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Cog

EOS 7D MK II
Dec 6, 2013
492
124
I don't think it's Dunlin. Not Sanderling or Semipalmated sandpiper too (the forth thumb is clearly visible - Sanderlings are missing that one. In the Semipalmated we have to see some connection between the thumbs, I don't see it ...). I will try to ID it when I get home but since it looks like one of the "pips" I may fail - these are notoriously difficult... It may help somewhat if you tell us where you took that photo. Nice shot anyway!
Thank you, ISv! Most of my current bird photos, including this one, are taken in Qatar, where I'm based now. These birds are here all year round
 

ISv

"The equipment that matters, is you"
Apr 30, 2017
638
374
:cry:! - I was already sure in the rightness of your identification - Dunlin! But "all year round" ?!!!!
Well: I'm temporary with very bad monitor at my work and when I was watching your photos they appeared so gray for Dunlin. Also the bill is kind of short in comparison with the Dunlins I have seen here (Hawaii). My first guest was Western sandpiper (long bill, grayish back but disturbing brest - to much dark there) and it was the reason to suspect "peep" (the smallest birds in genus Calidris).
At home on my monitor the colors matched Dunlin (there is no way to judge the size of the bird on your photos - could you, please, put a ruler next to the bird in the future photos:ROFLMAO:;)). The only problem left was that shortish bill. I haven't seen Dunlin in Europe and checking the variations of different subspecies I found that, indeed, there are at least two European races that could be shorter in the bill. And both of them are eventually wintering in your area... The Western is not migrating to your parts of the World and has different colors (and size off course) - NOTE, all the time I'm speeking about NONbreading plumage! Another suspect was the Broad-billed sandpiper but it always has double, supercilium (the light streaks above the eye).
But "all year round"? I have no idea what kind of Calidris (and it's definitelly from genus Calidris for me) you can see there (Qatar) all the year. If you have older photos, please, check the timing...
 

Cog

EOS 7D MK II
Dec 6, 2013
492
124
:cry:! - I was already sure in the rightness of your identification - Dunlin! But "all year round" ?!!!!
Well: I'm temporary with very bad monitor at my work and when I was watching your photos they appeared so gray for Dunlin. Also the bill is kind of short in comparison with the Dunlins I have seen here (Hawaii). My first guest was Western sandpiper (long bill, grayish back but disturbing brest - to much dark there) and it was the reason to suspect "peep" (the smallest birds in genus Calidris).
At home on my monitor the colors matched Dunlin (there is no way to judge the size of the bird on your photos - could you, please, put a ruler next to the bird in the future photos:ROFLMAO:;)). The only problem left was that shortish bill. I haven't seen Dunlin in Europe and checking the variations of different subspecies I found that, indeed, there are at least two European races that could be shorter in the bill. And both of them are eventually wintering in your area... The Western is not migrating to your parts of the World and has different colors (and size off course) - NOTE, all the time I'm speeking about NONbreading plumage! Another suspect was the Broad-billed sandpiper but it always has double, supercilium (the light streaks above the eye).
But "all year round"? I have no idea what kind of Calidris (and it's definitelly from genus Calidris for me) you can see there (Qatar) all the year. If you have older photos, please, check the timing...
Thanks a lot for your research, ISv! Well, my words "all year round" should be treated with caution because 1) I mostly see them from fall to spring and I have no clue what happens in the summer because I basically don't go out at this time due to scorching heat; 2) I might as well mistake this bird for a few similar sandpipers or plovers. They always hang out on the beach together. My second best match is Curlew Sandpiper (Calidris ferruginea), mostly because of the shape of the beak and absebce of dark stripes on the head.
 

ISv

"The equipment that matters, is you"
Apr 30, 2017
638
374
In the summer they go North for breading. Some sick or injured birds may over-summer on the winter grounds (I have seen this here with the Golden plovers) but they are very restricted numbers.
Curlew sandpiper has even longer bill than Dunlin and in winter (non breading) plumage is paler (grayish) on the back. Longer legs than the bird on the photos.
Cheers!
 
Reactions: Cog

ISv

"The equipment that matters, is you"
Apr 30, 2017
638
374
Alan, we have the Northern mocking bird here (Your last picture) and I have seen it several times around but I still have to take photo of it...
Here it is kind of cold (local standards, and before Jack or other guys start laughing on me - it's just question of adaptation. Here when the temperatures are above 28-29C we start complaining " too hot", at 22-24C (in the day, shadow, strong winds) OMG - it's COLD! Right now it is for very long time (few weeks?) in the "low".
Even the birds are looking "strange" (honestly, I didn't know that the Red-vented Bulbul could be too much "plump - shaped":)!). I took these today after work, from my lanai. Looking at the forecast it seems I have not much chances to go out for the weekend: wind, rain and hmm - let say "cold"...
DSC_5449_DxO.jpg
DSC_5453_DxO.jpg
DSC_5464_DxO.jpg
 
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ISv

"The equipment that matters, is you"
Apr 30, 2017
638
374
A couple of small birds from there, common the other side of the pond, but not for us Brits.

View attachment 183151View attachment 183152
Alan, I love the photo of the Northern Mocingbird. No idea how did you crop it but if you give it some air in front - if there is a room for this off course (just to free it from the cage!)... And Yeah - that dry branch in front of the bird... I wish I know a program that be able to eliminate it (shades on the bird can stay)...
 

jmeyer

http://www.jmeyerphotography.net/
Dec 11, 2014
81
135
40
Wisconsin
www.jmeyerphotography.net
Today I went to Shamrock Nature Center in hopes of finally finding the Florida Scrub Jay. I got all the way to the water canal on the north end and found them on the other side. I also saw a Loggerhead Shrike on the other side as well! I decided to walk back to the car and drive all the way around and then walk 2.5 miles, one way to where they were. I'm glad I did, because I got great looks at both birds, and both were firsts for me. There ended up being 8 Scrub Jays, with a pair building a nest. I was lucky enough to feed acorns to a couple of them, right from my hand. He also flew up and landed on my head, very exciting!

Jeremy

Florida Scrub-Jay 100.jpg
Florida Scrub-Jay 101.jpg
Florida Scrub-Jay 102.jpg
Florida Scrub-Jay 104.jpg
Loggerhead Shrike 100.jpg
Loggerhead Shrike 101.jpg
Loggerhead Shrike 102.jpg
Loggerhead Shrike 103.jpg
 

ISv

"The equipment that matters, is you"
Apr 30, 2017
638
374
Very nice photos Jeremy!! Oh wait, you posted some more before my answer :LOL:. OK - they are equally good if not better...
Hey, could you stop running here and there, so I can answer your posts in time:D?!
 

AlanF

5DSR
Aug 16, 2012
4,666
1,171
Alan, I love the photo of the Northern Mocingbird. No idea how did you crop it but if you give it some air in front - if there is a room for this off course (just to free it from the cage!)... And Yeah - that dry branch in front of the bird... I wish I know a program that be able to eliminate it (shades on the bird can stay)...
It was cropped according to the rule of thirds, with the eye in the optimal position to draw attention to it against the blue light - it was meant to be a composition showing the bird surrounded by colours in a natural background, and I didn't want to lose the bird. I had taken several of mockingbirds in different locations in Florida against the sky last month , and used different approaches for composition.

Mockingbird_Rule_3.jpg
3Q7A3035-DxO_mockingbird_on_fence.jpg
3Q7A4023-DxO_mockingbird_560.jpg
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3Q7A5741-DxO_mockingbird.jpg


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Valvebounce

EOS 5D SR
Apr 3, 2013
4,045
74
52
Isle of Wight
Hi Jeremy.
Great story and experience behind the shots, and a great series of shots, I particularly like the 4th shot, the head and shoulders portrait. Excellent.

Cheers, Graham.

Today I went to Shamrock Nature Center in hopes of finally finding the Florida Scrub Jay. I got all the way to the water canal on the north end and found them on the other side. I also saw a Loggerhead Shrike on the other side as well! I decided to walk back to the car and drive all the way around and then walk 2.5 miles, one way to where they were. I'm glad I did, because I got great looks at both birds, and both were firsts for me. There ended up being 8 Scrub Jays, with a pair building a nest. I was lucky enough to feed acorns to a couple of them, right from my hand. He also flew up and landed on my head, very exciting!

Jeremy
 

AlanF

5DSR
Aug 16, 2012
4,666
1,171
Today I went to Shamrock Nature Center in hopes of finally finding the Florida Scrub Jay. I got all the way to the water canal on the north end and found them on the other side. I also saw a Loggerhead Shrike on the other side as well! I decided to walk back to the car and drive all the way around and then walk 2.5 miles, one way to where they were. I'm glad I did, because I got great looks at both birds, and both were firsts for me. There ended up being 8 Scrub Jays, with a pair building a nest. I was lucky enough to feed acorns to a couple of them, right from my hand. He also flew up and landed on my head, very exciting!

Jeremy
Beautiful shots Jeremy, well worth the effort. I didn't get a Scrub Jay and so it's great seeing some from you.
 
Reactions: ISv

jmeyer

http://www.jmeyerphotography.net/
Dec 11, 2014
81
135
40
Wisconsin
www.jmeyerphotography.net
Thanks guys! I'm taking the wife with me today to see the scrub jays. She was really disappointed when she didn't come me with yesterday, haha! Then we'll head up to Celery Fields and get the Roseati Spoonbills and anything else that's around.

Jeremy
 

briangus

EOS M50
Apr 6, 2017
32
31
Singapore
There are many reports of the EOS R performing well for birds, but there have been some negatives here and this negative review https://www.holgercremer.org/single-post/2018/10/15/Why-the-EOS-R-is-useless-for-Wildlife-Photography
If I get an R series, ti will be from a store that allows no quibble return so I can test it well.
Apologies for the late reply, been a bit busy of late.
I can concur with what he was experiencing with the 100-400 and the R in low light.
Was thinking at the time that the fabled firmware update might resolve the issue.
I updated firmware when it was released and managed a trip to Sungei today
Nothing much worth shooting today but the 100-400 was a lot more responsive when focusing.