Industry News: Leica announces the M10 Monochrom

Canon Rumors Guy

EOS 1D MK II
Jul 20, 2010
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www.canonrumors.com
The highly anticipated camera enters a new dimension of innovation in the world of monochrome photography
January 17, 2020 – Leica Camera continues to be a trailblazer in the world of black-and-white photography with the announcement of the new Leica M10 Monochrom. Photographers are now able to explore their subjects in vivid tones of monochrome due to the omission of a color filter, resulting in an unparalleled black-and-white photography experience. The newly developed 40-megapixel true black-and-white sensor, new Wi-Fi capabilities, and expanded ISO range make room for added creativity with light and contrast, bringing photographers back to the basics with the most up-to-date technology.

Black-and-white photography lends itself to establishing emotional connections between the photographer and the subject matter being conveyed. With the absence of color, a photograph conveys intense, vulnerable and timeless messages that speak to...
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cayenne

EOR R
Mar 28, 2012
2,203
280
While I"m sure out of my price range (especially since I just got a mac pro for this years expenditures).....I'm curious about this.

I've been exploring B&W photography with film lately, Hasselblad 501 CM and Yashicha Mat 124G.....and have an interest in it.

This blurb mentioned one of the driving points of this monochrome camera was the "omission of a color filter'....can someone explain this to me and what it means different shooting on this camera vs a normal full spectrum modern camera sensor?

I thought it was just a sensor picking up photons and translating them. Is there some sort of optical color filter in front of the sensor or coating or something?

I"m just wanting to get a sense in the digital world, what would be the difference of shooting regular color on modern sensors vs this sensor?

Thanks in advance!!

cayenne
 

gcl

Feb 5, 2018
6
10
United States
While I"m sure out of my price range (especially since I just got a mac pro for this years expenditures).....I'm curious about this.

I've been exploring B&W photography with film lately, Hasselblad 501 CM and Yashicha Mat 124G.....and have an interest in it.

This blurb mentioned one of the driving points of this monochrome camera was the "omission of a color filter'....can someone explain this to me and what it means different shooting on this camera vs a normal full spectrum modern camera sensor?

I thought it was just a sensor picking up photons and translating them. Is there some sort of optical color filter in front of the sensor or coating or something?

I"m just wanting to get a sense in the digital world, what would be the difference of shooting regular color on modern sensors vs this sensor?

Thanks in advance!!

cayenne
Here's a short description of the difference between a monochrome sensor and the color filter arrays (Bayer, Xtrans) used on most full color digital cameras:

https://www.red.com/red-101/color-monochrome-camera-sensors

And something else you might find interesting for dedicated B&W work:

 
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slclick

Cyclist, photog, drummer & sardonic haiku writer
Dec 17, 2013
4,016
1,885
I love the jpegs you get with the X-Trans sensor but they have to be very low iso. So, with Canon use RAW on one card/Jpeg on the other, shoot with the M Picture Style for preview sake, play with the sliders and think B&W, think contrast....compare, contrast and finalize your RAW in post.

See? Another reason for 2 cards!
 

cayenne

EOR R
Mar 28, 2012
2,203
280
Here's a short description of the difference between a monochrome sensor and the color filter arrays (Bayer, Xtrans) used on most full color digital cameras:

https://www.red.com/red-101/color-monochrome-camera-sensors

And something else you might find interesting for dedicated B&W work:


Thank you that'll give me some good light lunch reading.
:)

Whist I'm pondering the information on these links.....how does one go about getting good, sharp focus on these types of rangefinder cameras, where you aren't looking through the lens to see what focus is like throughout the picture?

Good guesses?

I've never shot a rangefinder before and am curious....

Again, thanks in advance,

C
 

slclick

Cyclist, photog, drummer & sardonic haiku writer
Dec 17, 2013
4,016
1,885
Thank you that'll give me some good light lunch reading.
:)

Whist I'm pondering the information on these links.....how does one go about getting good, sharp focus on these types of rangefinder cameras, where you aren't looking through the lens to see what focus is like throughout the picture?

Good guesses?

I've never shot a rangefinder before and am curious....

Again, thanks in advance,

C
Don't the modern bodies (evf especially) compensate for parallax and give you an outline of your framing?
 

gcl

Feb 5, 2018
6
10
United States
Thank you that'll give me some good light lunch reading.
:)

Whist I'm pondering the information on these links.....how does one go about getting good, sharp focus on these types of rangefinder cameras, where you aren't looking through the lens to see what focus is like throughout the picture?

Good guesses?

I've never shot a rangefinder before and am curious....

Again, thanks in advance,

C
Rangefinder focusing cameras like the Leica M cameras have a bright patch in the center of the view finder - there is a double image when out of focus and as you turn the focusing ring on the lens barrel in the correct direction the two images will come together. When they have been joined completely together to form a single image - you are in focus (assuming the rangefinder is properly aligned, of course!).
 

cayenne

EOR R
Mar 28, 2012
2,203
280
Rangefinder focusing cameras like the Leica M cameras have a bright patch in the center of the view finder - there is a double image when out of focus and as you turn the focusing ring on the lens barrel in the correct direction the two images will come together. When they have been joined completely together to form a single image - you are in focus (assuming the rangefinder is properly aligned, of course!).
Oh...that's interesting!! I wonder how that works with it not going through the lens?
C
 

Del Paso

M3 Singlestroke
Aug 9, 2018
794
821
Does it have AFMA?
The rangefinder cam can be adjusted, with the adequate Allen key.
If a bit skilled, by owner (quite easy, but a little time-consuming), if not, by service. Since no AF, no AFMA, of course.
PS: The M lenses from 35 mm focal length can be used with great results on the R or RP cameras...but not the wider angle lenses (magenta cast on sides of picture).
 
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