Show your Bird Portraits

Apr 29, 2013
341
2
Likes: Jack Douglas
Here is a warbler from way back that I couldn't ID (Alberta) and finally I see no other possibility. There seem to be so many regional variations.

Jack


So now I'm wondering about this one being a Palm war View attachment 182018 bler as well??

Jack
Here is a warbler from way back that I couldn't ID (Alberta) and finally I see no other possibility. There seem to be so many regional variations.

Jack


So now I'm wondering about this one being a Palm war View attachment 182018 bler as well??

Jack
There is app called Merlin by The Cornell Lab. Pretty accurate with the IDs. I use it and may be a worth a try!
 
Likes: Jack Douglas

Jack Douglas

CR for the Humour
Apr 10, 2013
5,700
268
Alberta, Canada
Nice shot Jack, yes that is a Palm Warbler.Check out https://www.allaboutbirds.org they have a great site for Bird ID.
Thanks ArunP and jprusa. I do know about the site but sometimes I just fall back into old habits of grabbing a book. I've got a few warblers that are driving me nuts but I guess I'm not alone - seems they are just more challenging than many birds.

It's dawned on me that when it comes to difficult ID a person should just fire away rather than be waiting for the "nice" pose since the different angles can be quite helpful. The downside is later culling many shots. Am I alone in this regard - culling shots still from 2013!?
 
Likes: jprusa

ISv

"The equipment that matters, is you"
Apr 30, 2017
578
246
It's dawned on me that when it comes to difficult ID a person should just fire away rather than be waiting for the "nice" pose since the different angles can be quite helpful. The downside is later culling many shots. Am I alone in this regard - culling shots still from 2013!?
No, you are not alone in this regard Jack:D! With rare or questionable birds I first shoot, later ask. And if I have a time I even look for composition:). It results always in a lot of crap photos (but rather good for ID!)! Good to remember: it always helps to know what you are looking for, what are the most important features for ID in that particular group of birds.

Alan, Jack and Jeremy - very nice shots guys! Congratulations Jeremy - I hope you are happy with the new bird in your collection (and great shots BTW)!
 

jmeyer

http://www.jmeyerphotography.net/
Dec 11, 2014
69
44
39
Wisconsin
www.jmeyerphotography.net
Thanks ArunP and jprusa. I do know about the site but sometimes I just fall back into old habits of grabbing a book. I've got a few warblers that are driving me nuts but I guess I'm not alone - seems they are just more challenging than many birds.

It's dawned on me that when it comes to difficult ID a person should just fire away rather than be waiting for the "nice" pose since the different angles can be quite helpful. The downside is later culling many shots. Am I alone in this regard - culling shots still from 2013!?
Fall warblers are some of the hardest birds to ID. There is so much variance from first year birds to adults, that it confuses a lot of very knowledgeable birders. If you ever have ID questions about warblers, feel free to PM me and I will help you out.
 

jmeyer

http://www.jmeyerphotography.net/
Dec 11, 2014
69
44
39
Wisconsin
www.jmeyerphotography.net
No, you are not alone in this regard Jack:D! With rare or questionable birds I first shoot, later ask. And if I have a time I even look for composition:). It results always in a lot of crap photos (but rather good for ID!)! Good to remember: it always helps to know what you are looking for, what are the most important features for ID in that particular group of birds.

Alan, Jack and Jeremy - very nice shots guys! Congratulations Jeremy - I hope you are happy with the new bird in your collection (and great shots BTW)!
Thank you! I'm extremely happy with the photos I obtained and was able to watch it for about 50 minutes, in its habit.
 
Likes: ISv
Aug 16, 2012
4,430
662
Nice selfie Alan. ;) Here's a wild turkey posing in the "meadow" behind our house. Sometimes ugly can look kinda cool. I was able to take a bunch of photos without him moving much. I was lucky enough to catch his nictitating membrane, third eyelid, in different stages of deployment.
The series works well indeed. Usually, the membrane spoils mine!
 
Likes: AaronT