Patent: Canon Image Sensor Stabilization

mb66energy

EOS 6D MK II
Dec 18, 2011
1,183
136
Germany
www.MichaelBockhorst.de
It looks like there is tilt. But there pictures in the article do not show the top view of the 8A piece. That could be the rotational piece?
I think it has some rotational component. There are two left-right-arrows called mb and mc (m for motion?) and one up-down-arrow called ma.
Using mb and mc coordinated (in one direction) + ma you have xy shifting
Using mb and mc in opposite directions (e.g. mb to the left and ma to the right) you have a rotation
Combining both motion types you can counteract any type of rotation and shifting (within the limits of the acceleration sensor / electronics / actors).

Tilting the sensor is IMO not very helpful because it changes the focal plane. Maybe interesting in macro where you can do some tilting but I think the majority of cases will be done first!
 

Lurker

EOS 80D
Dec 8, 2012
147
15
Does the IBIS also available in DSLR ? :unsure:
Canon has written a white paper on IBIS for the DSLR, they think it is impractical.

The main problem is trying to keep the view finder image in sync with the sensor image. To do this you have to have the mirror assembly and sensor on the same IBIS controlled platform. If you don't stabilize both devices the image may be stable on the sensor but the image in the view finder will be moving around. The photographer couldn't know what the on sensor image looked like. This is why they decided ILIS was the superior solution.

I'm not sure why so many think IBIS won't happen on a mirrorless. With electronic view finder being fed off the image sensor the mirror box issue goes away. Canon could well decide that IBIS, at least hybrid-IBIS, has value. Do they see value in a combination of ILIS and IBIS? They have at least explored this option. Is the combo better than an advanced IBIS system like is found in other cameras? Time will tell.
 
Reactions: CanonFanBoy

lenspacker

Canon EF 300mm f/2.8L IS II USM
Sep 7, 2018
9
4
canon must learn - - the most discussed feature of the new R-system was the lack of IBIS -nikon, sony, panasonic has it at their FF - - and the way of canon to put IS on the objects is a fail, because they produces good lenses without IS furthermore - also for the R-system (f2, 28-70mm, 1,2 50mm) but a lot of people won`t buy such a system - for them this is the right moment to change to another system, because you have to buy a lot of new gear - and instead of canon, they will buy nikon and their new lenses etc. So canon must have IBIS - its very important for them - or they have to put an IS in EVERY lens
 

mirage

EOS RP
Jul 31, 2018
297
111
Actually, yes... Minolta 7D was the first consumer DSLR to offer IBIS many years ago.
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image_stabilization
There are some others.
thanks for the info/reminder. the demise of Minolta and their sale to an ignorant copy machine maker (Konica) is still regrettable.

my "no" was in regard to IBIS in Canon EOS DSLRs. I do not think it will happen even though technically possible. I do expect IBIS in (some/many/most) future models of Canon's EOS R mirrorfree lineup.
 

Architect1776

Defining the poetics of space through Architecture
Aug 18, 2017
173
137
117
Williamsport, PA
hehehe, here we go! It will come in 2nd gen EOS R bodies. After you all spent money on first gen. Shortly thereafter comes "Mk. II, now with IBIS" :p:D
Agreed, I wait on such things as well or buy the old if good when the new comes out due to great price reductions.
 

BurningPlatform

EOS T7i
Mar 4, 2014
66
13
thanks for the info/reminder. the demise of Minolta and their sale to an ignorant copy machine maker (Konica) is still regrettable.

...
More like a merger, though. And Konica was a well established brand in photography as well. For instance, they pioneered AF in cameras in 1977. And of course, Sony bought their combined camera business later and here we are.
 

mirage

EOS RP
Jul 31, 2018
297
111
Konica may have fooled around with some AF lab models or prototypes. But Minolta brought the first SLR [7000] with AF to market in 1985. Minolta *pioneered* AF. Konica was never anything more than some "also-ran", lower-tier company. Not only in imaging products, but also in copiers. It is a shame that Konica was able to buy out Minolta for close to nothing after useless Honeywell had managed to bring Minolta to their knees with a (frivolous) patent infringement legal war.
 

al2

I'm New Here
Sep 15, 2012
22
0
I have been thinking about IBIS for a while now and I have more questions than answers right now. Maybe someone here can help me out or can point me in the right direction.

My understanding is that with in-lens stabilization the center of the desired image is manipulated in the lens to stay in the center of the lens image circle and the center of the sensor. With IBIS the desired image moves around in the stationary image circle and the sensor moves to keep the desired image on the sensor.

Questions:
  • How much does the sensor have to move?
  • Does it move so little that it can stay inside the image circle of all lenses? Or, does it require lenses with oversized image circles?
  • Even if the image circle will completely cover the complete range of IBIS motion, won’t there be many times when one side of the image (the one moved farthest from the center of the image circle) shows high levels of vignetting and degraded image quality?
 

bhf3737

---
Sep 9, 2015
372
227
Calgary, Canada
www.flickr.com
canon must learn - - the most discussed feature of the new R-system was the lack of IBIS -nikon, sony, panasonic has it at their FF - - and the way of canon to put IS on the objects is a fail, because they produces good lenses without IS furthermore - also for the R-system (f2, 28-70mm, 1,2 50mm) but a lot of people won`t buy such a system - for them this is the right moment to change to another system, because you have to buy a lot of new gear - and instead of canon, they will buy nikon and their new lenses etc. So canon must have IBIS - its very important for them - or they have to put an IS in EVERY lens
Why is that so? Because grass is presumably greener in "other camera makers" land?
IBIS is effective when "handheld shooting" with "lenses of short focal length" and in "good light". But it also introduces some unwanted hindrance to design, usage and reliability of the camera. Perhaps click bait reviewers all want it. But photographers may want to have a choice based on their real needs.
 
Reactions: Del Paso

mirage

EOS RP
Jul 31, 2018
297
111
Why is that so? Because grass is presumably greener in "other camera makers" land?
IBIS is effective when "handheld shooting" with "lenses of short focal length" and in "good light". But it also introduces some unwanted hindrance to design, usage and reliability of the camera. Perhaps click bait reviewers all want it. But photographers may want to have a choice based on their real needs.
Nikon put IBIS in their Z cameras for good reasons. It should be and will be implemented in future mirrorfree Canon EOS R cameras. It will of course work in combo with IS in lenses.

IBIS is more useful to more users and more situations than eg 4k video that goes mostly unused in practice.

Also, if IBIS can be switched on/off by user, everybody has their choice.

so - where's the problem?
 

koenkooi

EOS RP
Feb 25, 2015
241
106
Nikon put IBIS in their Z cameras for good reasons. It should be and will be implemented in future mirrorfree Canon EOS R cameras. It will of course work in combo with IS in lenses.

IBIS is more useful to more users and more situations than eg 4k video that goes mostly unused in practice.

Also, if IBIS can be switched on/off by user, everybody has their choice.

so - where's the problem?
Have a look at this article. I'm a bit more inclined to believe what Panasonic's PR department says since they removed IBIS from a new model instead of never having had it like Canon. Still, it's PR so have a few grains of salt ready.