Here’s a list of rumoured and predicted cameras coming from Canon in the next year

canonical

EOS 80D
Jul 3, 2019
103
86
We cannot buy what they do not sell.
precisely. the only reason why transition to mirrorfree gear has not happened much faster and much earlier. more than enough demand. not nearly enough supply of right gear at sensible prices.

current situation is about 50-80% of what users want at 150-300% of fair price.

just watch how well stuff sells, when makers do offer things that many users want, like decent, small and inexpensive APS-C gear: Canon EOS M50 and EF-M lenses for example.

market niche of those willing and able to buy f/1.2 lenses or f/2 zooms, ART bricks or GrandMaster flash lenses at 2, 3 or more grand a pop is really small. minority interest.

or the weird obsession with 4k video in each camera. not needed by 80% of all potential buyers, challenged enough capturing a halfway decent stills image. they wont ever be movie directors or cinematographers. not by a mile. industry would ve well advised to offer separate video/cine vs stills gear with only a few "convergence" products in between. rather than struggling to put some crippled video capture into each and every device.
 
Last edited:

dtaylor

Canon 5Ds
Jul 26, 2011
1,487
972
precisely. the only reason why transition to mirrorfree gear has not happened much faster and much earlier. more than enough demand. not nearly enough supply of really right gear at sensible prices.
I get so tired of this meme.

Mirrorless ILCs are a decade old now. Until very recently they have suffered from AF, EVF, and battery life issues. To some extent they still do, although the differences are much smaller now and in some use cases tilt towards MILCs. That is not a conspiracy nor is it a failure of Canon/Nikon/whoever to 'read the market.' It has taken that long to work out the technology. Rome was not built in a day. I've kept my eye on Sony since the first FF MILCs, and every generation, including the current one, has had a fatal flaw. The tech still isn't as mature as DSLRs and is still being worked out and improved. It's much better now than it was. But the point is that this stuff takes time. Neither Canon nor Nikon wanted to stop you from buying a mirror free camera from them.

A minority of very vocal mirrorless fans, along with some of the press, have been clamoring for MILCs to 'takeover the market' and 'kill the mirror slappers' practically since 2008. The rest of the market has been quietly buying DSLRs and waiting for the tech to mature.

just watch how well stuff sells, when makers do offer things that many users want, like decent, small and inexpensive APS-C gear: Canon EOS M50 and EF-M lenses for example.
The M line fulfills a promise of mirrorless and a niche: really small, lightweight ILC system with relatively high IQ. I still have my original M, and it's still my "grab-n-go' camera with either the 22mm f/2 or surprisingly good 18-55 IS. But there's a whole list of features and use cases where it can't touch the 7D or 5Ds. Granted it was Canon's first attempt, but nothing else in production that same year could touch them either.

market niche of those willing and able to buy f/1.2 lenses or f/2 zooms, ART bricks or GrandMaster flash lenses at 2, 3 or more grand a pop is really small. minority interest.
And a profitable one.
 

Kit.

EOR R
Apr 25, 2011
1,700
1,048
I doubt the M mount will disappear. Eventually, Canon will replace its Point and Shoot and APS-C cameras with mirrorless versions.
Are Canon's P&S cameras not mirrorless yet?

Or are you suggesting that the customers will be fine with replacing their mountfree cameras with mountflappers, for all this added size, weight and cost?
 

tron

EOS 5D SR
Nov 8, 2011
4,440
701
Right now there are many very good DSLR bodies with the very good EF lenses at reasonable prices so why rush? 24=70 2.8L II, 85mm 1.4L IS are more than good enough and cost less than half of RF28-70 f/2 and RF85 1.2
 

sid.safari

EOS T7i
Sep 5, 2018
75
49
As a wildlife photographer give me the 1dx iii with significant improvements in DR, autofocus point coverage and a minor bump in fps and I'm happy. Except for the A9 there is no mirrorless system that can compete with the DSLR at the moment for wildlife. Eye autofocus for animals moving through foliage or doing something unexpected is simply not good enough. Wildlife is unforgiving when it comes to getting the shot. We can't recompose or ask models to repeat a move...we also can't control weather. Reliability is everything when you are in a jungle or in the Arctic. Canon has proven reliability and performance with the 1Dx for decades. I don't think a EVF and some gimmicky autofocus will be enough to turn wildlife photographers to the mirrorless revolutions...

But...new exciting lens might. If a 400mm RF with built in dual extenders comes in -- than maybe it will worth the switch. Till than give me something reliable and built like a tank. When I'm in the field I need something that won't let me down not something a youtuber thinks is the next cool thing.
 
Jul 15, 2019
3
3
Ouch. Don't care? Not something one would expect from a Canon fan site.
I agree.
Canon Rumors says it doesn't care about the M system because Canon doesn't seem to care. Well, on the other hand when you look at the messages on this forum it looks like the M system generates a lot of interest. A good proportion of CR readers do care about the M system. And the sales prove it as well.

If every single media only talks about what they think Canon cares about, well, then it's a closed loop and it will be hard for Canon to know what their customers want ;-)
 

YuengLinger

EOS 5D MK IV
Dec 20, 2012
2,827
1,055
Southeastern USA
The only advantages of the R over the 5DIV that I see, apart from the buffer, are 1) A couple of great new lenses, 2) Doing away with AFMA, and 3) More AF points for, supposedly, easier composition.

No, I haven't used the R, but I can see that it does not appeal to me ergonomically at all because of the layout of the controls.

Canon pulled a fast one here by getting photographers excited about "potential" and a few amazing lenses ready right now. But did anybody get excited about the R camera itself?

That's why I, and, presumably other photographers, see the R as a something of a promise of better to come, a placeholder to buy time, and a prototype which allows Canon to have consumers pay for a lot of R&D. (And it gives the repair techs good training with FF mirrorless.) This is solid, clever, and even admirable business acumen.

Will the next release of a FF mirrorless have some EVF breakthrough that reduces the lag that makes it difficult for action/sports? Will it have a sensor that allows for no (or much less) 4K cropping?

(Yes, 4k seems to practical photographers an unnecessary feature, but many customers already have 4k TVs, so they likely imagine how awful it would be to have a shiny new camera that doesn't match the native resolution of their displays at home...)

An interesting couple of years ahead for photographers and the industry!
 

tron

EOS 5D SR
Nov 8, 2011
4,440
701
The only advantages of the R over the 5DIV that I see, apart from the buffer, are 1) A couple of great new lenses, 2) Doing away with AFMA, and 3) More AF points for, supposedly, easier composition.

No, I haven't used the R, but I can see that it does not appeal to me ergonomically at all because of the layout of the controls.

Canon pulled a fast one here by getting photographers excited about "potential" and a few amazing lenses ready right now. But did anybody get excited about the R camera itself?

That's why I, and, presumably other photographers, see the R as a something of a promise of better to come, a placeholder to buy time, and a prototype which allows Canon to have consumers pay for a lot of R&D. (And it gives the repair techs good training with FF mirrorless.) This is solid, clever, and even admirable business acumen.

Will the next release of a FF mirrorless have some EVF breakthrough that reduces the lag that makes it difficult for action/sports? Will it have a sensor that allows for no (or much less) 4K cropping?

(Yes, 4k seems to practical photographers an unnecessary feature, but many customers already have 4k TVs, so they likely imagine how awful it would be to have a shiny new camera that doesn't match the native resolution of their displays at home...)

An interesting couple of years ahead for photographers and the industry!
I (fully) agree about the ergonomic issue and the EVF lag. Let's also include and other disadvantages like the one card and the battery consumption. Plus the need to use converter to put our good L lenses :) I wouldn't change my 5DIV for EOS R and I would get a 5DV but I am afraid I am a minority. We'll see....
 
  • Like
Reactions: YuengLinger

Architect1776

Defining the poetics of space through Architecture
Aug 18, 2017
524
473
118
Williamsport, PA
I just ask for a good solid performing mid range R camera with IBIS.
1 or 2 slots, I don't care.
35-40 MP sensor
7-8 FPS
Weather sealed to the level of the 7D series.
Just a good mid-range, does not need millions of bells and whistles.
Video with today's technology should be 8K and be FF, 4K is so last year and lame now.
A decent DR but if within 1/2 stop as it is now with others is good enough as I have a habit of properly exposing my photos and don't go around under exposing by 15 stops as some do.
The biggest thing though is a top notch IBIS that works with all attachments like telescopes, bellows and any other non-Canon EF or R lens mounted on it.
 

Otara

EOS RP
Jul 16, 2012
300
83
The R is mostly a scaled up M5 with some new ideas about interface - instead of an 80D sensor, its a 5DIV. Its not so much a placeholder as a pricepoint.

There's going to be better. It will be priced accordingly I suspect.
 

Danglin52

Wildlife Shooter
Aug 8, 2018
146
114
My background is technology and I typically review my technologies once a year to determine if they are doing the job or if it is time to upgrade. As many of you on this forum, I went through the transition from film to digital buying into each new generation of camera - 10d, 20d, 30d, 1ds all the way up through my current 1dx II & 5dIV. For the small price of a few $1,000 dollars every couple of years I got increasingly better gear that may/may not have allowed me to take better photographs. I see mirrorless as the same type of evolution moving from a hybrid electronic/mechanical DSLR to an all digital solution with the benefit of a CPU onboard for computational computing. The end result should be a robust all digital platform with very few moving parts (Battery & card door) and the ability to add new features and capabilities through software. I was hoping the R would at least match the capabilities of my 5dIV with reasonable ergonomics, but unfortunately I was disappointed. I don't see anything from Canon YET that would make me go through the expense of buying new mirrorless every couple of years until I have a camera that matches my current DSLR's. The only company that even comes close on the mirrorless promise at the higher end is Sony, maybe Fuji & Panasonic. Unfortunately, Sony support & user interface, and long lens selection are not that great. I broke my own rule on the on the M5 knowing it was not there yet and bought when it first hit the market. I really like the little guy, but it needs an overall performance improvement especially the AF. I will definitely buy version II if overall throughput and AF are significantly improved. The bottom line for me is that while mirrorless can probably meet 75-85% of the need for most photographers, I am not in a hurry to move to mirrorless until it offers benefits over my current gear. I may buy an R once it matches my 5dIV capabilities & ergonomics (joy stick, no slider) just for fun. Sony and Nikon have better mirrorless/sensors at this time, but I don't think it makes that much difference when you factor in Canon glass. BTW - my focus is nature and wildlife
 
  • Like
Reactions: pj1974

IWLP

EOS T7i
Feb 15, 2011
81
11
"I don’t care much about the EOS M system "
Surely the EOS M has a high potential to surpass the XXD line in the coming years.
But you have to finish the quote

... as I still believe it isn’t being taken seriously at Canon.
So yes, it has that potential, but only if Canon sees that potential and leverages it. Good bodies, not leftover sensors and more glass options.

But what I'd really like Canon to do is to come out with a 5D Mark V and an EOS RX/Y/∞ with close to the same feature set. Yes, put the mirrorless-specific goodies in the R, but let the market decide what is right for them. Basically, a mirrorless and an SLR version of the same camera, with features tailored to their physical platform.

After shooting a 6D II and an R side by side, there's ups and downs to both. However, if Canon dangled a 5D V and an EOS R(Next) in front of me with same sensor and cutting-edge tech specific to their platform, I'd likely buy one of each.
 

Rivermist

Mirrorless or bust.
Apr 27, 2019
35
61
Houston
I get so tired of this meme.

Mirrorless ILCs are a decade old now. Until very recently they have suffered from AF, EVF, and battery life issues. To some extent they still do, although the differences are much smaller now and in some use cases tilt towards MILCs. That is not a conspiracy nor is it a failure of Canon/Nikon/whoever to 'read the market.' It has taken that long to work out the technology. Rome was not built in a day. I've kept my eye on Sony since the first FF MILCs, and every generation, including the current one, has had a fatal flaw. The tech still isn't as mature as DSLRs and is still being worked out and improved. It's much better now than it was. But the point is that this stuff takes time. Neither Canon nor Nikon wanted to stop you from buying a mirror free camera from them.

A minority of very vocal mirrorless fans, along with some of the press, have been clamoring for MILCs to 'takeover the market' and 'kill the mirror slappers' practically since 2008. The rest of the market has been quietly buying DSLRs and waiting for the tech to mature.



The M line fulfills a promise of mirrorless and a niche: really small, lightweight ILC system with relatively high IQ. I still have my original M, and it's still my "grab-n-go' camera with either the 22mm f/2 or surprisingly good 18-55 IS. But there's a whole list of features and use cases where it can't touch the 7D or 5Ds. Granted it was Canon's first attempt, but nothing else in production that same year could touch them either.



And a profitable one.
Very good points all, and I agree about technical maturity being the real issue. I am perplexed by the attention given to one memory card only, for me the breakthrough will be IBIS, which opens up so many possibilities to use some of the new RF ultra bright non-IS lenses in low light situations (28-70 being one of them). My RP is proving a very valuable companion to the 5D MkIII even with its lower-grade EVF, but IBIS would be the trigger to replacing the 5D, or at least relegating it to 3rd body status.