Here are more Canon EOS R6 Specifications [CR2]

Kit.

EOR R
Apr 25, 2011
1,821
1,134
Don’t confuse HSS with HS/Hypersync, you are conflating the two and they are very different. Also HSS and regular IGBT strobes and flashes control the output by shortening the duration the flash tube is energized, or in the case of HSS how rapidly the tube pulses.
Don't adjustable-power LED sources do the same?

Averaged over 1/8000 s it looks like a constant intensity light source with adjustable power, otherwise HSS wouldn't work.
 

privatebydesign

Would you take advice from a cartoons stuffed toy?
Jan 29, 2011
8,577
2,119
120
Don't adjustable-power LED sources do the same?

Averaged over 1/8000 s it looks like a constant intensity light source with adjustable power, otherwise HSS wouldn't work.
I understood that in HSS the output by varied by reducing the flash frequency not the light output per pulse, but I can’t find a link to confirm that so I don’t know where I read it. HS/Hypersync/Hi-Sync only have one flash pulse over sync speed so the only way to vary the output is to lower the power to that one flash, you can’t shorten the duration as with a single pulse sub sync speed flash which is how IGBT circuits work.

i suppose in HSS they could shorten the duration of each pulse rather than change the number of pulses.
 

smr

I'm New Here
Jan 24, 2017
23
3
As the R6 is purportedly going to have the same sensor as the 1DXIII I've just been reading about the sensor... some interesting sounding stuff...

"Тhе еvеr-іmрrоvіng hіgh іmаgе quаlіtу іn thе ЕОЅ-1D Х rаngе іѕ оwеd tо thе ѕіnglе DІGІС Х Іmаgе Рrосеѕѕоr, Gаuѕѕіаn Lоw Раѕѕ Fіltеr, аnd thе НЕІF Іmаgе Fоrmаt аlоng wіth оthеr fеаturеѕ. Тhе ехtrеmеlу fаѕt аnd еffісіеnt DІGІС Х Іmаgе Рrосеѕѕоr іѕ іn сhаrgе оf thе саmеrа’ѕ оutѕtаndіng іmаgе quаlіtу аnd rеѕроnѕіvе реrfоrmаnсе.

Тhе lаttеr іѕ сhаrасtеrіѕеd bу 20fрѕ соntіnuоuѕ сарturе 4К/60р оvеrѕаmрlеd vіdео. Тhе рrосеѕѕоr еnѕurеѕ іnсrеdіblу lоw lеvеlѕ оf nоіѕе whеn wоrkіng аt а hіgh ІЅО, іn аddіtіоn tо еnаblіng grеаtеr DLО, АLО, аnd Ніghlіght Тоnе Рrіоrіtу.

Тhе Gаuѕѕіаn Lоw Раѕѕ Fіltеr wоrkѕ bу ѕаmрlіng lіght оvеr а lаrgеr numbеr оf ріхеlѕ whеn соmраrеd tо а соnvеntіоnаl lоw раѕѕ fіltеr. Тhіѕ mеаnѕ thаt fіnе ѕhаrрnеѕѕ аnd сlаrіtу оf thе іmаgе аrе рrеѕеrvеd whіlе орtісаl іѕѕuеѕ ѕuсh аѕ mоіrе аrе mіnіmіѕеd. Fіnаllу, thе НЕІF Іmаgе Fоrmаt; аlѕо knоwn аѕ thе Ніgh Еffісіеnсу Іmаgе Fіlе; іѕ thе nехt-gеn оf fіlе fоrmаtѕ - grеаt nеwѕ fоr dіgіtаl рhоtоgrарhеrѕ.

Іt аllоwѕ fоr а hіghеr іmаgе quаlіtу wіthоut thе іnсrеаѕе іn fіlе ѕіzе, аѕ орроѕеd tо ЈРЕGѕ. НЕІF fіlеѕ оffеr а ѕmаllеr аmоunt оf аrtеfасtѕ аnd аn аmрlіfіеd dуnаmіс rаngе fеаturіng 10-bіt соlоur dерth."
 

Kit.

EOR R
Apr 25, 2011
1,821
1,134
I understood that in HSS the output by varied by reducing the flash frequency not the light output per pulse, but I can’t find a link to confirm that so I don’t know where I read it. HS/Hypersync/Hi-Sync only have one flash pulse over sync speed so the only way to vary the output is to lower the power to that one flash, you can’t shorten the duration as with a single pulse sub sync speed flash which is how IGBT circuits work.

i suppose in HSS they could shorten the duration of each pulse rather than change the number of pulses.
That's how Canon describes it:
HSS changes the way your Speedlite fires

In normal flash mode, your Speedlite fires as a single pulse of light. In HSS, the Speedlite turns into an ultra-fast strobe light that turns on and off up to 35,000 times per second. The staccato of light is so fast that the Speedlite effectively becomes a continuous light source for the brief duration of the exposure – this enables virtually any shutter speed to be utilised with flash.
35kHz doesn't look like a safe enough high limit if they only control the duty cycle by changing the frequency of pulses.
 

Etienne

EOS 6D MK II
Sep 19, 2010
1,424
231
Ottawa Ontario
None of these cameras (R5, R6, 1D X Mark III, etc.) are "weather sealed". Canon is very careful to refer to certain parts of their construction as "weather sealing", but they never use the term "sealed".

Look at the official Canon description for the 1D X Mark III's weather and dust resistance:

"Designed for use in a variety of weather conditions, the EOS-1D X Mark III camera has sealing materials that are used in critical areas like the buttons, terminal covers, the battery compartment and the card slot cover. Precise design and construction help to minimize accidental insertion of dust and moisture in the rest of the camera body. The EOS-1D X Mark III camera proves to be a reliable partner in virtually any climate."

Notice that they say these materials and construction "... help to minimize accidental insertion of dust and moisture..." in "... virtually any climate. What they don't say is, "These materials and construction eliminate insertion of dust and moisture in any climate.

They NEVER use the word "proof" in conjunction with the words "dust" and "weather". I also do not recall them ever claiming any ILC or lens is "sealed", only that the are made with "weather sealing" materials at specific openings and may be "more dust and weather resistant" than other products.

As Uncle Roger often says:

"Weather resistantA term that consumers falsely define as ‘weatherproof’ and camera companies accurately define as ‘the warranty doesn’t cover water damage’. "
Good point, but many years ago I used my 5D3 with 70-200 f/2.8L IS in a strong rain in Florence, Italy, for almost an hour. When I got back to the apartment I wiped it off, and let it sit overnight to dry out before opening anything, and the camera and lens were perfectly fine. I've used that that same camera with an L lens attached in may other wet conditions for almost four years without problem as well.

I agree with you, but their "weather-resistance" is actually pretty good.
 
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Jack Douglas

CR for the Humour
Apr 10, 2013
6,531
1,811
Alberta, Canada
Don’t confuse HSS with HS/Hypersync/Hi-Sync you are conflating the two types and they are very different. Also HSS and regular IGBT strobes and flashes control the output by shortening the duration the flash tube is energized, or in the case of HSS how rapidly the tube pulses. I believe HS/Hypersync/Hi-Sync do all work by varying the energy provided to the tube.

this link gives the best graphics I have seen to explain the difference between HSS and HS/Hypersync

[/URL]
Thanks for the link. I shall be getting educated.

Jack
 

briangus

EOS T7i
Apr 6, 2017
73
100
Bangkok
None of these cameras (R5, R6, 1D X Mark III, etc.) are "weather sealed". Canon is very careful to refer to certain parts of their construction as "weather sealing", but they never use the term "sealed".

Look at the official Canon description for the 1D X Mark III's weather and dust resistance:

"Designed for use in a variety of weather conditions, the EOS-1D X Mark III camera has sealing materials that are used in critical areas like the buttons, terminal covers, the battery compartment and the card slot cover. Precise design and construction help to minimize accidental insertion of dust and moisture in the rest of the camera body. The EOS-1D X Mark III camera proves to be a reliable partner in virtually any climate."

Notice that they say these materials and construction "... help to minimize accidental insertion of dust and moisture..." in "... virtually any climate. What they don't say is, "These materials and construction eliminate insertion of dust and moisture in any climate.

They NEVER use the word "proof" in conjunction with the words "dust" and "weather". I also do not recall them ever claiming any ILC or lens is "sealed", only that the are made with "weather sealing" materials at specific openings and may be "more dust and weather resistant" than other products.

As Uncle Roger often says:

"Weather resistantA term that consumers falsely define as ‘weatherproof’ and camera companies accurately define as ‘the warranty doesn’t cover water damage’. "
When I first encountered this site I was quite bemused by this weather sealing and what it actually meant.
I actually thought that Canon had released a Nikonos equivalent due to some of the claims.

People are still making comparisons of how "weather sealed" one camera is to another when there seems to be no set of standards to compare.

Unfortunately the internet doesn't help as some sites seem to infer that these newer cameras can withstand any type of inclement weather.
One site rates the EOS R as "Weather sealed like crazy"
When it rains down this way I am somewhere safe and dry and so are my cameras
 

Michael Clark

Now we see through a glass, darkly...
Apr 5, 2016
2,511
1,438
Good point, but many years ago I used my 5D3 with 70-200 f/2.8L IS in a strong rain in Florence, Italy, for almost an hour. When I got back to the apartment I wiped it off, and let it sit overnight to dry out before opening anything, and the camera and lens were perfectly fine. I've used that that same camera with an L lens attached in may other wet conditions for almost four years without problem as well.

I agree with you, but their "weather-resistance" is actually pretty good.

When I first encountered this site I was quite bemused by this weather sealing and what it actually meant.
I actually thought that Canon had released a Nikonos equivalent due to some of the claims.

People are still making comparisons of how "weather sealed" one camera is to another when there seems to be no set of standards to compare.

Unfortunately the internet doesn't help as some sites seem to infer that these newer cameras can withstand any type of inclement weather.
One site rates the EOS R as "Weather sealed like crazy"
When it rains down this way I am somewhere safe and dry and so are my cameras
I've shot in plenty of rainy environments without any damage to my gear as well. Canon's weather resistance is very good in their upper tier models. But if it is pouring down rain I put the plastic covers on. Yes, they are a pain but they're insurance. My standard is that if I need a rain jacket and hat, then so does my gear. I shudder when I read people use the terms "weather proof" or even "weather sealed" when talking about cameras and lenses. I think it may give those who do not understand the subtleties a false confidence about how much water or dust or sand their gear can resist.

Again, drawing from Roger Cicala's blog at lensrentals:

Here’s a list of bad things that we’ll discuss.

  1. Camera manufacturers market their equipment as weather resistant. But if you get water inside the camera the warranty is void. So that’s pretty much “we guarantee it will work unless it breaks.”
  2. People think weather resistant means waterproof because they want to believe that.
  3. Service Centers play the impact/moisture damage card so much that everyone assumes they are full of …shirt… when they say so.
  4. There are two kinds of photographers: Those who have ruined a camera from water damage and are careful about water and see #2.
  5. Most service centers won’t work on a water damaged camera, even if you pay them. Some won’t even open it up to look inside if they see evidence on the outside.
 

reefroamer

EOS T7i
Jun 21, 2014
65
75
None of these cameras (R5, R6, 1D X Mark III, etc.) are "weather sealed". Canon is very careful to refer to certain parts of their construction as "weather sealing", but they never use the term "sealed".

Look at the official Canon description for the 1D X Mark III's weather and dust resistance:

"Designed for use in a variety of weather conditions, the EOS-1D X Mark III camera has sealing materials that are used in critical areas like the buttons, terminal covers, the battery compartment and the card slot cover. Precise design and construction help to minimize accidental insertion of dust and moisture in the rest of the camera body. The EOS-1D X Mark III camera proves to be a reliable partner in virtually any climate."

Notice that they say these materials and construction "... help to minimize accidental insertion of dust and moisture..." in "... virtually any climate. What they don't say is, "These materials and construction eliminate insertion of dust and moisture in any climate.

They NEVER use the word "proof" in conjunction with the words "dust" and "weather". I also do not recall them ever claiming any ILC or lens is "sealed", only that the are made with "weather sealing" materials at specific openings and may be "more dust and weather resistant" than other products.

As Uncle Roger often says:

"Weather resistantA term that consumers falsely define as ‘weatherproof’ and camera companies accurately define as ‘the warranty doesn’t cover water damage’. "
Exactly. It’s the same reason that wristwatches are all called water “resistant” these days rather than water “proof.” This is because the legal department won’t let the company make absolute claims. The lawyers review every word of marketing materials, advertising and press releases. Trust me on this. I once had to describe a desktop printer as “designed to fit on a desktop.” Notice it doesn’t say it will actually fit on a desktop, only that it was designed to do so. We used to call these “weasel words.”
 
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Aussie shooter

www.facebook.com/BrettGuyPhotography/
Dec 6, 2016
754
895
When I first encountered this site I was quite bemused by this weather sealing and what it actually meant.
I actually thought that Canon had released a Nikonos equivalent due to some of the claims.

People are still making comparisons of how "weather sealed" one camera is to another when there seems to be no set of standards to compare.

Unfortunately the internet doesn't help as some sites seem to infer that these newer cameras can withstand any type of inclement weather.
One site rates the EOS R as "Weather sealed like crazy"
When it rains down this way I am somewhere safe and dry and so are my cameras
It is more a case of anecdotal evidence suggesting that canons weather sealing tends to perform better than the rest. Certainly way way better than Sony has historically performed but I imagine Nikon is damn close to Canon. None of them are perfect but some are clearly better than others
 

Viggo

EOS 5D SR
Dec 13, 2010
4,468
1,137
At 1/8000 and iso 50 how much flash power do you think you are getting? You are minimum of five stops down from full power but most HSS flashes are going to lose another couple of stops on top of that. A reflector would be much more effective and powerful and a darn sight cheaper.
It was no issue with the Broncolor Siros 800 L. It uses HS, which much more flashes should use, and it was 800Ws, so even at 1.2 and 1/8000s I had a two-three stops away from full power. Meaning it sometimes worked at 200Ws. With my old HSS enabled flashes it was max power and very close to subject, but it worked
 

Michael Clark

Now we see through a glass, darkly...
Apr 5, 2016
2,511
1,438
The elephant in the room regarding HSS is that no matter what the shutter duration is, the curtain transit times are the same for a given camera. For the top tier DSLRs that's around 2.5 milliseconds, or 1/400 second. Entry level digital cameras used to be in the 4-5 ms (1/250-1/200) range but lately seem to be closer to around 3-4 ms. Everything else is in between. I know not how much faster, if any, the transit times will need to be for the 20 fps (mechanical shutter) cameras currently emerging in the market.

Keep in mind that for normal flash sync, both curtains must remain open long enough for flash signalling and flash duration to occur. So even if a camera has a transit time of 2.5ms (1/400), the second curtain can not begin to close immediately after the first curtain is fully open. It must wait until the "fire" signal has been sent and the flash has had time to release its energy, or at least 90% of it for a t.1 exposure. For speedlights, that's typically at least as long as the shutter curtain transit time. Speedlights are so named because they can reach T.1 so quickly. Many monolights tend to take much longer for a full power pulse to reach T.1 (mostly because they are releasing much more power than a typical speedlight), and that's why we often need to reduce Tv to well below the X-Sync for the camera to get the full benefit of a studio flash.

At 20 fps with a 2.5 ms shutter transit time in mirrorless/LV shooting there's still 47.5 ms less the exposure time (another 0.125ms for 1/8000, another 0.25ms for 1/4000, 0.5ms for 1/2000, 1 ms for 1/1000, and so on) available in each frame's 1/20 second (50ms) to reset the second shutter curtain which uncovers the sensor, do AF/metering, and then reset the first curtain to cover the sensor. With an OVF it probably gets a bit more difficult to drop the mirror, give it time to stop bouncing, do AF/metering, raise the mirror, give it time to stop bouncing, and confirm it is up in only 46-47.5 ms. If one looks at super slow-mo videos of DSLRs at 1/8000, it's pretty clear the shutter curtains wait until the mirror is almost all the way back down to begin resetting and they complete the reset before the mirror hits bottom and stops bouncing.

HSS is supposed to time the pulses of the flash so that as the slit between curtains moves across the sensor, each part of the sensor gets an equal number of pulses. Thus the timing of the pulses needs to be variable to accommodate different shutter speeds/slit widths or needs to be so fast that it is pulsing at least at the lowest common multiple of all of the available exposure times/slit widths in ms, which I imagine would be astronomically high if one assumes 1/3 stop Tv intervals are allowed.
 
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Michael Clark

Now we see through a glass, darkly...
Apr 5, 2016
2,511
1,438
When I first encountered this site I was quite bemused by this weather sealing and what it actually meant.
I actually thought that Canon had released a Nikonos equivalent due to some of the claims.

People are still making comparisons of how "weather sealed" one camera is to another when there seems to be no set of standards to compare.

Unfortunately the internet doesn't help as some sites seem to infer that these newer cameras can withstand any type of inclement weather.
One site rates the EOS R as "Weather sealed like crazy"
When it rains down this way I am somewhere safe and dry and so are my cameras
When a review site's standard is the weather resistance of the early Sony α7-series, any Canon camera is "weather sealed like crazy!"
 
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unfocused

EOS 1D MK II
Jul 20, 2010
5,512
2,376
66
Springfield, IL
www.mgordoncommunications.com
Exactly. It’s the same reason that wristwatches are all called water “resistant” these days rather than water “proof.” This is because the legal department won’t let the company make absolute claims. The lawyers review every word of marketing materials, advertising and press releases. Trust me on this. I once had to describe a desktop printer as “designed to fit on a desktop.” Notice it doesn’t say it will actually fit on a desktop, only that it was designed to do so. We used to call these “weasel words.”
There are good reasons for that. The entire trial lawyer industry is made up of people who earn their living suing companies, often for mishaps that result from idiots doing stupid things. There once was a time, when if someone made a mistake and something unfortunate happened, you lived with the consequences. These days, no one is expected to live with the consequences of their own stupidity. That's why we have baby strollers with warnings like "do not fold stroller with child inside."

I remember a few years ago on this very site, some dummy took his brand new 6D out in a boat in a middle of rainstorm and was shocked when it quit working because it was "weather sealed."
 

usern4cr

EOS RP
Sep 2, 2018
269
200
Kentucky, USA
It's interesting to hear of "weather sealed/sealing" claims by various manufacturers. The reality is that some are incredible, most are adequate if you don't keep them in continuous rain, and some are downright lying.

I have an Olympus EM1mark2 and pro lenses. If you bet me some big money if I dunked it with lens into a toilet or swimming pool and it'd still work fine, I'd take your bet and it'd be fine. They're one of the few(maybe only) than went truly overboard in weather sealing. Too bad the sensor is so small and so old (even in the mark3). *Edit* Well, going out of business doesn't bode too well for them either. :oops:

Sony is the opposite. From what I've read, they often don't even have a rubber seal around the lens mount that actually touches the camera mount when connected. Their bodies have sometimes been found to let in large amounts of water at various places. :oops:

Canon seems to have a very good reputation for sealing, and I'm very much looking forward to checking it out myself with a new R5 and some RF lenses. :D

No matter what the sealing quality, I don't use the camera in the rain, period! But if I get caught in the rain before I can put it away, it's good to know it'd be safe.
 
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briangus

EOS T7i
Apr 6, 2017
73
100
Bangkok
A couple of years ago i was in Phuket for Songkran/Thai New Year
It’s celebrated by the pouring of water on folks to wash away their sins but has degenerated into a mass water pistol fight.

Normally would have taken the 6D and some primes but decided the EM5 and 12-40 would be better choice.
Smaller so would be less of a target, wouldn’t miss it if it died and it allegedly was quite well sealed.

The EM5 never took a direct hit, most of the water pistol guys seemed to be targeting women and children.
After a couple of hours the EM5 started to play up then it just stopped.
Following day was still not working so it went straight into the dry cabinet when i got home.

Left it for a day and it fired up but still unusable, so back in cabinet to dry out for longer.
I actually forgot all about it until a couple of months later, popped the battery in and away it went.

Thankfully this years celebrations were cancelled
 
Jul 9, 2012
8
0
As the R6 is purportedly going to have the same sensor as the 1DXIII I've just been reading about the sensor... some interesting sounding stuff...

"Тhе еvеr-іmрrоvіng hіgh іmаgе quаlіtу іn thе ЕОЅ-1D Х rаngе іѕ оwеd tо thе ѕіnglе DІGІС Х Іmаgе Рrосеѕѕоr, Gаuѕѕіаn Lоw Раѕѕ Fіltеr, аnd thе НЕІF Іmаgе Fоrmаt аlоng wіth оthеr fеаturеѕ. Тhе ехtrеmеlу fаѕt аnd еffісіеnt DІGІС Х Іmаgе Рrосеѕѕоr іѕ іn сhаrgе оf thе саmеrа’ѕ оutѕtаndіng іmаgе quаlіtу аnd rеѕроnѕіvе реrfоrmаnсе.

Тhе lаttеr іѕ сhаrасtеrіѕеd bу 20fрѕ соntіnuоuѕ сарturе 4К/60р оvеrѕаmрlеd vіdео. Тhе рrосеѕѕоr еnѕurеѕ іnсrеdіblу lоw lеvеlѕ оf nоіѕе whеn wоrkіng аt а hіgh ІЅО, іn аddіtіоn tо еnаblіng grеаtеr DLО, АLО, аnd Ніghlіght Тоnе Рrіоrіtу.

Тhе Gаuѕѕіаn Lоw Раѕѕ Fіltеr wоrkѕ bу ѕаmрlіng lіght оvеr а lаrgеr numbеr оf ріхеlѕ whеn соmраrеd tо а соnvеntіоnаl lоw раѕѕ fіltеr. Тhіѕ mеаnѕ thаt fіnе ѕhаrрnеѕѕ аnd сlаrіtу оf thе іmаgе аrе рrеѕеrvеd whіlе орtісаl іѕѕuеѕ ѕuсh аѕ mоіrе аrе mіnіmіѕеd. Fіnаllу, thе НЕІF Іmаgе Fоrmаt; аlѕо knоwn аѕ thе Ніgh Еffісіеnсу Іmаgе Fіlе; іѕ thе nехt-gеn оf fіlе fоrmаtѕ - grеаt nеwѕ fоr dіgіtаl рhоtоgrарhеrѕ.

Іt аllоwѕ fоr а hіghеr іmаgе quаlіtу wіthоut thе іnсrеаѕе іn fіlе ѕіzе, аѕ орроѕеd tо ЈРЕGѕ. НЕІF fіlеѕ оffеr а ѕmаllеr аmоunt оf аrtеfасtѕ аnd аn аmрlіfіеd dуnаmіс rаngе fеаturіng 10-bіt соlоur dерth."
I'm confused, why use the 1DXIII sensor not the RP sensor ?
arguably one was designed for an SLR and the other for Mirrorless.....
 

koenkooi

EOS 6D MK II
Feb 25, 2015
1,011
790
I'm confused, why use the 1DXIII sensor not the RP sensor ?
arguably one was designed for an SLR and the other for Mirrorless.....
LOL, the RP sensor is the 6D2 sensor with new microlenses. It also is one of the old, slow sensors. As we can see from the 32MP M6II, it's not the Digic 8 holding back performance on the R and RP, it's the sensor.

FWIW, on this forum 'sensor' tends to be used for the bare sensor, Canon uses 'sensor' to describe the bare sensor + microlens array. That's why Canon can call a sensor "new!!!" with a straight face when reusing an old one.