Ricoh predicts DSLRs will bounce back

Jul 12, 2011
375
8
Today there is no compelling reason to go mirrorless. Any weight advantage from removing the mirror seems to be negated by heavy lenses. Lack of lens choice currently hurts Canon and Nikon - some what Sony also. Micro 4/3 is small but has technology disadvantages long term. New "medium" format offerings are slow to sell and limited lens choice. Sensor technology is about to take another jump - commonplace 50mp, 65,90 and 100 mp sensors are becoming available and the biggest drawback is a processor (or processors) to handle the data rates. Smart phones have effectively killed smaller cameras and satisfy the photo needs of a majority in terms of convenience and image quality. Declining market will make R&D expenses harder to comeby for even today's profitable camera manufacturers. Look for fallout from even today's "premier" manufacturers and you may find a market with Canon, Sony, Fuji and Panasonic as the only reasonable players,
 

Pape

EOS 7D MK II
Dec 31, 2018
433
267
Hey mirrorless lenses arent heavy cause they are mirrorless ,they are heavy cause sensor getting sharper and lenses need to be too.
lenses 2cm more front wont change weight much.
I guess they could make like leica ,shape 6 lens tube with extreme precision and put 10k label. then you would tell mirrorless is crazy expensive :p
 
Last edited:

Michael Clark

Now we see through a glass, darkly...
Apr 5, 2016
1,139
569
Today there is no compelling reason to go mirrorless. Any weight advantage from removing the mirror seems to be negated by heavy lenses. Lack of lens choice currently hurts Canon and Nikon - some what Sony also. Micro 4/3 is small but has technology disadvantages long term. New "medium" format offerings are slow to sell and limited lens choice. Sensor technology is about to take another jump - commonplace 50mp, 65,90 and 100 mp sensors are becoming available and the biggest drawback is a processor (or processors) to handle the data rates. Smart phones have effectively killed smaller cameras and satisfy the photo needs of a majority in terms of convenience and image quality. Declining market will make R&D expenses harder to comeby for even today's profitable camera manufacturers. Look for fallout from even today's "premier" manufacturers and you may find a market with Canon, Sony, Fuji and Panasonic as the only reasonable players,
I would not be surprised if eventually Fuji wound up owning Panasonic's ILC business.
 

Michael Clark

Now we see through a glass, darkly...
Apr 5, 2016
1,139
569
circle of confusion is then aperture or magnification?
The acceptable circle of confusion for a particular use case is determined by the magnification involved in that use case that occurs between the image projected by the lens onto the imaging plane and the final display size viewed from the final viewing distance by a person with an assumed acuity of vision.

That is, the circle of confusion is an expression of how large a blur circle projected onto the imaging plane (sensor or film) can be and still be perceived as a single point by a viewer of the final image after enlargement to the display size when viewed from the intended viewing distance.

The diameter of the blur circle is defined as a linear measurement on the imaging plane, but how large that linear measurement may be (and thus the maximum acceptable size of the blur circle projected onto the imaging plane that we define as the circle of confusion) is determined by the corresponding angular size of such a blur circle when enlarged in the final display size and viewed by a person with a defined visual acuity at the final viewing distance that will still allow that blur circle to be perceived by that viewer as a point.
 
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