Glasses on or off?

jd7

EOS 7D MK II
Feb 3, 2013
692
78
Valvebounce said:
Hi Folks.
Well the wedding went off ok, I asked for dark lenses to be removed and many did lift or remove them, I also got a couple of “nah bollocks” so I just let it go and got on with it.
Learned another lesson too, shooting a 1DsIII in a small room will make nervous people jump! :eek: ;D Swapped to the 7DII on silent shutter, no more jumping!
Thanks for the advice.

Cheers, Graham.
So do we get to see any shots? :)
 

Valvebounce

EOS 5D SR
Apr 3, 2013
4,046
74
52
Isle of Wight
Hi Jd7.
Yes of course once I have sorted them. :) I re-learned another thing (again for the umpteenth time ::)) when using two cameras don’t forget to sync the time, :-[ I now need to remember how to batch correct the time on 1 set of shots by just shy of 1 minute! ::) I’m sure once I open the software and start looking it will slowly come back to me how to do it.

Cheers, Graham.

jd7 said:
Valvebounce said:
Hi Folks.
Well the wedding went off ok, I asked for dark lenses to be removed and many did lift or remove them, I also got a couple of “nah bollocks” so I just let it go and got on with it.
Learned another lesson too, shooting a 1DsIII in a small room will make nervous people jump! :eek: ;D Swapped to the 7DII on silent shutter, no more jumping!
Thanks for the advice.

Cheers, Graham.
So do we get to see any shots? :)
 

Don Haines

Beware of cats with laser eyes!
Jun 4, 2012
7,759
1,002
Canada
Valvebounce said:
:) I re-learned another thing (again for the umpteenth time ::)) when using two cameras don’t forget to sync the time, :-[ I now need to remember how to batch correct the time on 1 set of shots by just shy of 1 minute! ::) I’m sure once I open the software and start looking it will slowly come back to me how to do it.

I would be embarrassed to tell you how many times I have learned the same lesson, but thanks for teaching it to me again..... I just set my clocks for tomorrow's shoot. Thanks!
 

stevelee

FT-QL
Jul 6, 2017
922
113
Davidson, NC
I forgot to set the clock in my DSLR before I took pictures of the eclipse in August. After the fact, but on the same day, I compared the camera time to that on my iPhone and got the delta within a few seconds. For posting the pictures, I definitely wanted to put the time taken. On the page I also gave the location longitude and latitude as well as the local solar time of totality, almost exactly an hour and a half earlier than EDT. Of course from EDT one can easily figure GMT. In this case the main interest for local solar time was that it meant the sun was high in the sky throughout the duration of the eclipse.
 

Valvebounce

EOS 5D SR
Apr 3, 2013
4,046
74
52
Isle of Wight
Hi Don.
You are welcome, glad I could help! ;D
Have a good shoot.

Cheers, Graham.

Don Haines said:
Valvebounce said:
:) I re-learned another thing (again for the umpteenth time ::)) when using two cameras don’t forget to sync the time, :-[ I now need to remember how to batch correct the time on 1 set of shots by just shy of 1 minute! ::) I’m sure once I open the software and start looking it will slowly come back to me how to do it.

I would be embarrassed to tell you how many times I have learned the same lesson, but thanks for teaching it to me again..... I just set my clocks for tomorrow's shoot. Thanks!
 

foo

EOS T7i
Sep 10, 2016
77
0
Don Haines said:
When shooting with natural light, a polarizing filter helps a lot.
Good luck.. My prescription sunglasses are... polarised... and I wouldn't be taking them off either. You could be lucky and get an angle that doesn't make them totally black, but they're pretty dark anyway.

Folks like us who wear them permanently ain't going to take them off, although I'd certainly try to angle them so as not to cause a problem. Hey, if I'm in the photo maybe I want to be seen!

My normal specs are frameless which adds to the fun :)

Now being behind the lens with polarised specs and a polarising filter is a whole different problem..
 

stevelee

FT-QL
Jul 6, 2017
922
113
Davidson, NC
foo said:
Folks like us who wear them permanently ain't going to take them off, although I'd certainly try to angle them so as not to cause a problem. Hey, if I'm in the photo maybe I want to be seen!

My normal specs are frameless which adds to the fun :)
But it doesn't sound like you wear sunglasses permanently. Why wouldn't you just change to your regular glasses to be seen in the picture?
 

slclick

You want DR? Go to Punta Cana
Dec 17, 2013
2,773
179
I just saw the title of this thread and thought 'Oh no, another diopter post'
 

Don Haines

Beware of cats with laser eyes!
Jun 4, 2012
7,759
1,002
Canada
foo said:
Don Haines said:
When shooting with natural light, a polarizing filter helps a lot.
Good luck.. My prescription sunglasses are... polarised... and I wouldn't be taking them off either. You could be lucky and get an angle that doesn't make them totally black, but they're pretty dark anyway.

Folks like us who wear them permanently ain't going to take them off, although I'd certainly try to angle them so as not to cause a problem. Hey, if I'm in the photo maybe I want to be seen!

My normal specs are frameless which adds to the fun :)

Now being behind the lens with polarised specs and a polarising filter is a whole different problem..
With the glasses off, I am straddling the line for legally blind.... if I take off my glasses you end up with a really tall bald guy squinting and wondering where that noise came from :)

I try to angle my head to avoid reflections
 

stevelee

FT-QL
Jul 6, 2017
922
113
Davidson, NC
Yesterday I went on a bus trip with the local classical radio station to a concert in the mountains.

About halfway, we stopped to pick up a fellow listener who is legally blind. His relative helped him to the bus, and one of the staff helped him on. We greeted him with applause. He thanked us and said that he was the relief bus driver.
 

Valvebounce

EOS 5D SR
Apr 3, 2013
4,046
74
52
Isle of Wight
:eek: :eek: ;D ;D ;D ;D

stevelee said:
Yesterday I went on a bus trip with the local classical radio station to a concert in the mountains.

About halfway, we stopped to pick up a fellow listener who is legally blind. His relative helped him to the bus, and one of the staff helped him on. We greeted him with applause. He thanked us and said that he was the relief bus driver.
 

Valvebounce

EOS 5D SR
Apr 3, 2013
4,046
74
52
Isle of Wight
Hi Foo.
I’m guessing you would have been in the “nah bollocks” group I encountered Thursday. ;D ;D
As I said above, I just got over it and moved on.

Cheers, Graham.

foo said:
Don Haines said:
When shooting with natural light, a polarizing filter helps a lot.
Good luck.. My prescription sunglasses are... polarised... and I wouldn't be taking them off either. You could be lucky and get an angle that doesn't make them totally black, but they're pretty dark anyway.

Folks like us who wear them permanently ain't going to take them off, although I'd certainly try to angle them so as not to cause a problem. Hey, if I'm in the photo maybe I want to be seen!

My normal specs are frameless which adds to the fun :)

Now being behind the lens with polarised specs and a polarising filter is a whole different problem..
 

Valvebounce

EOS 5D SR
Apr 3, 2013
4,046
74
52
Isle of Wight
Hi Folks.

As promised some shots of the wedding.

Please remember that I’m not a pro, I’m not charging for the photo’s and I really don’t like the pressure of being the sole photographer for a wedding despite the happy couple saying they are not worried about the results.

That said I would appreciate constructive criticism of my effort in order that I might not make the same mistakes again.
GCS00012_DxO by Graham Stretch, on Flickr
GCS00026_DxO by Graham Stretch, on Flickr

GCS00055_DxO by Graham Stretch, on Flickr

GCS00081_DxO by Graham Stretch, on Flickr

GCS00095_DxO by Graham Stretch, on Flickr

GCS00125_DxO by Graham Stretch, on Flickr

GCS00150_DxO by Graham Stretch, on Flickr

Cheers, Graham.
 
Reactions: stevelee

Jim Saunders

EOS 6D MK II
Sep 9, 2012
1,125
13
hhaphoto.com
Your framing is good and it looks like you have good timing for getting the meaningful moments. I'd lift the first two a stop or so if you can? I know indoor light is invariably challenging when you want anything besides wide open aperture and ISO to the moon.

Jim
 

Don Haines

Beware of cats with laser eyes!
Jun 4, 2012
7,759
1,002
Canada
I see what you mean by sunglasses.... they are distracting, but one has to work with what one is given and under the circumstances, you did well. I like the pictures.
 

hne

Gear limits your creativity
Jan 8, 2016
299
16
Next time, try not having a gigantic tree trunk right behind your subjects. Unless you use it as a prop.

If you roughly line up the sun, some nice background, plenty of space, your subject, camera, yourself and something dark, you can make great portraits pretty much anywhere. If you also get something bright on one side between you and your subject, you can get some absolutely fantastic to point light. If you don't have anything bright to the side, try sticking your model in the very edge of the shadow.

Some inspiration:
https://shultzphotoschool.teachable.com/courses/grads-legacy/lectures/3997093
 

Valvebounce

EOS 5D SR
Apr 3, 2013
4,046
74
52
Isle of Wight
Hi Jim.
Thanks, I saw how dark the first two were when I put them up, they didn’t look so bad on DxO! I was already thinking of going back to work on them and the others that I didn’t share. The only thing stopping me is the time difference between the two cameras, I only synced the jpegs (wasn’t sure I had the method right) but am now going to time sync the RAWS.
Thanks for the advice.
Confession time, most of the framing is cropped to improve and multiple shots help the timing thing!

Cheers, Graham.

Your framing is good and it looks like you have good timing for getting the meaningful moments. I'd lift the first two a stop or so if you can? I know indoor light is invariably challenging when you want anything besides wide open aperture and ISO to the moon.

Jim
 

Valvebounce

EOS 5D SR
Apr 3, 2013
4,046
74
52
Isle of Wight
Hi Don.
Thanks, as I got a nope from the father in law I decided that I wouldn’t bother for the shots I was in so I have my glasses on too!

Cheers, Graham.
 

Valvebounce

EOS 5D SR
Apr 3, 2013
4,046
74
52
Isle of Wight
Hi hne.
I only just got my way with using the shade, it was nearly against a plain brick wall in direct sun! I tried to get some separation, but everyone seemed to gravitate towards the tree for its nice shade, plus as I’m not confident shooting shallow DOF for a wedding just in case I missed focus I used the lenses stopped down a bit just in case which didn’t help, plus there is not a huge amount of space there, it is a public playing field and there were other groups around using the shade.
Thanks for the advice and link I will watch that later when I get home from work.
I have realised that as a photographer you need to really take charge as people who aren’t interested in photography will generally line up against a background unless strongly encouraged not to!

Cheers, Graham.

Next time, try not having a gigantic tree trunk right behind your subjects. Unless you use it as a prop.

If you roughly line up the sun, some nice background, plenty of space, your subject, camera, yourself and something dark, you can make great portraits pretty much anywhere. If you also get something bright on one side between you and your subject, you can get some absolutely fantastic to point light. If you don't have anything bright to the side, try sticking your model in the very edge of the shadow.

Some inspiration:
https://shultzphotoschool.teachable.com/courses/grads-legacy/lectures/3997093
 

stevelee

FT-QL
Jul 6, 2017
922
113
Davidson, NC
I like the natural look of the tree in the background and the relaxed look people had in the shade. It sure beats people squinting in front of a brick wall (or hiding behind sunglasses).
These are fun pictures. Much nicer than a lot of the usual stilted poses.