M5/M6 and EF-M Lens Questions

DanP

EOS M50
Dec 8, 2014
31
0
#1
I'm debating buying either the M5 or M6 with 18-150, 11-22 and possibly 22 prime (the 28 macro comes as a bonus), and 270EXII for an upcoming trip to Iceland and Ireland, rather than taking the 5DIII with 24-105, 16-35F4 and 600EX-RT, but have a few questions. For the M5 users, do you find the drag AF to be a very useful feature and. if so, how often do you use it and for what type of scene are you most likely to use it? For the M6 users, do you wish you had the same drag AF feature as the M5, or is moving the focus point sufficiently easy by other means? Do the B&W XS-Pro and F-Pro filters conflict with the lens hoods on the EF-M lenses and do the lens hoods reverse? Is the 270EXII fully compatible with both cameras? Finally, I don't see any reputable third party LP-E17 batteries available. Did Canon succeed in thwarting third party manufacturers from copying this battery?
 

Bennymiata

EOS Rebel SL2
Feb 14, 2012
684
2
#2
The drag focus is an excellent feature that I use all the time.
All Canon flashes will work with both the M5 and M6.
I don't use filters so can't answer that one, however you can carry a nice M5/6 outfit in a very small bag.
 

neuroanatomist

Spends too much time on this forum
Jul 21, 2010
22,966
54
#3
I have no problems selecting a focus point with a screen tap on the M6.

Filters are fine, I typically use XS-Pro but I see no reason F-Pro wouldn't work. The hoods for all the zoom lenses are standard bayonet mounts and can be reversed. The hoods for the primes are screw-on hoods, cannot be reversed (but they're small) and serve as the attachment method for a filter (you'd need a 22mm threaded filter to directly mount to the M28 lens, for example). For examples of hood attachment for the EF-M 28mm Macro, see the TDP review (by yours truly, the 22/2 review is in progress).

https://www.the-digital-picture.com/Reviews/Canon-EF-M-28mm-f-3.5-Macro-IS-STM-Lens.aspx

The 270EX II works well with the M6, I prefer it over the 90EX for a bit more power and the ability to bounce.

The M6, M11-22, M18-150, M22 and 270EX II is my typical travel kit when I'm not bringing the 1D X. The Think Tank Mirrorless Mover 20 holds that kit perfectly (with room for the M28 Macro to be squeezed in). The MM10 holds the M6, M18-150, and M11-22 as a snug fit.

Except for the M5 and third-party batteries, I have all of the gear you mentioned so feel free to ask if you have any more specific questions.
 
Likes: ahsanford

DanP

EOS M50
Dec 8, 2014
31
0
#4
I have no problems selecting a focus point with a screen tap on the M6.

Filters are fine, I typically use XS-Pro but I see no reason F-Pro wouldn't work. The hoods for all the zoom lenses are standard bayonet mounts and can be reversed. The hoods for the primes are screw-on hoods, cannot be reversed (but they're small) and serve as the attachment method for a filter (you'd need a 22mm threaded filter to directly mount to the M28 lens, for example). For examples of hood attachment for the EF-M 28mm Macro, see the TDP review (by yours truly, the 22/2 review is in progress).

https://www.the-digital-picture.com/Reviews/Canon-EF-M-28mm-f-3.5-Macro-IS-STM-Lens.aspx

The 270EX II works well with the M6, I prefer it over the 90EX for a bit more power and the ability to bounce.

The M6, M11-22, M18-150, M22 and 270EX II is my typical travel kit when I'm not bringing the 1D X. The Think Tank Mirrorless Mover 20 holds that kit perfectly (with room for the M28 Macro to be squeezed in). The MM10 holds the M6, M18-150, and M11-22 as a snug fit.

Except for the M5 and third-party batteries, I have all of the gear you mentioned so feel free to ask if you have any more specific questions.
Thanks Neuro.

I looked at the filter details on your M28 review. As I understand it, the ES-22 hood screws onto the small diameter threads on the lens (22mm) and if you want to use a filter with the hood you need to use a 43mm filter mounted on the hood. I don't see any 22mm filters on the B&H website (closest is 22.5mm), so I assume you can't mount a filter on the small diameter lens threads or these threads are actually 22.5mm??? Without the lens hood, I assume you can use a 43mm filter directly on the lens, but am uncertain whether this will cause a problem if the lights are being used.

On a picture of the M22 hood (EW-43), I don't see any external filter thread. Can a filter be mounted on this hood? If so, what size?
 

neuroanatomist

Spends too much time on this forum
Jul 21, 2010
22,966
54
#5
Apologies for being unclear. As you state, on the M28 the ES-22 mounts to 22mm threads on the lens, and to my knowledge there aren't filters (at least, not quality ones) in that size. You cannot mount a 43mm filter to the lens directly, you need the hood in place to mount a filter – IMO that's why Canon includes the hood with the lens (usually that's only for L-series lenses in North America, with rare exceptions like the 70-300 DO). The hood does block the built-in lights (but if you're not using the lights, the white panels can still show up as reflections on a subject, and the hood prevents that).

The M22/2 can directly mount a 43mm filter, or the EW-43 hood. The hood replicates the 43mm female threads, so with the hood mounted a filter can be 'stacked' onto the hood.
 

DanP

EOS M50
Dec 8, 2014
31
0
#6
Apologies for being unclear. As you state, on the M28 the ES-22 mounts to 22mm threads on the lens, and to my knowledge there aren't filters (at least, not quality ones) in that size. You cannot mount a 43mm filter to the lens directly, you need the hood in place to mount a filter – IMO that's why Canon includes the hood with the lens (usually that's only for L-series lenses in North America, with rare exceptions like the 70-300 DO). The hood does block the built-in lights (but if you're not using the lights, the white panels can still show up as reflections on a subject, and the hood prevents that).

The M22/2 can directly mount a 43mm filter, or the EW-43 hood. The hood replicates the 43mm female threads, so with the hood mounted a filter can be 'stacked' onto the hood.
Thanks for the clarification.
 

slclick

Matched Grip
Dec 17, 2013
2,626
8
#7
The touch and drag is amazing, my favorite feature on the M5. I've had the 18-150, 11-22 and the 22. The 22 has been my favorite and I'm not crazy about 35mm equivalent, I like it but not like ahsanford likes 50. However on the M5 it hits the sweet spot and focuses fast, renders nicely with good contrast and is discreet. It stays on mine like a body cap. The filters for EF-M lenses are tiny so they're cheap,I use the XS-Pro but without the hood on the 22 so I cannot comment there about vignetting issues. After using MFT for a year, the M5 was a welcome and intuitive system for me to compliment my FF kit.
 

AlanF

EOS 5DS R
Aug 16, 2012
3,737
43
#8
My 18-150mm arrived yesterday morning (from a kit broken up by a seller on eBay). It is one of Neuro's favourite lenses, which stimulated me to buy. I've now put through intensive chart testing and I am delighted. At 150mm, it matches my 100-400mm II mounted on the M5. Where it overlaps with my 11-22mm and 15-45mm, it beats both of them (the 11-22 and 15-45s are indistinguishable). So, like Neuro, it's the 11-22mm and 18-150mm for travel for me with the 22mm thrown in on the M5.
 

AlanF

EOS 5DS R
Aug 16, 2012
3,737
43
#9
My M5+18-150 slipped off a coffee table and dropped only 18"/45cm onto a soft carpet. The body came apart along the edge running from the top down to the battery compartment. The tongue and groove was crossed over but luckily I was able to get it straight with a thin steel blunt blade and the body snapped back. Phew. It shows how flimsy the camera is. For its price, the M5 deserved a better build. The 5Ds are so robust they can take a lot of punishment but the M5 scares me.
 

Rocky

EOS Rebel T7i
Jul 30, 2010
832
0
#10
My M5+18-150 slipped off a coffee table and dropped only 18"/45cm onto a soft carpet. The body came apart along the edge running from the top down to the battery compartment. The tongue and groove was crossed over but luckily I was able to get it straight with a thin steel blunt blade and the body snapped back. Phew. It shows how flimsy the camera is. For its price, the M5 deserved a better build. The 5Ds are so robust they can take a lot of punishment but the M5 scares me.
Wow, that is scary. Both of My M and M2 have taken much worse "punishment" and survive.
 
Aug 26, 2014
78
0
#11
I'm debating buying either the M5 or M6 with 18-150, 11-22 and possibly 22 prime (the 28 macro comes as a bonus), and 270EXII for an upcoming trip to Iceland and Ireland, rather than taking the 5DIII with 24-105, 16-35F4 and 600EX-RT, but have a few questions. For the M5 users, do you find the drag AF to be a very useful feature and. if so, how often do you use it and for what type of scene are you most likely to use it? For the M6 users, do you wish you had the same drag AF feature as the M5, or is moving the focus point sufficiently easy by other means? Do the B&W XS-Pro and F-Pro filters conflict with the lens hoods on the EF-M lenses and do the lens hoods reverse? Is the 270EXII fully compatible with both cameras? Finally, I don't see any reputable third party LP-E17 batteries available. Did Canon succeed in thwarting third party manufacturers from copying this battery?
Regarding your question about batteries: I use the batteries by Wasabi Power--which are the BTR-LPE17-JWP and look and perform just like the Canon branded ones. When using them I cannot tell the difference except that they do not have a chip in them so that the camera cannot display the level of battery change remaining and I have to have a backup with me. I get fabulous battery life because of the way I use the camera. I have about 6 batteries because the Wasabi ones are so reasonable. I carry the Wasabi charger when I'm traveling because it will charge either 1or 2 batteries at the same time and plugs into a USB plug on my extension cord. I had read multiple favorable reviews of the Wasabi batteries on DPReview M5 Message board.
Catherine WasabiM5.JPG
 

slclick

Matched Grip
Dec 17, 2013
2,626
8
#12
I use both Canon and Wasabi's in my M5. My only gripe is that in order to get a correct status indicator, you have to use the corresponding brands charger and not interchangeable.
 
Dec 8, 2014
31
0
#13
Regarding your question about batteries: I use the batteries by Wasabi Power--which are the BTR-LPE17-JWP and look and perform just like the Canon branded ones. When using them I cannot tell the difference except that they do not have a chip in them so that the camera cannot display the level of battery change remaining and I have to have a backup with me. I get fabulous battery life because of the way I use the camera. I have about 6 batteries because the Wasabi ones are so reasonable. I carry the Wasabi charger when I'm traveling because it will charge either 1or 2 batteries at the same time and plugs into a USB plug on my extension cord. I had read multiple favorable reviews of the Wasabi batteries on DPReview M5 Message board.
Catherine View attachment 179603
Thanks for your suggestion but I've already ordered two Canon batteries (which together cost substantially more than the last vehicle battery I bought). It looks like nobody has duplicated the chip for this battery.
 
#14
Wow, that is scary. Both of My M and M2 have taken much worse "punishment" and survive.
The original M (and, I imagine, the M2) was significantly more solid than the M5. I always liked that about the M. I do love my M5, it's a fantastic camera, but there is no denying that it feels very flimsy, very plasticky.

So to the OP, I get the appeal of taking an M5 instead of a 5D, but Iceland can have some seriously punishing weather (and Ireland is not all sunshine either). I personally wouldn't trust an M5 in harsh conditions. And harsh conditions are virtually guaranteed in these locations.

Oh, and to answer the original question: drag AF is awesome. I use it all the time, and find myself missing it on other cameras. On top of that, the implementation on the M5 is really good. I have an Olympus camera with a similar functionality, but I find it works much better, smoother on the M5. And the options to select the area where drag AF is active on the screen is perfect for customization.
 

Rocky

EOS Rebel T7i
Jul 30, 2010
832
0
#15
The original M (and, I imagine, the M2) was significantly more solid than the M5. I always liked that about the M. I do love my M5, it's a fantastic camera, but there is no denying that it feels very flimsy, very plasticky.

So to the OP, I get the appeal of taking an M5 instead of a 5D, but Iceland can have some seriously punishing weather (and Ireland is not all sunshine either). I personally wouldn't trust an M5 in harsh conditions. And harsh conditions are virtually guaranteed in these locations.

Oh, and to answer the original question: drag AF is awesome. I use it all the time, and find myself missing it on other cameras. On top of that, the implementation on the M5 is really good. I have an Olympus camera with a similar functionality, but I find it works much better, smoother on the M5. And the options to select the area where drag AF is active on the screen is perfect for customization.
I have used 20D, 40D, M. M2 even Leica M4 and a few point and shoot in heavy rain a lot of times. So far none of them has been damaged due to the rain. A poncho to cover yourself and the equipment will help. Wipe them inside the poncho as soon as possible.
"Picture must be taken, Let the equipment be damned"
 
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