Patent: Here is Canon’s IBIS unit

Antono Refa

EOS 6D MK II
Mar 26, 2014
864
135
Why does the IBIS unit have the option to move the sensor along the optical axis?

As far as I understand, the lens focuses the light (makes the light rays converge) to a certain distance from the flange, so if the sensor is moved closer or farther away from it, the whole image would be out of focus.
 

Mt Spokane Photography

I post too Much on Here!!
Mar 25, 2011
15,544
768
It looks simple to make, but if you take into consideration the tolerances that need to be achieved, I don't think you can just rely on stamped frames.
Why, they don't do anything but let the magnets slide. The patent does not include position feedback sensors. It does state that the metal pieces are sheet metal, (non magnetic stainless). Stamped parts can have very tight tolerances, I've worked with suppliers to have parts stamped to amazing tolerances. Low tolerances are cheaper, but you can get what you need.
 

Mt Spokane Photography

I post too Much on Here!!
Mar 25, 2011
15,544
768
Why does the IBIS unit have the option to move the sensor along the optical axis?

As far as I understand, the lens focuses the light (makes the light rays converge) to a certain distance from the flange, so if the sensor is moved closer or farther away from it, the whole image would be out of focus.
Or in focus if the photographer is hand holding a camera and sways forward or backwards, or if the subject is moving.

However, you can let the lens autofocus compensate for that, so little need for is on the
Sports where you want to keep your ISO low and possible 2.8 shots for beautiful crushed backgrounds while hand jding lets say a 2.8 300mmII as an example.
IBIS and IS do not stabilize moving subjects as in sports. It corrects for movement of the camera with a stationary or slightly moving subject, but not for sports. There are limited cases where say one axis of stabilization while panning can be used for race cars if they are just moving in one axis.
 

Mt Spokane Photography

I post too Much on Here!!
Mar 25, 2011
15,544
768
Why does the IBIS unit have the option to move the sensor along the optical axis?

As far as I understand, the lens focuses the light (makes the light rays converge) to a certain distance from the flange, so if the sensor is moved closer or farther away from it, the whole image would be out of focus.
I did not see a option to move along the optical axis. Just X, Y, and rotation. No Z axis.
 

Mt Spokane Photography

I post too Much on Here!!
Mar 25, 2011
15,544
768
Some are simply filed to block an idea from being used by another company, I think.
Patents are used to protect a inventions. You cannot patent a idea.

You pay inventors to develop their idea into a workable product, build models, and write a detailed description of how it works and what features make it unique.

In my company, I was the person who reviewed inventions in my engineering field and made monthly presentations to the patent committee. Its very expensive to proceed with a patent, so I had to include answers to several questions.

1. Is the invention practical? That is, would it really be useful to anyone.

2. Is the invention valuable to the company?

3. Will the company use it now or in the future.

And, I had options for recommendations.

1. Approve and proceed with development and submission of the patent ($$$$).

2. Send back to the inventor for further development, it sounds useful but is not complete.

3. Reject with reason, it could be a workable patent that the company would not benefit from, in which case, I could and often did recommend giving full rights to the inventor so he owned the invention.

I remember one patent that was software so I was not involved, it came with a company we merged with. It was a windowing method for dealing with Y2K in existing software that let you use a date that had just 2 digits (54 for 1954). The patent was deemed as not valuable to the company, so rights were given to the inventor. It turned out to be very valuable and was widely used.


That was the year I retired, so I never followed up on the end result of the patent review.
 
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CanonFanBoy

EOS 5D SR
Jan 28, 2015
4,152
1,712
Irving, Texas
Patents are used to protect a inventions. You cannot patent a idea.

You pay inventors to develop their idea into a workable product, build models, and write a detailed description of how it works and what features make it unique.

In my company, I was the person who reviewed inventions in my engineering field and made monthly presentations to the patent committee. Its very expensive to proceed with a patent, so I had to include answers to several questions.

1. Is the invention practical? That is, would it really be useful to anyone.

2. Is the invention valuable to the company?

3. Will the company use it now or in the future.

And, I had options for recommendations.

1. Approve and proceed with development and submission of the patent ($$$$).

2. Send back to the inventor for further development, it sounds useful but is not complete.

3. Reject with reason, it could be a workable patent that the company would not benefit from, in which case, I could and often did recommend giving full rights to the inventor so he owned the invention.

I remember one patent that was software so I was not involved, it came with a company we merged with. It was a windowing method for dealing with Y2K in existing software that let you use a date that had just 2 digits (54 for 1954). The patent was deemed as not valuable to the company, so rights were given to the inventor. It turned out to be very valuable and was widely used.


That was the year I retired, so I never followed up on the end result of the patent review.
I know I said "idea", but more in a generic sense. What I really meant is a particular design... such as an aparatus or lens formula. That said, I could still be very wrong. I have never patented anything, but have owned patent leather shoes. ;)
 

Antono Refa

EOS 6D MK II
Mar 26, 2014
864
135
Or in focus if the photographer is hand holding a camera and sways forward or backwards, or if the subject is moving.
If the camera (including lens & sensor) move along the optical axis, the lens would be focused on something closer / farther. Moving the sensor would take the whole image out of focus, similar to the lens mount ring being misaligned.

One could let the lens autofocus compensate for that, but the framing & perspective would change slightly. A PowerShot, which has powered zoom, could compensate, but a MILC / DSLR could not.
 

Joules

EOS RP
Jul 16, 2017
368
287
Hamburg, Germany
if the sensor is moved closer or farther away from it, the whole image would be out of focus.
So it makes a lot of sense to compensate for the camera moving in that axis to avoid such blur. At least in applications were DoF is so shallow that it actually matters.
If the camera (including lens & sensor) move along the optical axis, the lens would be focused on something closer / farther. Moving the sensor would take the whole image out of focus, similar to the lens mount ring being misaligned.
Nope, moving the sensor back and forth just changes focus, essentially. It's how extension tubes work.

So if the sensor could move along the optical axis it could compensate for some small movements of the camera. I guess for applications with miniscule DoF or focus stacking this could be useful.
 
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