Show your Bird Portraits

jmeyer

http://www.jmeyerphotography.net/
Dec 11, 2014
64
11
39
Wisconsin
www.jmeyerphotography.net
Thanks Click! Do not worry - nobody can ID it with 100% confidence right now. It"s why we are waiting for it's full transition to the new plumage.
I asked several people here, in Wisconsin, and based on your photos, they said American because the photo has a good shot of the tail and long primary projections, with at least 4 primary tips visible. A Pacific would only show 3 primary tips. Pass this info along in case others are missing it. Would this be a first sighting for Hawaii? Keep posting updates please or at least message me. Thank you.

Jeremy
 
Aug 16, 2012
4,241
464
Jack, Life isn't fair! Just by fluke I have arrived in bird migration week and am being collected at 5am tomorrow morning to go to a good spot. Had I known, I would have brought my best Canon gear rather than the bridge camera, although it is great for closer up in better light.

Got this spotted flycatcher this evening, at dusk and backlit.
DSC04051-DxO_spottedflycatcherSH.jpg
 
Aug 16, 2012
4,241
464
Backlighting never helps, you need the reflections off the feathers to give good contrast and the DO II isn't at its best against the light. Never mind, it's nice to see the pileated ones in action.
 

ISv

"The equipment that matters, is you"
Apr 30, 2017
541
185
I asked several people here, in Wisconsin, and based on your photos, they said American because the photo has a good shot of the tail and long primary projections, with at least 4 primary tips visible. A Pacific would only show 3 primary tips. Pass this info along in case others are missing it. Would this be a first sighting for Hawaii? Keep posting updates please or at least message me. Thank you.

Jeremy
Hi Jeremy!
Not only the primaries are 4 protruding behind the tip of the tail. They also are way to much behind the tip - in the Pacific they go less than 1/2 bill lenght behind the tip, in the American they are more than 1/2 the length of the bill. Tertials of the Pacific are much longer and reach the outer 1/3 of the tail, in the American they are reaching just the base of the tail. All these are "check" in the bird on my photos. Only the markings on the back of the bird agree better with the Pacific.
The problem: the tercials as well as the rectices (the flying feathers of the tail) are very worn in my bird, changing the ratios... We can NOT put new species of migratory bird in the list for Hawaii if we are not 100% confident in the ID! So, what we can do now is to wait for the bird to finish it's transition to non-breeding plumage and all the feathers are fresh. Fortunatelly the golden plovers are teritorial and they in generally stay in restricted perimeter in the summer (on other hand it's very populous park with a lot of walking dogs so, we will see...).
Yes, I will inform you when we get to definite conclusion! And off course I want to take a photo of the bird when it looks better:)!
 
We've had some really drab mornings in SoCal this year so sunrise light shots have just been hard to get along the coast. Sunday, after sitting in the mud and getting blase shots of our local tricolor, kingfishers, etc, I decided to go wander around a local 'island'. After some rain(SoCal rain known elsewhere as drizzle), I managed to get some closeup shots of this female American Kestrel with the gray clouds behind her just as the sun broke through for a few minutes.

1DX MK II 600 f/4L IS II w/1.4X III 1/1600 : f/11 : ISO 1000