Lots of New mirrorless and DSLR cameras in the pipeline

docsmith

EOS Rebel T7i
Sep 17, 2010
727
54
#41
Edit- Not sure how I missed the DSLR reference on the "K" series APS-C bodies....some tweaks below to adjust.
---
That is a lot of cameras:
  • 4 "K" series: 1 FF mirrorless, 2 APS-C DSLR smirrorless, and 1 FF DSLR
  • 5 "EC" series: 2 APS-C, 2 Gx something, and 1 compact camera
Typically, hasn't the M been "EC?" Or are they "K" registrations as well? If they are "EC" that would open the door for the "EC APS-C" cameras to be the M5 II and M6 II. Then the "APS-C K" cameras would mean we have 2 "R" APS-C mirrorless cameras coming. Of course, the alternative is that we have two G series APS-C cameras coming and two with 1" sensors.

For now, I will assume it is the later (although R APS-C bodies would be interesting), and I would say we are looking at:
  • K433: 26 MP mirrorless FF camera. This is close to the current R and will need to be differentiated. High FPS and other pro characteristics should do that, so I am hopeful this is above the current "R". Alternative would be something truly entry level, but I think that should be down the road.
  • K435: 90D M5II. Fits the battery display. Hopefully canon is not recycling their sensor from the 80D, improvements are always good.
  • K436: A rebel, granted it is odd is also 24 MP, as the potential 90D. M6II
  • K437: 5DV (no other DSLR body makes sense, perhaps they want to differentiate from the R)
  • EC804 and EC808: G5x II and G7x III
  • EC811: M5 Mk II APS-C G3x II
  • EC812: M6 Mk II APS-C ???? different color G3x II???
 
Last edited:

Jack Douglas

http://www.gohaidagwaii.ca/blog/eagle-photography-
Apr 10, 2013
5,508
57
Alberta, Canada
#42
Is it possible that all the "pros" are not going to suddenly dump their 1DX2 level DSLR cameras and fall madly in love with the supposed mirrorless equivalent? I get the impression there are a lot of posts that are based on it being very important for "pros" to have the "hey look at me I have the latest technology", image. In other realms I often see the best craftsmen not having the latest tools; good tools but not necessarily the most expensive or newest.

The reason is simple. There is a significant amount of talent, skill and artistic ability that factors into the equation.

It made me think of the heated blade hockey skates that were endorsed by "The Great One". I Googled and 90% of the articles are 2007 or earlier.;)

Jack
 
Aug 26, 2015
214
32
#43
What we're looking at is a mirrorless 6D Mark II, compared to the EOS R it will have a cheaper EVF and LCD screen and with Digic 8.
It's not expected to be any different in terms of the features. Maybe priced around 1600$? (I would like it to be cheaper still, but it won't be)
Good stills camera, soft 1080p, but for filming people with a shallow DOF it may still do a decent job - definitely not great at filming detail though.

I wonder what the press what the press will think of it after the amount of trashing the 6D Mark II had received.
It certainly looks more 'rounded' as a mirrorless camera for 'enthusiasts'.
 
Dec 7, 2012
39
5
#46
The list is really disappointing to me. I have a 6D2 but am ready to move to 5D4 type specs (with advancements) in newer technology, ie mirrorless. Unfortunately it looks like my wait is going to be longer than I thought. No Canon purchases for me until they can deliver what I'm looking for. I'm sure I'm not alone. Come on Canon!
 
Likes: neelzito
Nov 12, 2016
236
45
#47
What are you guys so hung up on that cannot allow you to consider the EOS R a 5D level camera? Just because it doesn't have dual card slots? It doesn't have enough buttons? It's not big enough? It doesn't cost enough?

I mean, ok, I admit that it's not a technological advancement over the 5D Mark IV, which is pretty unfortunate after a couple years, but it is just about on-par with it.
 
Likes: tariqkieran
Oct 1, 2015
67
1
#49
There is one hard-stop here: if Canon wants the R series to be taken seriously, they need a 1DX2 equivalent before the 2020 Tokyo Olympic Games. That is a showcase not just for the athletes but also for the photographers; Nikon, Canon and Sony all out-do themselves for the pro community. And it's on their home-turf. It would be embarrassing if Nikon had the Z7-mark2 and Sony had the A9iv out there while Canon didn't have an ultimate R ready to go.

But photographers would have to trust that the mirrorless camera would perform, particularly autofocus, at that level. DPreview guys mentioned the sluggish performance of the R camera, (they might hate Canon of course), but that has been my experience with Sony mirrorless AF: very accurate and the eye AF works great, but slow and in low light can get lost. (saw a review last week talking about the flagship Sony AF doing something like that, shooting sports, sometimes great, once in awhile totally off.) I shoot mirrorless alongside my 5d4, and it would take a lot to get me to trust one shooting sports.
 
Likes: stevewhitemd
Jul 7, 2014
94
14
#50
... or get a dedicated video camera. :unsure:
Well, actually no. I do not want a dedicated video camera. I don't want to lug around tons of equipment when I am on vacation and choose whichever suits my need for the moment. I want ONE camera, dslr or mirrorless, that does both quite well. Other brands have them - Sony's very capable A73 and soon Panasonic's new full frame which will set the benchmark for video quality (once again). So why don't I just shut up and get one of those ?? I *would* if I weren't held hostage by my EF lenses.
 
Likes: Isaacheus
Apr 3, 2018
91
19
Calgary
#51
They're already struggling with getting data off the sensor of the EOS R, as evidenced by the worst-in-class FPS, worst-in-class 4K, worst-in-class AF tracking with continuous AF, etc. Upping the megapixels will simply compound this issue. DPAF is absolutely fantastic and incredibly novel, but it's hamstringing the hell out of their cameras.
And how do you know that they are struggling to get info off the sensor (hardware issue)? Canon has put out that they will be fixing the a couple of the issues with a firmware release which strongly suggests that it's a software issue.

Which also means that if they equip the higher spec'ed models with dual processors, they would have enough HP to compete with Sony and Nikon.
 
Jan 26, 2017
233
76
www.flickr.com
#52
What are you guys so hung up on that cannot allow you to consider the EOS R a 5D level camera? Just because it doesn't have dual card slots? It doesn't have enough buttons? It's not big enough? It doesn't cost enough?

I mean, ok, I admit that it's not a technological advancement over the 5D Mark IV, which is pretty unfortunate after a couple years, but it is just about on-par with it.
I wouldn't say I'm hung up on it - it isn't my decision on whether or not Canon sees it as a comparable product, and frankly it has no bearing on me. I just have a very hard time envisioning Canon releasing a "top tier" do-it-all camera for under $3000. That seems very out of character for Canon. Typically, Canon's cameras have been released as being slightly more expensive than the most directly-comparable cameras from other companies and this would be a departure from that if Canon doesn't plan on offering a mirrorless camera in the >$3000 price range. Further, during the release of the R Canon really presented this as a camera you add to your kit, not replace your kit and go fully mirrorless. If this was a viable alternative to a 5D IV I would have thought Canon would present it as a great opportunity to make a full switch (I could certainly be wrong - it has happened before ;)).

None of that has any bearing on the quality of the camera, it just seems out of character for a company that tends to price their bodies as being premium in the market.
 
Likes: nitram
#53
Is it possible that all the "pros" are not going to suddenly dump their 1DX2 level DSLR cameras and fall madly in love with the supposed mirrorless equivalent? I get the impression there are a lot of posts that are based on it being very important for "pros" to have the "hey look at me I have the latest technology", image. In other realms I often see the best craftsmen not having the latest tools; good tools but not necessarily the most expensive or newest.

The reason is simple. There is a significant amount of talent, skill and artistic ability that factors into the equation.

It made me think of the heated blade hockey skates that were endorsed by "The Great One". I Googled and 90% of the articles are 2007 or earlier.;)

Jack
I shoot professional motocross for different publications from time to time and I see 6d's, 7dmkii's, 1dx's 1dxii's,d4's and d5's all the time with lots of version one glass on those bodies. I use my 1dc and my dx2 for this because they are durable and they work, there is not much of a reason to upgrade when the tools you have work and consistently work, I will not be buying anything till my bodies die and even then I'll fix them before that. The full bodied slr is a beautiful thing. So with that if I think I won't replace anything then many other people who shoot professionally will not be rushing out to get anything new either because why replace what is sound and proven, especially with first gen tech. And the 4kvideo on the 1d's is amazing
 
#55
I don't see it happening. As I mentioned in another reply, they're already struggling with getting info off the sensor in a reasonable amount of time. There's NO WAY they'll be able to improve processing speed and power to the point that DPAF could support 20 FPS or more and I don't think there's any way they wouldn't put their marquee AF technology (DPAF) into their marquee body.
So how does the 1Dx2 manage? You have a sensor, AF mechanism and shutter that does 20 FPS. One could (in theory) move that into the R series. Yes, I know, lots of engineering, but to say that it couldn't be done is wrong -- it can't be done with the 30 MB sensor they have in the R right now, but it could be done.

Compounding that issue is a lack of native telephoto lenses. I see them beating the DSLR drum until the completion of the 2020 games, and maybe even 2022 or 2024. But don't worry, there are enough folks who bleed Canon red that it won't be a problem for them.
Here again, if they want the R series to be a serious, pro-level camera that is the wave of the future, the 2020 Olympics is the place to show that. Sure, you can do it later but you're missing the single-best opportunity. The World Cup, the Super Bowls, etc., don't match the Olympics in exposure, photographic challenges, etc. You could wait to 2024 but in the meantime Sony and Nikon are marching forward.

Native lenses: yes, a problem, and that's exactly why I'd be pushing like mad to get a good 70-200 f/2.8 and a 400 f/2.8 in RF mount done. That glass and the new RF glass just announced and the pro has enough to shoot in the Olympics (and other events); that spills over to the usual sports/fashion/wedding/industrial photography, etc. One of the reasons people say Canon has its lead is its lens catalog. Okay, Canon -- you introduced a new mount, now fill the catalog.
 
Nov 12, 2016
236
45
#56
Native lenses: yes, a problem, and that's exactly why I'd be pushing like mad to get a good 70-200 f/2.8 and a 400 f/2.8 in RF mount done. That glass and the new RF glass just announced and the pro has enough to shoot in the Olympics (and other events); that spills over to the usual sports/fashion/wedding/industrial photography, etc. One of the reasons people say Canon has its lead is its lens catalog. Okay, Canon -- you introduced a new mount, now fill the catalog.
You did see that they released an EF to RF adapter, right? I fail to understand why there is such an urgent need for these lenses with an RF mount when they already exist in EF and will work on any RF camera that's released. What is to be gained by making an RF version, except for perhaps slightly better image stabilization, which nobody seems to be complaining about on the current 70-200 and 400 2.8?
 
#57
You did see that they released an EF to RF adapter, right? I fail to understand why there is such an urgent need for these lenses with an RF mount when they already exist in EF and will work on any RF camera that's released. What is to be gained by making an RF version, except for perhaps slightly better image stabilization, which nobody seems to be complaining about on the current 70-200 and 400 2.8?
Of course; we've all seen that. New RF lens: lighter, smaller, ?? better optics. If Canon wants to signal that the R series is for demanding pros, they need the glass that serious pros will want to use. See the new 50 f/1.2 as an example.

Pros are smart -- and cheap! :) They don't buy new glass for the sake of new glass but because it fills a need. Sure, someone with a new EF 400 f/2.8 III isn't buying the RF anytime soon. But there are lots of working pros who would be in the market for new glass. Canon needs to have something for them.
 
Likes: nitram
Jul 4, 2018
30
7
Germany
#58
Previous predictions had 80d and 7d ii successors firmly placed in 2019.
I would be extremy disappointed if we would only get them in 2020 as other commenters have speculated.
Is there an Chanze this list is not complete and lets room for a 90d or 7d iii in 2019?
 
Likes: edmund22

ken

Engineer, snapper of photos, player of banjos
Aug 8, 2016
74
56
Huntsville, AL
#59
There are a lot of good points here, but consider that (according to the US Department of Labor) there are roughly 49,000 professional photographers in the United States. (see https://www.bls.gov/oes/current/oes274021.htm ) That's a pretty small number. (Compare to 183K Electrical Engineers, for example) I can't think of any reason that other countries would have significantly higher percentages of their population working in the field of photography.

So clearly Canon isn't making the cameras just for those pros. They're way too small of a group. So why has Canon always cared about the pros so much? Because of their influence. But you know who has come along and stolen a ton of the pro photographer's influence on the camera buying public? YouTube and Instagram influencers. Not trying to disparage the YouTubers, but a lot of them don't fit the "pro photographer" mold. They really are more focussed on talking about gear, unboxing new gear, giving advice, and being talking heads in general. But their influence has become huge. Things have changed. I'm sure Canon is well aware of it. Ask yourself: which has more influence? The brief glimpse of photogs at an Olympic event shooting with white lenses (which doesn't necessarily even mean Canon any longer), or a vlogger with over a million subscribers telling everyone their detailed opinions on a new Canon release?

I'm not trying to imply Canon doesn't care about the pro photographer. They clearly have some hard-won respect with their unrivaled CPS and they don't want to give that up. But I think a lot of commenters here credit the pro photographers as having way more influence on Canon's planning than they probably have at this point in time.
 
Nov 12, 2016
236
45
#60
Of course; we've all seen that. New RF lens: lighter, smaller, ?? better optics. If Canon wants to signal that the R series is for demanding pros, they need the glass that serious pros will want to use. See the new 50 f/1.2 as an example.

Pros are smart -- and cheap! :) They don't buy new glass for the sake of new glass but because it fills a need. Sure, someone with a new EF 400 f/2.8 III isn't buying the RF anytime soon. But there are lots of working pros who would be in the market for new glass. Canon needs to have something for them.
Yes, but for the tele and super-tele lenses, is there truly any optical advantage to the new mount? It's exactly the same diameter as EF, just a shorter flange distance. Since the current EF tele and super-teles already have their rear elements deep inside the back of the lens, it would seem that these lenses have nothing to gain optically from a mount that just has a shorter flange distance.

You can see from the RF lenses they are coming out with that they are focusing on the lenses that actually benefit from the shorter flange distance. The 28-70 f2 probably was not reasonably possible in EF mount, and I believe the new 50mm f1.2 has an optical design that would not be possible without the short flange distance. It does not appear that the teles and super-teles have so much to gain being RF lenses.