Patent: Canon Image Sensor Stabilization

bhf3737

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Sep 9, 2015
361
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Calgary, Canada
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so - where's the problem?
Please try to take some picture with say Fuji XH1 and its 100-400mm lens with IBIS only and OIS switched off.
-- or -- with fujifilm 16-55mm take picture of a family birthday party when the light is off and kid is blowing the candles.
-- or -- with fujifilm 90mm a portrait indoors without light modifiers.
You will see the problem. And there is no way to switch the IBIS off on that camera.
I thought XH1 is a "pro body" and IBIS is icing on the cake, but ended up trading it for a camera without.
 

mirage

EOS RP
Jul 31, 2018
297
111
Have a look at this article. I'm a bit more inclined to believe what Panasonic's PR department says since they removed IBIS from a new model instead of never having had it like Canon. Still, it's PR so have a few grains of salt ready.
sounds like a justification attempt for a cost-saving measure. for the specific video-centric camera model the assumption of tripod use may apply. but definitely not for cameras like EOS R.
 

mirage

EOS RP
Jul 31, 2018
297
111
Please try to take some picture with say Fuji XH1 ...
-- or -- with fujifilm 16-55mm take picture of a family birthday party when the light is off and kid is blowing the candles.
sure, IS does not help against motion blur with moving subjects and long shutter times.

but it does help against blur from camera shake.
 

mirage

EOS RP
Jul 31, 2018
297
111
Question: can (or does current) sensor stabilization have unique settings for each lens or camera motion?
in-lens IS uses sensors/gyros to determine direction and amount of movements. Lens-specific actuators and algorithms move a lens group as needed to keep image centered.

in-body sensor IS does not have to be lens- or camera-specific. sensor input plus software that analyzes image from sensor in real time and determines actuator inputs to position sensor so that image stays centered on it. No matter, what lens may be attached to camera.

if lens has IS, some smart algorithms make sure the 2 systems work in sync and don't counteract each other.
 
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jolyonralph

Kodak Brownie
Aug 25, 2015
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London, UK
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It's possible that IBIS would need to be disabled (automatically) with current lenses that have IS, unless both the lens and the body are capable of working together to control lens IS and body IBIS concurrently for best results.

To do that would probably be impossible via the EF mount as it is now (I don't believe it has any facility for IS-data communication) and would therefore rely on the RF mount.

So. This means that flange distance has little to do with the eventual demise of the EF mount, and everything to do with the increased communication speed.
 

mirage

EOS RP
Jul 31, 2018
297
111
So. This means that flange distance has little to do with the eventual demise of the EF mount, and everything to do with the increased communication speed.
i don't see anything that would support this conclusion. :)

Faster communication is one important feature of the new RF mount. But definitely not the only or the most important one. Significantly "larger optical design space" thanks to RF mount parameters is even more important. :)
 
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jolyonralph

Kodak Brownie
Aug 25, 2015
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i don't see anything that would support this conclusion. :)
Because you can almost rule out having dual IBIS & lens IS on the EF mount (it can be done, but not optimally) so if Canon were to launch a camera with IBIS it would only work in combined IBIS/IS mode with RF lenses, not with adapted EF glass. Which means the next generation of in-lens IS will require RF - and probably the reason that Canon have been indecisive about whether to do the 24-70 f/2.8L IS in the EF mount (with old style IS) or just on RF.
 

3kramd5

EOS 5D MK IV
Mar 2, 2012
2,853
266
in-body sensor IS does not have to be lens- or camera-specific. sensor input plus software that analyzes image from sensor in real time and determines actuator inputs to position sensor so that image stays centered on it. No matter, what lens may be attached to camera.
Canon’s M50 system works with image analysis to determine cropping in a frame by frame basis.

The IBIS systems in Olympus, Sony, etc. measure camera movement with gyros and compensate with sensor actuation. That’s why they need to know the focal length and focus distance of the lens to work properly.
 
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