Interesting what's happened since I got an RP.....

JPAZ

If only I knew what I was doing.....
Sep 8, 2012
923
35
When I 1st got this camera, I thought it would be a "back up" body or my quick "grab and go" camera. I do still love my 5Div, but wonder what will happen.

I find myself passing the DSLR and reaching for the RP instead more and more. Having taken the new camera on a trip to NYC and having used the new camera when taking shots of my grandkids, I've grown to really like using this. With back button focus, the ability to quickly move focus points using my thumb on the touchscreen, and a pretty reasonable sensor, what's not to like? When I've had images with poor focus, it's been my fault. When I've had images where I have been lured into using too slow of a shutter speed (the IS in the RF 24-105 is awfully good) causing motion blur, it's been my fault. The histogram in my viewfinder is reassuring.

Yeah, I know the FPS is less than ideal for some applications and I know that I feel much more secure with dual card slots. But I've grown to like this camera a lot more than I ever thought I would. I'm not ready to sell the 5Div but can really see me moving to a 100% mirrorless kit in the future.

I am leaving on a trekking trip next month. Ordinarily, I'd bring a lens triad and my 5Div to give me the most options and best battery life. But you know, when I lift up each camera and compare the weight, I might just bring the RP with 4 or 5 batteries. Anybody out there having similar thoughts?
 
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old-pr-pix

EOS RP
Dec 26, 2011
381
27
I went to the dark side several years ago when I bought into the m43 system. The smaller sensor is more than good enough for almost everything I shoot and the lighter lenses are a real bonus. The m43 stuff gets most of my work now days. Yet, I kept my Canon gear - partly because I like the native 3:2 aspect ratio a lot better for wide angle stuff. While the RP isn't the same weight savings as m43 gear, the new bodies and certain lenses (i.e. 70-200) look to be enough smaller than the EF versions to get my attention. It's about time for me to update my older generation Canon lenses anyway.
 

neuroanatomist

I post too Much on Here!!
Jul 21, 2010
24,607
2,060
Anybody out there having similar thoughts?
Not me...the 1D X remains my go-to camera for most uses. The R will definitely be for travel. For an upcoming hike to a mountain top (well, a mountain for New England – in my native California we’d call it a foothill), I’ll probably take the M6.
 
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May 3, 2019
4
1
San Diego, CA
I don't exactly have the same experience as you (I upgraded to the RP from an 80D) but I mirror your thoughts on the RP. I upgraded because I need something that performs better in low light and not that interested in shooting video. Despite all the negative press, I went ahead and purchased it knowing that I'd be using it mostly for landscapes and portraits. I took it out on my first shoot yesterday and really enjoyed using it, the 24-105mm is great and my 85mm 1.8 EF lens performed beautifully on it. I don't get to do much traveling these days with 4 little ones (and probably won't be doing much beyond occasional road trips because airfare will be astronomical) but there's plenty here in San Diego to photograph and I look forward to using it more. Anyway, I felt compelled to respond because the negative opinions far outweigh the positive and I'm hoping more posts/blogs/vlogs, etc reflect the positive aspects of the RP.
 
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koenkooi

EOS 7D MK II
Feb 25, 2015
459
271
I planned to get an R around the time there was a promotion to rent an R/RP + RF lenses for a week, for free. So I rented the RP + RF50 + RF24-105 + polarizing adapter. I liked it a lot, but hated how it rubbed the skin away near my ring finger. So 2 days into the rental period I bought the EG-E1 and that suddenly made it comfortable to hold and my wife still classified it as 'nice an small'.
In the end I didn't get the R, but bought an RP + 100mm L. A few months later I still don't have any regrets about that decision.
 

JPAZ

If only I knew what I was doing.....
Sep 8, 2012
923
35
I bought the EG-E1 and that suddenly made it comfortable to hold and my wife still classified it as 'nice an small'.
The EG-E1 went on mine day 1 and has remained ever since. Just more comfortable. The only downside to the "grip" is needing to attach a ballhead to the thumbscrew but I might go all in and put a plate on the bottom to use my QR clamps. Just noticed the RRS base plate (with or without the L bracket) might be a replacement for the EG-E1 if it give enough added height for my little finger. Anyone try one of these?
 

Mt Spokane Photography

I post too Much on Here!!
Mar 25, 2011
15,476
712
When I 1st got this camera, I thought it would be a "back up" body or my quick "grab and go" camera. I do still love my 5Div, but wonder what will happen.

I find myself passing the DSLR and reaching for the RP instead more and more. Having taken the new camera on a trip to NYC and having used the new camera when taking shots of my grandkids, I've grown to really like using this. With back button focus, the ability to quickly move focus points using my thumb on the touchscreen, and a pretty reasonable sensor, what's not to like? When I've had images with poor focus, it's been my fault. When I've had images where I have been lured into using too slow of a shutter speed (the IS in the RF 24-105 is awfully good) causing motion blur, it's been my fault. The histogram in my viewfinder is reassuring.

Yeah, I know the FPS is less than ideal for some applications and I know that I feel much more secure with dual card slots. But I've grown to like this camera a lot more than I ever thought I would. I'm not ready to sell the 5Div but can really see me moving to a 100% mirrorless kit in the future.

I am leaving on a trekking trip next month. Ordinarily, I'd bring a lens triad and my 5Div to give me the most options and best battery life. But you know, when I lift up each camera and compare the weight, I might just bring the RP with 4 or 5 batteries. Anybody out there having similar thoughts?
Yes, I find myself reaching for my R rather than my 5D MK IV just because its handier. Its not as good of a camera, but my 5D IV now seems large and clunky. I'm considering selling it because Its easier to take the R with me, even with its faults.
 
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Mar 14, 2012
2,294
180
Yes, I find myself reaching for my R rather than my 5D MK IV just because its handier. Its not as good of a camera, but my 5D IV now seems large and clunky. I'm considering selling it because Its easier to take the R with me, even with its faults.
I like the R for a lot of things, but for sports I still prefer the 5D IV by a large margin. I tried using the R with the 100-400 II for kids' soccer and at first I tried eyeAF in servo (with the new firmware). I was trying it at my younger daughters' game, and at that age, a lot of players clump together, and I found eyeAF to be useless. It wasn't so much that it would get out of eyeAF and draw a box on the body if the head turned or became obstructed, but it was that there were too many kids in frame and it would focus on one that I didn't want constantly and if I select one, it'd jump off if it detected another face. A lot of people rave about the A9 AF system but I don't know how it handles this type of situation where there are multiple people at different distances. How does it know which person to focus on? Or do people just put on subject in the center and hope that it is the closest (largest in frame)? It was interesting seeing how Jared Polin uses a MILC to focus during a Flyers game. He used the central zone but in his shots there was usually only one main subject in that focusing zone.

As a result, I changed it work with how I'd use the 5D4. Select a AF point (usually 1/3 on either the left or right side depending which way the player is going) and put that point on subject and pan/track accordingly. That worked better, but I still didn't like it. The frame rate and the temporary freezing/blackout in the EVF was jarring compared the optical VF in the 5D4, so it was harder to track with the R. After about 15-20 minutes, I switched to the 5D4 and was much more productive.
 

Normalnorm

EOS 7D MK II
Dec 25, 2012
522
130
How does it know which person to focus on? Or do people just put on subject in the center and hope that it is the closest (largest in frame)?
No camera really does. I have been frustrated with AF since the first EOS 630. Like any auto process, it can, and frequently does, make an automatic error. The mirrorless camera EVFs demonstrate their error facility when used in exposure simulation mode and any auto exposure mode. As you move the camera around you can easily see how it will change exposure to unacceptable settings with just a small inclusion of light or dark areas.

My only solution is back button focus as so many situations are rarely a single subject in the field of view. Even then I have had the camera jump to the background on a random frame.
 

Maximilian

The dark side - I've been there
Nov 7, 2013
2,594
408
Germany
... still love my 5Div, but wonder what will happen. ...
... I find myself passing the DSLR and reaching for the RP instead more and more...
JPAZ, thanks for sharing your thoughts and impressions.
Fits 100% into my expectation that this could be a really cool travel camera.

As I shoot a lot of movement (children, animals):
What do you think of the EVF? Delay? Etc.?
 
Mar 14, 2012
2,294
180
No camera really does. I have been frustrated with AF since the first EOS 630. Like any auto process, it can, and frequently does, make an automatic error. The mirrorless camera EVFs demonstrate their error facility when used in exposure simulation mode and any auto exposure mode. As you move the camera around you can easily see how it will change exposure to unacceptable settings with just a small inclusion of light or dark areas.

My only solution is back button focus as so many situations are rarely a single subject in the field of view. Even then I have had the camera jump to the background on a random frame.
Thanks! I'm now less tempted by the claims of the A9's awesome AF. Yes, the frame rate/black out rate could be improved for the R/RP, but I'd still be stuck with fighting the camera to get it to focus where I want.
 

JPAZ

If only I knew what I was doing.....
Sep 8, 2012
923
35
As I shoot a lot of movement (children, animals):
What do you think of the EVF? Delay? Etc.?
I have found the FPS to be more limiting than the EVF. Taking shots of active grandkids has not been a major issue. I honestly have not noticed a big problem with the refresh rate. But, since I've not done any sporting events or BIF with it, can't say how much an issue this can be in some circumstances. This, of course, is offset by the size and ease of grabbing the RP + RF 24-105 and going........

A friend shoots m4/3. He keeps his camera and a couple of lenses in his jacket pocket and gets some awfully good images of wildlife. Another friend shoots an A9 (unbelievable FPS with good focus) but the glass for Sony and the image colors are (arguably - don't flame me!) not what I achieve with Canon. I think the bottom line is knowing how to use what you've got and using it to its fullest capability.
 

JPAZ

If only I knew what I was doing.....
Sep 8, 2012
923
35
I'm now less tempted by the claims of the A9's awesome AF.
I have a good friend with a A9. His FPS and focus accuracy is impressive. But, something about the colors are.....well needs a lot more post processing, I think.
 

Mt Spokane Photography

I post too Much on Here!!
Mar 25, 2011
15,476
712
I like the R for a lot of things, but for sports I still prefer the 5D IV by a large margin.
As a result, I changed it work with how I'd use the 5D4. Select a AF point (usually 1/3 on either the left or right side depending which way the player is going) and put that point on subject and pan/track accordingly. That worked better, but I still didn't like it. The frame rate and the temporary freezing/blackout in the EVF was jarring compared the optical VF in the 5D4, so it was harder to track with the R. After about 15-20 minutes, I switched to the 5D4 and was much more productive.
Absolutely, for quickly moving subjects, the R is frustrating and I want to throw it out. However, I rarely shoot that type of thing. I did do some for two nights last week, and got far better results with my 5D MK IV and numerous shots with the R where the subject was partially out of the frame. To be able to compare, I did the first night with 70-200 on the R and 24-70 on the 5D MK IV so I could grab the camera I wanted based on the subjects. Then, the following night, I reversed lenses. Most shots were with the 70-200. I'm still wading thru them, but I lost a lot of shots due to poor exposures, the R does better, since it does adjust exposure based on the AF point. Lots of dark areas plus a subject in a very bright spotlight really can fool the auto exposure if you are shooting wide. I don't always have time to switch to spot.
 

Normalnorm

EOS 7D MK II
Dec 25, 2012
522
130
I have a good friend with a A9. His FPS and focus accuracy is impressive. But, something about the colors are.....well needs a lot more post processing, I think.
I have no axe to grind against Sony but the color issue is, IMO, overblown as the default color can always be adjusted. And if one is using a $4500 camera for JPGs I can't really entertain a serious conversation with them.
 

Normalnorm

EOS 7D MK II
Dec 25, 2012
522
130
Absolutely, for quickly moving subjects, the R is frustrating and I want to throw it out. However, I rarely shoot that type of thing. I did do some for two nights last week, and got far better results with my 5D MK IV and numerous shots with the R where the subject was partially out of the frame. To be able to compare, I did the first night with 70-200 on the R and 24-70 on the 5D MK IV so I could grab the camera I wanted based on the subjects. Then, the following night, I reversed lenses. Most shots were with the 70-200. I'm still wading thru them, but I lost a lot of shots due to poor exposures, the R does better, since it does adjust exposure based on the AF point. Lots of dark areas plus a subject in a very bright spotlight really can fool the auto exposure if you are shooting wide. I don't always have time to switch to spot.
The huge advantage of the EVF is the ability to see the exposure and adjust exposure as needed as contrasty situations are the bane of auto exposure no matter the hyperbole the manufacturers squeak.
 

AlanF

Canon 5DSR II
Aug 16, 2012
5,656
2,905
We all live in our particular ecological niche and choose our gear accordingly. A huge advantage of an EVF to you is a bane to me as an OVF is much better for my needs of staring though a viewfinder at birds or wildlife. As for having a lightweight all-in-one alternative for trekking, I tried originally to use a Canon G3X 24-600mm equivalent but it wasn't up to the job and I take the Sony 24-600mm now as it gives very respectable results.
 
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