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ISv

"The equipment that matters, is you"
Apr 30, 2017
831
907
That's a beauty. I haven't been that close to a Pec since I've had decent camera equipment. Here's hoping!
Yes, the bird is beauty! "Hoping" is not enough, you need a lot of patience and luck (I got that bird to ~14 meters only because the help of jelouse Wandering Tatler - it was chaising the Pectoral)!
Now I'm after the Sharp-tailed Sandpiper - it's time for them to arrive but also uncommon bird (except some years when they are slightly more - same as the Pectoral).
 

Noah

I'm New Here
Sep 17, 2019
13
37
U.K.
Yes, the bird is beauty! "Hoping" is not enough, you need a lot of patience and luck (I got that bird to ~14 meters only because the help of jelouse Wandering Tatler - it was chaising the Pectoral)!
Now I'm after the Sharp-tailed Sandpiper - it's time for them to arrive but also uncommon bird (except some years when they are slightly more - same as the Pectoral).
Of course, but I'll explain what I meant by 'hoping'. Pecs are regular but scarce migrants in the UK and news gets out quickly when one is found. Often fieldcraft is not possible where birders and photographers are present and anyone getting too close is publicly shamed for doing so, even if the bird is unconcerned.

I always use fieldcraft and patience as this shot of a Sanderling with a 7DII & 400L on Madeira a few years back shows.

Good luck with the Sharp-tailed.


Sanderling_filtered.jpg
 

AlanF

Canon 5DSR II
Aug 16, 2012
5,738
3,040
Thanks Graham, you know it's not an excellent shot but on other hand - gives a lot of room for more "watching the birds";)/luck/and well, even more luck!!! All this process is making me happy - it's my way to relax...
Luck favours the well-prepared mind, Louis Pasteur.
Luck favours the lucky person, AlanF
 
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Click

I post too Much on Here!!
Jul 29, 2012
12,496
1,032
Canada
Thank

Thanks Click but look at that background (and even the bird is not that sharp) and compare with yours GBH (BTW the Great Blue is even more rare visitor here than the Pectoral sandpiper)!!!
Whatever - thanks to everyone how put (y)under this photo. My revenge is one more photo of the same bird (what?! you guys were asking for that :p) and juvenile Hawaiian Coot in it's nest.
Hi ISv,

Don't be too hard on yourself. I really like your pictures. Keep posting my friend.

Another very nice series above. Well done.
 
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ISv

"The equipment that matters, is you"
Apr 30, 2017
831
907
Hi ISv,

Don't be too hard on yourself. I really like your pictures. Keep posting my friend.

Another very nice series above. Well done.
Thanks Click - especially for "my friend"!!! But don't try to spoil me :)!
 
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ISv

"The equipment that matters, is you"
Apr 30, 2017
831
907
Of course, but I'll explain what I meant by 'hoping'. Pecs are regular but scarce migrants in the UK and news gets out quickly when one is found. Often fieldcraft is not possible where birders and photographers are present and anyone getting too close is publicly shamed for doing so, even if the bird is unconcerned.

I always use fieldcraft and patience as this shot of a Sanderling with a 7DII & 400L on Madeira a few years back shows.

Good luck with the Sharp-tailed.


View attachment 186792
Last weekend the fieldcraft worked for me. Even too much: now I'm on medication for bee stung:confused:! Being stung more than several times in Europe I didn't know I'm allergic - should be something new or the local bees are somewhat different.
Here is a shot from the Spring of the last year when I succeeded to get close to this Ruddy Turnstone (actually small group of them) - without the danger of the fieldcraft :) .
DSC_5813_DxO-2.jpg
 

AlanF

Canon 5DSR II
Aug 16, 2012
5,738
3,040
Last weekend the fieldcraft worked for me. Even too much: now I'm on medication for bee stung:confused:! Being stung more than several times in Europe I didn't know I'm allergic - should be something new or the local bees are somewhat different.
Here is a shot from the Spring of the last year when I succeeded to get close to this Ruddy Turnstone (actually small group of them) - without the danger of the fieldcraft :) .View attachment 186821
Nice shot. I have never got that close either by luck or field craft.
 

Nat_WA

EOS 7D mk.II
Aug 15, 2017
682
288
Netherlands
One from the garden, a common bird here in the UK - Blue Tit.

View attachment 186786
Hi Noah, even common garden birds can be interesting when captured in a nice pose / composition :) !
Lots of detail while background is nicely blurred, light in the eye of the bird, nice weathered rough wood on which the bird is perched, but ... am I alone in thinking there is a significant magenta / purple cast over the bird? To me it seems white balance is off by quite a bit...
W.
 
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AlanF

Canon 5DSR II
Aug 16, 2012
5,738
3,040
Hi Noah, even common garden birds can be interesting when captured in a nice pose / composition :) !
Lots of detail while background is nicely blurred, light in the eye of the bird, nice weathered rough wood on which the bird is perched, but ... am I alone in thinking there is a significant magenta / purple cast over the bird? To me it seems white balance is off by quite a bit...
W.
It's a really nice sharp shot. I played around with the white balance and the colours are indeed more natural if the temperature of the white balance is increased.
 
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ISv

"The equipment that matters, is you"
Apr 30, 2017
831
907
It's a really nice sharp shot. I played around with the white balance and the colours are indeed more natural if the temperature of the white balance is increased.
Hi Alan, how do you play with the temperature of the JPEG in DxO PL?!
I couldn't. On other hand increasing the highlights or the exposure in the JPEG will reduce the magenta to minimum. Slight play with the mid-tones will reduce it (but I didn't play with this with this particular JPEG) even more. In generally when taking photos early morning or around sunset I'm getting more red in the pictures (absolutely normal, that's the real light at that time), mix it with the blue of the sky and = magenta (especially if you are making -EV correction to preserve the highlights).
When using (and I always do it) RAW files, and if I need the real colors (and what is the real color - it's not the same over the day, depend on the sky, depend on the shade - especially under trees) than I can adjust the color with the temperature - like in the case of this Sanderling - let say to +/- white, but it's not what my eyes see and most probably not what Noah has seen in that time of the day.
 

AlanF

Canon 5DSR II
Aug 16, 2012
5,738
3,040
Hi Alan, how do you play with the temperature of the JPEG in DxO PL?!
I couldn't. On other hand increasing the highlights or the exposure in the JPEG will reduce the magenta to minimum. Slight play with the mid-tones will reduce it (but I didn't play with this with this particular JPEG) even more. In generally when taking photos early morning or around sunset I'm getting more red in the pictures (absolutely normal, that's the real light at that time), mix it with the blue of the sky and = magenta (especially if you are making -EV correction to preserve the highlights).
When using (and I always do it) RAW files, and if I need the real colors (and what is the real color - it's not the same over the day, depend on the sky, depend on the shade - especially under trees) than I can adjust the color with the temperature - like in the case of this Sanderling - let say to +/- white, but it's not what my eyes see and most probably not what Noah has seen in that time of the day.
I download images and then open in Preview on the Mac to read the EXIFs. There is a temperature slider in Preview’s adjust colour.
 
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Noah

I'm New Here
Sep 17, 2019
13
37
U.K.
Hi Noah, even common garden birds can be interesting when captured in a nice pose / composition :) !
Lots of detail while background is nicely blurred, light in the eye of the bird, nice weathered rough wood on which the bird is perched, but ... am I alone in thinking there is a significant magenta / purple cast over the bird? To me it seems white balance is off by quite a bit...
W.
Thanks for your comments & critical eye, Nat. You're right, it does look off. It was a quick edit and upload of a shot I'd just taken. I'll take more care next time. :)
 

Noah

I'm New Here
Sep 17, 2019
13
37
U.K.
It's a really nice sharp shot. I played around with the white balance and the colours are indeed more natural if the temperature of the white balance is increased.
Thanks Alan, I've done the same now and it looks more natural. I imported the RAW file into Photos, cropped and exported as JPEG to upload. (Must do better next time!)

p.s. How is the 90D for birds in flight and spot focusing? The EOS R is still hopeless at BIF even with the new firmware so I'm looking at replacing my 7DII with one until Canon make a decent camera ;). It's cheaper than the other (unspoken) options as I have genuine batteries, lenses, extenders etc. that would cost a small fortune to replace.
 

AlanF

Canon 5DSR II
Aug 16, 2012
5,738
3,040
Thanks Alan, I've done the same now and it looks more natural. I imported the RAW file into Photos, cropped and exported as JPEG to upload. (Must do better next time!)

p.s. How is the 90D for birds in flight and spot focusing? The EOS R is still hopeless at BIF even with the new firmware so I'm looking at replacing my 7DII with one until Canon make a decent camera ;). It's cheaper than the other (unspoken) options as I have genuine batteries, lenses, extenders etc. that would cost a small fortune to replace.
I have done an extensive review https://www.canonrumors.com/forum/index.php?threads/eos-90d-hands-on-review.37589/ which is summed up in the last posting. In short, the spot focus is excellent: very fast and accurate, and at least as good as in the 5DIV, 5DSR and 7DII. For BIF, In I either use the centre 9 points, which are not quite as fast as the centre point alone but still very good at quickly locking on and then staying stuck when panning or for big slow birds just the centre point. Using all points works against a clear sky, however can be too slow but will track across much of the viewfinder.

It pairs beautifully with the 100-400mm II, and I am at this stage dropping using the 1.4xTCIII. The bare 90D +100-400mm II has better IQ and resolution on the 90D than the lens +1.4xTC on the 5DIV (and the R by analogy). I was very impressed with the sharpness of the bluetit shot, for which you used the 1.4xTC on the 100-400mm II. You do get an increase in resolution with the TC with the 90D, but you lose acutance.
 
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Cog

EOS 7D MK II
Dec 6, 2013
534
299
Qatar
I've started using Olympus e-m1 m II with a 300mm lens for bird photography more and more often recently. And when I travel in the summer, I often have only 40-150mm instead of 300mm. Light weight is a huge advantage if your trip is not meant to be about shooting wildlife. I'm not sure if it fits the Canon forum, but it may be interesting to compare the on-site field performance of the two systems.

So a few Oly samples from this summer. 40-150, mostly at 150mm, sometimes with a 1.4 extender.















And brown pelicans in flight: