Patent: Here is Canon’s IBIS unit

20Dave

EOS T7i
Jan 19, 2013
60
4
I was thinking in terms of the subjects. 400 mm primarily used for wildlife, birds and sports. I suppose for a large slow moving mammal at rest or a bird sitting in a tree you might be able to shoot at 1/50 of a second, but that's not generally my experience.
It can be relatively dark in the canopy of the woods when going birding, even on a sunny day. I'm not catching warblers in flight in this scenario, they are always in trees, bushes, etc. So in this (relatively common) scenario, getting my 400mm down to 1/50 of a second would be awesome for me. Even if I had the 100-400 with IS, I'm guessing that I would still welcome the IBIS.

I would guess that it would be much less useful for action sports or BIF photos, but I don't have experience there.
 

CanonFanBoy

EOS 5D SR
Jan 28, 2015
4,172
1,756
Irving, Texas
What would you shoot at 1/50 with a 400mm lens?
As of late, I have shot a model when using a 6 stop ND filter at 1/60 sec at f/1.2, so I guess there are kinds of different cases when IBIS would come in very handy. I nailed some of those and didn't some of the others. The filter was necessary for the situation.... plus, until a couple of days ago I did not own a 3 stop in that size. ;) My shaky hands could use IBIS. It works very well on my Olympus, but I wouldn't use that camera on a shoot. I'm not saying IBIS is one size fits all, but for shorter focal lengths and slow shutter speeds with no lens IS, it is very nice. I never found it worked very well on M4/3 at long (400mm) focal lengths.
 

Canfan

I'm New Here
Jul 17, 2019
11
5
please educate me, under what circumstances would 5-6 stops IBIS be useful ?
How about high megapixel sensor?
Like the rumored 83 MP sensor?
Many have complained about the difficulty they face getting a sharp image as these sensors tend to be less forgiving.

You’ll be amazed how having this extra buffer may improve or change your style or open up new opportunities for you.
 

masterpix

EOS 80D
Jun 29, 2016
147
101
The 7D Mark III is dead (actually never concieved). Long live the 90D!
Sorry to say but the 90D is almost identical to the 7DII, beside the 32.5MP sensor and the less rigid body (and two memory cards slots) there is no significant differnce.
 
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masterpix

EOS 80D
Jun 29, 2016
147
101
please educate me, under what circumstances would 5-6 stops IBIS be useful ?
There are many ways it can help you, for example:

You are taking a wild life pictures, and those animals, as usual, do no cooperate with you and tend to move, so you like to have a wide field of view while still ahve a fast speed and not as high ISO (for the noise it brings) so instead of using speed 1/1000 which force you to the f:3.5 you now can do that same with.. lest see.. 1/1000 at f:11? at the same ISO?

Another thing, you are going into a sport event, where speed is very intense, so uptil now, you have to use your lowest 5.6 to get those pictures at 1/400 or so, but they usualy are a bit smudge for you both move the camera to follow the players and they also move rather fast, now you so the same at 1/2000 and increase the f to 8.0. In these speeds you can also zoom narrower on the object for you know that their moves will be captured crisply on a more "closed frame".

Lets say I am in a wedding and like to cpature as many people "in focus" for the family pictures, using 1/125 as the favorit speed, I can now use f:16 or even more which will capture both couple and the aunt they forgot her name long ago, but iwll be pissed as hell if her hair style won't be in focus!

just some ideas to show the benefits.
 

Normalnorm

EOS 7D MK II
Dec 25, 2012
538
142
please educate me, under what circumstances would 5-6 stops IBIS be useful ?
Very helpful when using the affordable but excellent f4 lenses.
When I used film, I often shot indoors with a 35 f2 and 400 film. These days I use a 24-105 or a 16-35 f4 and often find myself at 1600 ISO and well above.
I was on a job the other day that needed 12,800 and a lot at 10,000 and I would have welcomed even a 2 stop advantage.
 

unfocused

EOS 1D MK II
Jul 20, 2010
5,049
1,432
66
Springfield, IL
www.mgordoncommunications.com
There are many ways it can help you, for example:

You are taking a wild life pictures, and those animals, as usual, do no cooperate with you and tend to move, so you like to have a wide field of view while still ahve a fast speed and not as high ISO (for the noise it brings) so instead of using speed 1/1000 which force you to the f:3.5 you now can do that same with.. lest see.. 1/1000 at f:11? at the same ISO?

Another thing, you are going into a sport event, where speed is very intense, so uptil now, you have to use your lowest 5.6 to get those pictures at 1/400 or so, but they usualy are a bit smudge for you both move the camera to follow the players and they also move rather fast, now you so the same at 1/2000 and increase the f to 8.0. In these speeds you can also zoom narrower on the object for you know that their moves will be captured crisply on a more "closed frame".

Lets say I am in a wedding and like to cpature as many people "in focus" for the family pictures, using 1/125 as the favorit speed, I can now use f:16 or even more which will capture both couple and the aunt they forgot her name long ago, but iwll be pissed as hell if her hair style won't be in focus!

just some ideas to show the benefits.
I'm hoping you are being sarcastic and I just missed that. Otherwise, it is clear from your examples that you have absolutely no idea how image stabilization works.
 

CanonFanBoy

EOS 5D SR
Jan 28, 2015
4,172
1,756
Irving, Texas
I think it has a lot of room for movements parallel to the focal plane, but not sure if there's any patent that allows tilting.
I don't think any patent would allow or disallow tilting. Patents are not rules or regulations. My main question would be cost. I am breaking my neck to afford this system. IBIS would make me even more interested, but glass first. ;) I'm 56 years old. I would imagine this to be the last system I'd buy into short of a lottery win. :)
 

Quarkcharmed

EOS 5DMkIV
Feb 14, 2018
549
424
Australia
www.michaelborisenko.com
I don't think any patent would allow or disallow tilting.
This particular one doesn't, as far as I can see (fig. 20g, 20f on the top show movements along axis but not any rotation).

Patents are not rules or regulations. My main question would be cost. I am breaking my neck to afford this system. IBIS would make me even more interested, but glass first. ;) I'm 56 years old. I would imagine this to be the last system I'd buy into short of a lottery win. :)
I'm just curious if there was any sign of sensor tilt development, not that I can tell Canon to include it in a future camera. It'd prefer to have a sensor tilt rather than IBIS, although IBIS alone would be really really nice.
 

masterpix

EOS 80D
Jun 29, 2016
147
101
I'm hoping you are being sarcastic and I just missed that. Otherwise, it is clear from your examples that you have absolutely no idea how image stabilization works.
The whole idea of image stabilization is to allow you better hand held option (decrease hand help vibrations), I think I missed saying that in the begining :)