Ricoh predicts DSLRs will bounce back

3kramd5

EOS 5D MK IV
Mar 2, 2012
2,917
292
It is a fact. If you have ever use a Leica rangefinder film camera. you will understand
So a 49mm lens will focus better than a 50mm lens?

I have used rangefinders. Doesn’t help me understand the relationship between focal lengths less than 50mm and focus as compared to SLR.
 

Rocky

EOS 6D MK II
Jul 30, 2010
906
23
SLR focusing is based on the depth of field of the lens. Short focal length lens and slow lens have large depth of field . Therefore it is hard to set the exact distance. But you can set it to be close enough easily. Range finder uses two separate light path from the camera and triangulate at the subject to determine distance. This system is independent of the focal length of the lens or speed of the lens.
 

Rocky

EOS 6D MK II
Jul 30, 2010
906
23
I know how they work. I'm hung up on the threshold you gave.
I do not post any threshold. I just quote an example. A good film rangefinder is guaranteed to be accurate to 135 f4. The same system will be very accurate for 50mm or shorter. In fact I have used the system down to 50 f0.95 and still accurate
 

Rocky

EOS 6D MK II
Jul 30, 2010
906
23
Up to which magnification?
Pleased read up on depth of field before asking any question. Also read up on rangefinder camera. I have already answer all you concern. I can spend my time on something better. I do not want to waste anymore time
 

Kit.

EOS 6D MK II
Apr 25, 2011
864
354
Pleased read up on depth of field before asking any question.
Please you read up on depth of field (and how it relates to magnification in particular) before posting garbage.

Also please think why Leica insists on using Live View mode with macro adapter.
 
Reactions: Michael Clark

Rocky

EOS 6D MK II
Jul 30, 2010
906
23
Please you read up on depth of field (and how it relates to magnification in particular) before posting garbage.

Also please think why Leica insists on using Live View mode with macro adapter.
You are the one that has been posting wrong information and garbage.you start out with film range finder. Then changing the argument to something else . And keep changing subject of discussion . If you know so much about depth of field, you should not even ask about magnification. Speaking of garbage, there is no live view in Leica film camera. They do have a complicated ground glass viewing system and Visoflex for extreme close up or long telephoto.
You just cannot tell the summer insect about snow.
 

Kit.

EOS 6D MK II
Apr 25, 2011
864
354
You are the one that has been posting wrong information and garbage.you start out with film range finder. Then changing the argument to something else . And keep changing subject of discussion . If you know so much about depth of field, you should not even ask about magnification. Speaking of garbage, there is no live view in Leica film camera. They do have a complicated ground glass viewing system and Visoflex for extreme close up or long telephoto.
You just cannot tell the summer insect about snow.
So, I just cannot tell you about the relation between depth of field and magnification?
 
Reactions: Michael Clark

Michael Clark

Now we see through a glass, darkly...
Apr 5, 2016
573
241
I was there when we went from rangefinders to DSLR's. The really big driver was being able to see your composition and not having to deal with parallax. It opened the door for camera owners to have multiple lenses and still get great compositions. Rangefinders were very quickly moved to the back burner.

I see mirrorless the same way. Being able to see even more accurately exactly what you are photographing is a big driver, and the fast and accurate autofocus is equally or even bigger.

The change will not be as fast because its not such a huge difference, but it will happen for sure. The technology is difficult, but expect to see some of the issues solved soon. Canon already has a patent that should eliminate the freezing of the viewfinder as a image is saved, we may even see that in the pro level cameras coming up.

Except that while AF is more accurate with top of the line mirrorless cameras than PDAF is with DSLRs, it's still not as fast as PDAF in top of the line DSLRs, particularly when using predictive AF to track moving subjects at high frame rates. Any DSLR can also get the same AF advantage of imaging sensor based AF that mirrorless cameras enjoy by simply locking up the mirror and shooting in Live View.
 

Rocky

EOS 6D MK II
Jul 30, 2010
906
23
So, I just cannot tell you about the relation between depth of field and magnification?
You cannot tell me , because you do not know. So far you have not explain anything to me. You just keep on posting unrelated question
 

Michael Clark

Now we see through a glass, darkly...
Apr 5, 2016
573
241
Its not a assumption, a DSLR has a built in error with autofocus. It can be adjusted to autofocus accurately at specific distances or with specific lenses, but a ordinary consumer DSLR like a SL-3 can't be adjusted to match lenses at all. A mirrorless focuses with consistent accuracy at all distances with virtually all brands of lenses. This is a huge advantage for most DSLR users who do not have the minimal adjustments in a high end model.

If you don't believe in WYSIWYG, you are denying the basic reason why SLR's pushed rangefinders out of the market in the late 1950's. Nothing wrong with rangefinders if you learn to compensate for attached lens and the distance, it just makes using the camera easier to have TTL viewing.
But even the lowly SL-3 can be put in Live View and have accurate AF based on the imaging sensor instead of the PDAF sensor. WIth a DSLR one has a choice which type of AF to use based on the shooting scenario.
 

Michael Clark

Now we see through a glass, darkly...
Apr 5, 2016
573
241
You cannot tell me , because you do not know. So far you have not explain anything to me. You just keep on posting unrelated question
News flash - DoF is dependent upon only two things: aperture and magnification.

Magnification is affected by the following:

Subject distance
Focal length of the lens
Enlargement ratio from the size of the image projected onto the sensor to the size of the image as displayed when viewed
The distance between the image and the viewer

If you take the exact same image, display it at both 8x10 and 16x20, and view both from the same distance the larger display size will have narrower DoF than the smaller display size. Why? Because as one enlarges an image one enlarges all of the blur in that image. Viewed at the same distance, the viewer's eye can discriminate blur more easily in the larger display size.

Or if you take the same exact display size and view it at different distances the DoF will change. As one gets further away from the image, the apparent DoF will increase as it takes a larger and larger blur radius to be perceived as blur instead of a point.