Patent: Canon camera with in-body stabilization and in-lens stabilization working together.

caffetin

I'm New Here
Apr 20, 2019
19
6
Crazyrunner

To put things straight: Sony's IBIS and everything Sonyish are absolutely perfect!
Whoever pretends the opposite should be banned for life from this forum for proferring perverted subversive insanities.:devilish:
Shame on you!
Sony will never be as good as Canon or fuji. It is just no camera factory. Go to Sony services and see whats hapend Sony cameras. Yes it is Sonyish yellowish.
 

Antono Refa

EOS 7D MK II
Mar 26, 2014
777
87
Are EF lenses even firmware-upgradeable? I've already upgraded an RF lens and never upgraded any EF since getting into Canon in 1996.
Several Canon lenses had firmware updates. Some of the supertele lenses had firmware upgrades as well, but IIRC had to be shipped to a Canon authorized service center to get them.

All the lenses that had firmware updates (at least, those I'm aware of) are newer models, so I wouldn't bet on older models capable of having their firmware updated.
 

Mikehit

EOS 5D MK IV
Jul 28, 2015
3,169
375
Canon has a history of including capabilities in their new models (especially lenses) whose capabilities may not be realised for years afterwards when fully functional bodies are released. It is not beyond possibility that even EF lenses may have options for some form of dual-IBIS compatability. I am not saying the knew at the time precisely how it would work, but left things open.

Also, as far as I am aware, an IBIS camera body (on Panasonic and Olympus, anyway) simply needs to know the focal length of the camera so it can calculate the amount of correction and on those bodies if you are using a non-AF lens you manually enter the focal length and the camera does the rest. That should not be difficult to emulate in Canon bodies.
Also, for lenses with in-lens IS, some Panasonic bodies the dual IS works by letting the lens IS do the donkeywork and the IBIS just perfects it by adding correction for translational movements. So there is precedent.
 

koenkooi

EOS RP
Feb 25, 2015
293
143
Canon has a history of including capabilities in their new models (especially lenses) whose capabilities may not be realised for years afterwards when fully functional bodies are released. It is not beyond possibility that even EF lenses may have options for some form of dual-IBIS compatability. I am not saying the knew at the time precisely how it would work, but left things open.
[..]
I think that this is the actual reason Canon did the 70-200 f/2.8L III update, not "just new coatings" as Canon says. I have zero proof for this, though :)
 

BillB

EOS 6D MK II
May 11, 2017
980
201
Canon has a history of including capabilities in their new models (especially lenses) whose capabilities may not be realised for years afterwards when fully functional bodies are released. It is not beyond possibility that even EF lenses may have options for some form of dual-IBIS compatability. I am not saying the knew at the time precisely how it would work, but left things open.

Also, as far as I am aware, an IBIS camera body (on Panasonic and Olympus, anyway) simply needs to know the focal length of the camera so it can calculate the amount of correction and on those bodies if you are using a non-AF lens you manually enter the focal length and the camera does the rest. That should not be difficult to emulate in Canon bodies.
Also, for lenses with in-lens IS, some Panasonic bodies the dual IS works by letting the lens IS do the donkeywork and the IBIS just perfects it by adding correction for translational movements. So there is precedent.
In 2012, Roger Cicala at Lensrental posted that recent EF lenses (40mm, 28mmIS etc) could report back to recent EOS DSLR's (5DIII) making PDAF much more accurate and comparable to manual and live view contrast detect. https://wordpress.lensrentals.com/blog/2012/08/autofocus-reality-part-3b-canon-cameras/ It seems likely that EF lenses and EOS cameras made since 2012 have had this iterative communications capability.
 
Reactions: pj1974

shutterlag

EOS T7i
Mar 5, 2013
59
1
When Canon does implement anything they do it right. I wonder when....
I would strongly dispute that. The video capabilities their DSLRs, their EOS-M line, and now their first two RF mount bodies are absolute garbage compared to the competition. You can find $400 m4/3s bodies that shoot far better video. I miss shooting Canon, but I'm not lugging a 2nd body around just for video.
 

MartinF.

EOS 6D, 5D and some good EF lenses
Feb 2, 2016
57
34
Denmark
I can't imagine them disabling IBIS for non-IS EF lenses. That would go against everything they've done so far to make the adapter fully functional for EF lenses. They also seem to be leaning heavily on EF for affordable lenses at the moment.

I do agree that the EF mount may not have enough throughput to coordinate OIS+IBIS, so there may be a limitation there with EF lenses.
I makes perfect sense from a technical point of view as well from a marketing point of view (making RF lenses to stand out), that IBIS+IS will be for RF lenses only. However a EF lense with no IS (as 24-70 f/2.8) will benefit from IBIS in an RF body. (but the buyer of an prof "R-series" camera will probably but at least a couple of RF lenses to do the daily work.
Canon is a high tech engineering company, but they are also very good at marketing, and product differentiation.
 

Kit.

EOS 6D MK II
Apr 25, 2011
999
466
I makes perfect sense from a technical point of view as well from a marketing point of view (making RF lenses to stand out), that IBIS+IS will be for RF lenses only.
It doesn't. Canon is not a monopoly in FF mirrorless, they cannot afford crippling their own products.
 
Reactions: Pape

MartinF.

EOS 6D, 5D and some good EF lenses
Feb 2, 2016
57
34
Denmark
It doesn't. Canon is not a monopoly in FF mirrorless, they cannot afford crippling their own products.
No - it is not a monopoly, but it has always been Canons strategy to divide their cameras into consumer segments. So does Nikon, so does almost every other manufacturer in a lot of other industries, also computer and cell phone industry.
Even Sony with their A9 model and different models in the A7 series. (but not in the same extend as Canon I agree).
However if the hardware is 100% identical (which it often is not) it is very difficult to cripple functionality in software alone. (but Windows OS is an example of that).
That is market segmentation and the high-end users pay premium prices for products that is not produced in as high volumes than the cheaper ones for the average consumer.
 
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Kit.

EOS 6D MK II
Apr 25, 2011
999
466
No - it is not a monopoly, but it has always been Canons strategy to divide their cameras into consumer segments.
And what relation does it have at all to an idea of not supporting in-body roll stabilization on pro RF cameras with pro EF lenses?
 

MartinF.

EOS 6D, 5D and some good EF lenses
Feb 2, 2016
57
34
Denmark
And what relation does it have at all to an idea of not supporting in-body roll stabilization on pro RF cameras with pro EF lenses?
It is actually an guess from another user, and only relate to EF lenses with IS. The guess is that having IS and IBIS working together on the EF dataprotocol could be a problem becuase of slow datacommunication between EF lens and "R-series" body.
 

Kit.

EOS 6D MK II
Apr 25, 2011
999
466
It is actually an guess from another user, and only relate to EF lenses with IS. The guess is that having IS and IBIS working together on the EF dataprotocol could be a problem becuase of slow datacommunication between EF lens and "R-series" body.
In-body roll stabilization does not require fast data communication (as a lens is not able to do roll stabilization anyway).

Canon also has a patent for a backward-compatible faster EF mount communication, but that's another story.
 

caffetin

I'm New Here
Apr 20, 2019
19
6
I think this patent is under consumer pressure but it is not very rational.(on my opinion).try to clean the sensor and starts the problems.for photography I would like not have in body stab.