Patent: Further breakdown of Canon’s upcoming IBIS technology

Pape

EOS RP
Dec 31, 2018
303
156
You're missing the fact that none of the "premium" RF lenses released to date are stabilized. What's your solution here???
To use cheaper f2 f2,8 lenses what usually got IS ,let studio photographers and daylight artists have their uncompromiced top lenses.
 
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unfocused

EOS 5D SR
You're missing the fact that none of the "premium" RF lenses released to date are stabilized. What's your solution here???
Well...others have answered your question...but let me add.

The existence of non-stabilized lenses is an argument in favor of stabilization generally, but not an argument in favor of in-body stabilization over in-lens stabilization.

Also, your sample size is so small it is not valid. So far, Canon has announced a grand total of 10 RF lenses. Six of those lenses have IS. One of those includes the IS 24-70 f2.8 zoom, a lens not available with IS in EF mount (from Canon).

Honestly, I've grown a bit tired of this discussion. Several people have raised legitimate benefits, others have completely missed the point. I have the information I needed to make an informed decision. I think others probably do too by now.
 

Juangrande

I'm New Here
Mar 6, 2017
14
16
I don't -need- it, but recent experience makes it something I'd like to see

It adds IS to my non IS lenses as an option - that's my expensive TS-E ones mainly
It gives the possibility of multi-shot high res imaging (see my earlier post and link)
If it works with lens IS, then I get even better IS for times it really helps me

I was so-so on it until I had the Panasonic S1R here for the review.

Downsides are that it tends to be more sensitive and prone to mechanical failure than not having it.
I don't -need- it, but recent experience makes it something I'd like to see

It adds IS to my non IS lenses as an option - that's my expensive TS-E ones mainly
It gives the possibility of multi-shot high res imaging (see my earlier post and link)
If it works with lens IS, then I get even better IS for times it really helps me

I was so-so on it until I had the Panasonic S1R here for the review.

Downsides are that it tends to be more sensitive and prone to mechanical failure than not having it.
I can’t imagine using a tilt shift lens without a tripod, unless maybe for creative portraits/fashion, but then I’d probably still put it on a tripod.
 

keithcooper

EOS 7D MK II
TS-E lenses work just as well hand held or on a tripod ;-)

You just need to practice rather more, but once you get the hang of it, being able to add a bit of shift gives extra flexibility (I don't actually use tilt very often - then mainly for technical purposes).

My 24/17 TS-E lenses are my walk round preferences for cities and landscape, both of which are times I'm unlikely to have a tripod with me
 
Sep 2, 2018
3
3
"We expect to see Canon’s IBIS technology to arrive in the next major EOS R series camera. "

Let's hope so, and soon!!
Many posts here are redolent of the period when Canon first introduced IS. I recall one forum poster who declared they'd never accept "wobbly bits" in their lenses! Another who said Nikon would never go beyond their first VR lens (a 100-400 IIRC?), years after Canon had IS across their entire "super" tele line.
I actually dumped all my Nikon gear, including the 800mm f/5.6 in order to get the Canon 600/4 IS when it was introduced. To my purpose, no feature was more essential than IS. I still feel that way. What has changed is that Canon is no longer a leader. While my 600/4 is gone, I still have the 300/2.8 IS.
IBIS is where it's at for me. I have been teetering on getting into Sony because of their mirrorless/IBIS bodies. Not sure I can wait for Canon. They're awfully slow to catch up. So different from how it was 15 years ago. :( Make no mistake! People are hesitating to buy Canon bodies precisely because they lack IBIS!
 
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