Is a brand new 32.5mp APS-C sensor from Canon on the way? [CR1]

Danglin52

EOS T7i
Aug 8, 2018
55
40
Neither would that help, the sensor would still be a lot smaller than the one in 1DXII and the tech isn't that much newer.
As I said, it is a dream. I am getting older and would like to scale back on the heavy gear (1dx II + 200-400, etc.), but I just can't give up the high ISO capability of my 1dx II and the image quality produced by the big whites. I would much prefer that Canon use new tech to improve higher ISO & overall image quality rather than getting into a mpix race. I hope they are not following the strategy of keeping the performance the same and just adding more megapixels. It gets down to what is the point matching the MP spec of Sony/Nikon if you don't equal the performance.
 
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neonlight

EOS 80D
Jul 10, 2015
122
15
What i want is an improved 24-26 MP sensor which produces sharp images. I feel the current 7DII is somewhat soft.
As a 7DII user, that is what I would like too. 24MP is enough if it were sharp. Many have said that the softness of the 7DII is due to the AA filter. I've written to Canon too to ask for noAAF, I'd really be pleased if it competed with the N**** D500, but I've got too much Canon glass to change.
 
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blackcoffee17

EOS RP
Sep 17, 2014
212
179
As a 7DII user, that is what I would like too. 24MP is enough if it were sharp. Many have said that the softness of the 7DII is due to the AA filter. I've written to Canon too to ask for noAAF, I'd really be pleased if it competed with the N**** D500, but I've got too much Canon glass to change.
Yes, i think so too. At the moment i like images from all manufacturers better, Fuji, Sony and Nikon. But Canon's lens selection is still unmatched, especially in the tele range.
 
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Hector1970

EOS 6D MK II
Mar 22, 2012
1,079
256
Yes, i think so too. At the moment i like images from all manufacturers better, Fuji, Sony and Nikon. But Canon's lens selection is still unmatched, especially in the tele range.
Yes I'd agree too as I move up in ISO the 7DII image gets more and more squidgy. I've like a better quality 24MP rather than even more Megapixels.
 

jvillain

EOS T7i
Sep 29, 2018
87
72
This rumor makes more sense than the new 24MP one. But I also agree that 32.5 doesn't sound like Canon unless there is an RF mount APS-C coming and a replacement for the 5D IV is coming with a densor sensor. I suspect some thing more like 28MP. Time will tell.
 

hoodlum

EOS 80D
Jul 11, 2012
140
15
www.flickr.com
32mp would be fine if the sensor finally reached same IQ as Sony sensors. The pixel density would be the same as the latest 20mp m43 senor and you can always downscale back to 24mp for less noise while having greater detail when required.
 
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preppyak

EOS 6D MK II
Oct 18, 2011
984
54
  • ISO performance equal to or surpass my 1dxII
  • more dynamic range would be nice
  • Frame rate in the 12 FPS range with an unlimited RAW buffer
  • Full sensor width video @4k 60fps, although I am not a video shooter
Well...

The 7DII shoots ~10fps, though far from an unlimited RAW buffer. A new x0D might not even match that, and will take another iteration at least to reach that (so, maybe by 2022-ish?)

I'll be kind and say Canon saw about a stop high ISO noise reduction between the 60D and 80D (in ~6 years). So to get your 1DX performance, you're talking maybe 2030.

There's no indication we're getting uncropped 4k in any Canon body that doesnt say CINE going forward, and both sensor size and processing speed say Canon isnt putting 4k60 in any <$5k camera in the next gen cameras either. I'd be willing to bet Canon stops making APS-C DSLRs (and moves all mirrorless) before they put 4k60fps in one.

Fuji's the only company making something close to what you want in APS-C (in terms of fast shooting and 4k60), and Sony's a7 III is about as close as you'll get in terms of DR/ISO and fast shooting in any sized sensor.
 

mpb001

EOS T7i
Sep 10, 2016
57
37
I am not sure how they are going to push a 30+ MP crop sensor without it generating more noise at higher ISOs. Maybe they have some magic up their sleeve or its marketing. I personally think that Canon would be better off refining a 24 MP sensor or even a 20MP sensor if it would have fantastic low light capability.
 

Josh Leavitt

EOS T7i
Aug 19, 2018
91
102
Are the EOS M zooms up to the challenge of resolving 32.5MP? I'm honestly curious, not trolling EOS M. I know there's a couple of excellent primes in that system: 22mm F/2, 28mm F/3.5 Macro, and the new 32mm F/1.4 - and those could handle 32.5MP without any issues I'm sure, but are the variable aperture zooms (the bulk of the EOS M system) capable of resolving that level of detail?
 
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Randywayne

I'm New Here
Oct 9, 2018
23
24
As a 7DII user, that is what I would like too. 24MP is enough if it were sharp. Many have said that the softness of the 7DII is due to the AA filter. I've written to Canon too to ask for noAAF, I'd really be pleased if it competed with the N**** D500, but I've got too much Canon glass to change.
I shot with a 7D II for a few years as well and always felt like less than half of the pictures I took were ever "acceptably" sharp and VERY few were tack sharp. (My 5D IV is MUCH better!) It does seem like the AA filter should take much of the blame but also felt like I had a less than stellar copy of the camera since so many photos just seemed to miss focus completely.

My dream camera would be to take my a7III and drop it in the 7D II's tank like body -along with the Canon interface.
 

blackcoffee17

EOS RP
Sep 17, 2014
212
179
Are the EOS M zooms up to the challenge of resolving 32.5MP? I'm honestly curious, not trolling EOS M. I know there's a couple of excellent primes in that system: 22mm F/2, 28mm F/3.5 Macro, and the new 32mm F/1.4 - and those could handle 32.5MP without any issues I'm sure, but are the variable aperture zooms (the bulk of the EOS M system) capable of resolving that level of detail?
Why every lens need to resolve the maximum? If a zoom is only good for 24MP on the 32MP sensor, why is that worse than having a 24MP. At least you have an option to have higher resolution with a prime, a macro lens or high-end zoom.
 
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3kramd5

EOS 5D MK IV
Mar 2, 2012
3,080
399
Are the EOS M zooms up to the challenge of resolving 32.5MP? I'm honestly curious, not trolling EOS M. I know there's a couple of excellent primes in that system: 22mm F/2, 28mm F/3.5 Macro, and the new 32mm F/1.4 - and those could handle 32.5MP without any issues I'm sure, but are the variable aperture zooms (the bulk of the EOS M system) capable of resolving that level of detail?
No lens will resolve 32.5MP on a 32.5MP sensor. Resolution is roughly the product of the constituent elements. Improving one improves the whole.
 
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bgoyette

EOS T7i
Feb 6, 2015
92
39
At some point, more megapixels will become a negative for many buyers. I don’t know where that point is for the typical high Rez buyer, but at 70+ megapixels, i’m there.
I made several 40x60 and 44x65 inch landscapes for a client this week and 50mp is still holding on pretty well. I'm pretty happy with 50, and would probably take a little more DR and less shadow noise over more resolution, but I don't see an end, at least personally till we get into the triple digits.
 

bgoyette

EOS T7i
Feb 6, 2015
92
39
No lens will resolve 32.5MP on a 32.5MP sensor. Resolution is roughly the product of the constituent elements. Improving one improves the whole.
There are theoretical maximums for any pixel pitch and most of the best manufacturers produce lenses that meet (and exceed) those numbers in the center of the lens. I've yet to see a quality lens that isn't improved by a better sensor...we're not at the point where the best sensors are outpacing the best lenses.
 

Quarkcharmed

EOS 5DMkIV
Feb 14, 2018
462
310
Australia
www.michaelborisenko.com
If they actually release it, 32mp APS-C might make a good lightweight secondary landscape camera for hiking, providing it has a good DR. In fact it may become the only landscape camera for a lot of people.
But I suspect its DR will be around 80D, not 5DIV.
 

3kramd5

EOS 5D MK IV
Mar 2, 2012
3,080
399
we're not at the point where the best sensors are outpacing the best lenses.
Right, that’s a nonsensical situation. Making the lens better or the sensor better increases system resolution; as a whole it approaches the weakest link.
 

Chris Jankowski

6DII + various lenses, 200D + 15-85
Jul 27, 2013
49
7
Why don't CaNikon give big, bright 100% magnification OVFs for their top of the line APS-C bodies? That will be a really useful upgrade! Such EVFs are already available from PanyOly and Fuji on their action focused cameras.
Doesn't 7DII have just such an OVF?

100% magnification high quality bright OVF in the form of solid glass polished pentaprism is very costly, requires very precise adjustment during manufacturing process and is heavy. Only top class camera with a price tag to match can have it. The rest will have do with cheap pentaprism and smaller coverage and lower magnification.

In the mirrorless world all of these problems go away. EVF is opto-mechanically trivial, has 100% coverage with no adjustment by definition and brightness is adjusted electronically. Also the mirror dissapears and with it complex separate AF and AE sensors.

This is why we probably won't see 7DII replacement.

Please also note that other technical trade offs have changed. With the elimination of OVF, continued improvement of EVFs, falling prices of sensors and higher density of electronics the price difference in manufacturing an APS-C or full frame body becomes rather small. Hence, I think that the APS-C cameras will slowly fade away.

Around year 2000 there were full frame film SLRs on the market for about $500 for a body.

I think that in about 5-7 years we'll see a return of a full fram, interchangeable lenses camera body for about $500.

By this time the cameras will have electronic shutter. Thus they will no longer have any complex optical or mechanical parts in them except perhaps for sensor stabilisation. It will be all electronics. The only opto-mechanical components of complexity will be in lenses. And we know that electronics can be miniutarised, integrated and manufactured cheaply on automatic production lines. Camera bodies will become cheaper.
 
Aug 22, 2010
1,608
304
48
Uk
www.GMCPhotographics.co.uk
I shot with a 7D II for a few years as well and always felt like less than half of the pictures I took were ever "acceptably" sharp and VERY few were tack sharp. (My 5D IV is MUCH better!) It does seem like the AA filter should take much of the blame but also felt like I had a less than stellar copy of the camera since so many photos just seemed to miss focus completely.

My dream camera would be to take my a7III and drop it in the 7D II's tank like body -along with the Canon interface.
I felt the same way about the original 7D. An amazing camera in every respect but it was let down by a very poor sensor. In some ways the 7D paved the way for Canon's next gen AF system and pretty much led to the host of pro-body upgrades that led to the 5DmkIII. But I was never particularly happy with the image quality. Sure, I got some great images from it but I found the images noisier and softer than any other Canon DSLR I've owned and the RAW files couldn't take a lot of processing. But every thing else about the camera was amazing. Even at 400 iso I found noise every where. So I passed on the 7DII, which seemed to have similar issues. I loved the extra reach that the 1.6x crop offered and on paper the camera looked like a very capable 1DxII lite...but the image quality wasn't in the same league.
Instead I went for a pair of 5DIII's and haven't looked back. Still using them today....sure I'd like to upgrade to a pair of 5D4's but the mkIII's are still working well for me.
 
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Aug 22, 2010
1,608
304
48
Uk
www.GMCPhotographics.co.uk
Doesn't 7DII have just such an OVF?

100% magnification high quality bright OVF in the form of solid glass polished pentaprism is very costly, requires very precise adjustment during manufacturing process and is heavy. Only top class camera with a price tag to match can have it. The rest will have do with cheap pentaprism and smaller coverage and lower magnification.

In the mirrorless world all of these problems go away. EVF is opto-mechanically trivial, has 100% coverage with no adjustment by definition and brightness is adjusted electronically. Also the mirror dissapears and with it complex separate AF and AE sensors.

This is why we probably won't see 7DII replacement.

Please also note that other technical trade offs have changed. With the elimination of OVF, continued improvement of EVFs, falling prices of sensors and higher density of electronics the price difference in manufacturing an APS-C or full frame body becomes rather small. Hence, I think that the APS-C cameras will slowly fade away.

Around year 2000 there were full frame film SLRs on the market for about $500 for a body.

I think that in about 5-7 years we'll see a return of a full fram, interchangeable lenses camera body for about $500.

By this time the cameras will have electronic shutter. Thus they will no longer have any complex optical or mechanical parts in them except perhaps for sensor stabilisation. It will be all electronics. The only opto-mechanical components of complexity will be in lenses. And we know that electronics can be miniutarised, integrated and manufactured cheaply on automatic production lines. Camera bodies will become cheaper.
Yes I agree, I still think that there will always be a market for a 5Dx range of DSLR with it's mirror box and optical view finder. Some photographers (like me) will always prefer an optical view finder over an EVF. I think the fact that ef lenses work on both EF and RF mounts is an important feature going forwards. It opens up a photographer to both systems and allows both strengths to be utilised. But the 1.6x crop sensor range is a different market entirely. Price and size are paramount considerations. I can't see anyone choosing an higher priced OVF over an EVF especially considering the slew of XXXD users that have only one or two f5.6 zooms.

It's a curious thought that when Mr Lecia invented the 35mm format, he built it as a range finder design. The SLR mirror box / penta prism came later. It seems that the mirror less design is going back to what Mr Lecia originally designed or intended. His format was based on the 35mm film stock, so he could use the cheap film stock in a stills camera. Kind of funny to think of a 35mm camera as a cheap format. With a advent of movie modes in most modern DSLR's....things really have returned to their origins. The Eos R has pretty much become the Digital version of Lecia's original dream.
 
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