said:
If asked by the event photographer to remove my glasses, I would ignore them and leave my glasses on... I ALWAYS! wear my glasses. I am on the edge of legally blind without them..... they are stayin* on, or I am leaving. This is not open for discussion!

I am equally sure that there are others who will react the same.... Asking people to remove sunglasses is fine for those wearing for cosmetic reasons, but those who need glasses to see are not going to comply, so be very careful how you ask the question, and if someone appears to be ignoring the request,they may have a good reason.
 

Don Haines

Beware of cats with laser eyes!
Jun 4, 2012
7,895
1,245
Canada
Valvebounce said:
Hi Don.
Thank you for your perspective on this situation, I hope I didn’t come across as some kind of ogre that was about to insist on glasses off or no photo! :eek:
I asked the question so that I could enter into the situation better informed, and thanks to the advice I have received I feel this has been achieved.
This forum is great not only due to the knowledge and skills of the members here but because they are willing to share that knowledge freely with 5hose of us that ask, for that I thank you all.

Cheers, Graham.

Don Haines said:
If asked by the event photographer to remove my glasses, I would ignore them and leave my glasses on... I ALWAYS! wear my glasses. I am on the edge of legally blind without them..... they are stayin* on, or I am leaving. This is not open for discussion!

I am equally sure that there are others who will react the same.... Asking people to remove sunglasses is fine for those wearing for cosmetic reasons, but those who need glasses to see are not going to comply, so be very careful how you ask the question, and if someone appears to be ignoring the request,they may have a good reason.
I can’t see you being an ogre.... but I have run into them in the past...

What I have done in this situation has been to ask the people with glasses to imagine that their glasses are mirrors, and to angle their heads so that they will not reflect the flash(s) back at the camera.... so far, it’s worked.... and when I have said that, so far everyone with sunglasses has taken them off without being asked....

When shooting with natural light, a polarizing filter helps a lot.
 

AJ

EOS 7D MK II
Sep 11, 2010
605
10
If the ceremony is in a harshly lit area and people are wearing sunglasses then so be it.
For formals you should scope out ahead of time an area where the light is not as harsh (shade)
 

Valvebounce

EOS 5D SR
Apr 3, 2013
4,091
91
52
Isle of Wight
Hi Don.
Thanks for the tip of a polarising filter but I am expecting to use a bit of fill flash in the shadow of the trees, don’t think I want to be subjecting the guests to standing out in harsh midday sun, nor producing images in such harsh lighting, my understanding is that a polarising filter will not work with on axis lighting such as a flash though I guess it might still help reduce the reflections from the ambient light, I guess I’m then into a spiral, more flash power to overcome the polariser, then brighter reflections overpowering the polariser!
I will have to have the YN600EX-RT II mounted on the camera unless I can get my assistant (Angela) to hold it. ;D I have stands etc but this is not the location to be messing with that.
I fanally got a list of shots required after continuous variations on whatever you get! ::)

Cheers, Graham.

Don Haines said:
I can’t see you being an ogre.... but I have run into them in the past...

What I have done in this situation has been to ask the people with glasses to imagine that their glasses are mirrors, and to angle their heads so that they will not reflect the flash(s) back at the camera.... so far, it’s worked.... and when I have said that, so far everyone with sunglasses has taken them off without being asked....

When shooting with natural light, a polarizing filter helps a lot.
 

Valvebounce

EOS 5D SR
Apr 3, 2013
4,091
91
52
Isle of Wight
Hi AJ.
I did scope out an area, but the registry office is in the middle of a car park on the edge of scorched grass playing fields and I’m not confident I can get everyone (especially the mother in law) to walk the 100 yards to the shade of the trees mentioned above! :(
I’m slowly making peace with the notion of sunglasses vs squinting! :)

Cheers, Graham.

AJ said:
If the ceremony is in a harshly lit area and people are wearing sunglasses then so be it.
For formals you should scope out ahead of time an area where the light is not as harsh (shade)
 

pwp

EOS 5D MK IV
Oct 25, 2010
2,517
7
Glasses vs no glasses? One of the skills of a successful events photographer is the ability to make hundreds of tiny though ultimately relevant decisions on the fly, most of them will be purely intuitive, based on experience.

Anywhere in life, not just covering an event, the best way to get someone to do something is by agreement. Bring your lovable and wise human side to the job and agreement usually flows your way. Apply this on a case by case basis to the glasses issue. Trust your intuition. If there is resistance to a gentle suggestion, don't worry about it and get on with your shot. Say with a group shot, you could turn it on its head and suggest everyone put on their sunglasses for a Blues Brothers look which they'll have fun with, then in the next heartbeat say "now let's do one with no glasses!" Make it a game.

As an aside on transition glasses, I got my first pair a couple of years ago, persuaded by my optometrist. They're great most of the time, except when you're working outside or in a bright environment. The darkened lenses do two annoying things, you've got a dimmer viewfinder, and worse, you can make false assessments of image exposure when checking your camera monitor. Now I just leave the transitions in the car, and got another pair of glasses with regular lenses which are now my default pair.

-pw
 

Valvebounce

EOS 5D SR
Apr 3, 2013
4,091
91
52
Isle of Wight
Hi pwp.
Great suggestion, I like the Blues Brothers idea.
I have never given it a thought about why I sometimes have trouble in bright sun, I have transition lenses! I don’t think I can afford 2 pars of prescription glasses, (a good chunk of the next lens I’d like) I just keep the last pair as an emergency backup in case of catastrophe!

Cheers, Graham.

pwp said:
Glasses vs no glasses? One of the skills of a successful events photographer is the ability to make hundreds of tiny though ultimately relevant decisions on the fly, most of them will be purely intuitive, based on experience.

Anywhere in life, not just covering an event, the best way to get someone to do something is by agreement. Bring your lovable and wise human side to the job and agreement usually flows your way. Apply this on a case by case basis to the glasses issue. Trust your intuition. If there is resistance to a gentle suggestion, don't worry about it and get on with your shot. Say with a group shot, you could turn it on its head and suggest everyone put on their sunglasses for a Blues Brothers look which they'll have fun with, then in the next heartbeat say "now let's do one with no glasses!" Make it a game.

As an aside on transition glasses, I got my first pair a couple of years ago, persuaded by my optometrist. They're great most of the time, except when you're working outside or in a bright environment. The darkened lenses do two annoying things, you've got a dimmer viewfinder, and worse, you can make false assessments of image exposure when checking your camera monitor. Now I just leave the transitions in the car, and got another pair of glasses with regular lenses which are now my default pair.

-pw
 

scottkinfw

Wildlife photography is my passion
Valvebounce said:
Hi Folks.
I am the “designated” photographer for a relatives wedding via the “you have lots of nice camera gear” method of selection! ::)
I have done a couple of friends / family weddings already but I find I dislike the no eyes behind glasses look especially as this venue the shots will probably end up outdoors with darkened lenses in their glasses.
Is it recommended to ask people to remove their glasses?
What if they wear glasses full time and you have never seen them without glasses, would that be weird?
What are people’s thoughts on this please?
I wear glasses full time but would not be bothered if asked to remove them, I had to for my passport after all! ;D

Why not let them decide how they best feel comfortable being immortalized? Try shooting them in the shade under some trees.

Alternatively, take one with and one without.

Scott

Cheers, Graham.

Wow, I’m seeing all these people view an opinion related question and not one opinion shared! :eek: ;D
I need to know your thoughts or “opinion” on this! ;D ;D Everyone has one right? ;)
 

scottkinfw

Wildlife photography is my passion
Valvebounce said:
Hi Kit.
I really wish they could afford a pro, I’m not too comfortable with the pressure of being the designated photographer, I realise the responsibility but this is definitely a wedding on a budget, registry office and a pub afterwards, byob! The couple have been together years and have a child together and just decided to make it official!
Thank you for your thoughts on the glasses, I hadn’t even thought about the possibility of a risk, however I do know that none of them would comply if they were at risk (or just don’t want to!), I don’t carry any authority, I’m only family after all! ;D ;D

Cheers, Graham.

Kit. said:
Honestly, my opinion is that they should hire a professional photographer if they expect their wedding to be "once in a lifetime" event and want it to be represented in pictures.

You shouldn't expect people to take off glasses outdoors. It may be unsafe for some of them.
I have shot a few weddings but ONLY as second shooter and NEVER taking money. That relieved me of the stress of producing a professional product. Why don't you get a friend or three who are good with a camera so that you should get at least a couple of shots that would be at least good.

Just a thought. It would take the pressure off.

Scott
 

Valvebounce

EOS 5D SR
Apr 3, 2013
4,091
91
52
Isle of Wight
Hi Scott.
I am not and never have taken any money either, I do however feel obliged to do my best and although none of the previous wedding photograph recipients has been anything other than thrilled with the shots I am my worst critic and often feel I could / should have done better, got the composition better, got the lighting better etc. My best compliment was when a relative that had a pro shooter used a shot I took for their framed picture on the wall and yes I was mindful of the pro trying to do her job and didn’t get in her way and did ask if she was ok with me taking shots of the pertinent moments.
Re the friends, the two guys I do photography with would be a distraction as I would end up having to assist / direct them.

Cheers, Graham.

scottkinfw said:
Valvebounce said:
Hi Kit.
I really wish they could afford a pro, I’m not too comfortable with the pressure of being the designated photographer, I realise the responsibility but this is definitely a wedding on a budget, registry office and a pub afterwards, byob! The couple have been together years and have a child together and just decided to make it official!
Thank you for your thoughts on the glasses, I hadn’t even thought about the possibility of a risk, however I do know that none of them would comply if they were at risk (or just don’t want to!), I don’t carry any authority, I’m only family after all! ;D ;D

Cheers, Graham.

Kit. said:
Honestly, my opinion is that they should hire a professional photographer if they expect their wedding to be "once in a lifetime" event and want it to be represented in pictures.

You shouldn't expect people to take off glasses outdoors. It may be unsafe for some of them.
I have shot a few weddings but ONLY as second shooter and NEVER taking money. That relieved me of the stress of producing a professional product. Why don't you get a friend or three who are good with a camera so that you should get at least a couple of shots that would be at least good.

Just a thought. It would take the pressure off.

Scott
 

Valvebounce

EOS 5D SR
Apr 3, 2013
4,091
91
52
Isle of Wight
Hi Folks.
Well the wedding went off ok, I asked for dark lenses to be removed and many did lift or remove them, I also got a couple of “nah bollocks” so I just let it go and got on with it.
Learned another lesson too, shooting a 1DsIII in a small room will make nervous people jump! :eek: ;D Swapped to the 7DII on silent shutter, no more jumping!
Thanks for the advice.

Cheers, Graham.