Soft edge to all of my photos???

kat.hayes

EOS T7i
Nov 25, 2014
76
0
All of a sudden I am getting a soft edge to my photos taken with a 5DM3. This happens with both my 24-70 and my 70-200. What is going on? Look at the left side of this photo. If I shoot horizontally the soft edge appears along the bottom.

Thanks.
 

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kat.hayes

EOS T7i
Nov 25, 2014
76
0
I am using a studio light with a shutter of 1/250. Please pardon my ignorance, I am new to all of this. I have been using these settings for many shots I took yesterday while practicing with the light and I did not have this issue. Perhaps my settings were slightly different and I didn't realize it? What is the issue?

Thanks!
 
Aug 23, 2013
2,318
35
Bahia Brazil
Try repeating the photos using different shooter speeds, and see if it makes any difference.

Using 5D Mark III, the maximum flash sync speed is 1/250. If you use faster speed, there is a reason for a dark part in the photo with flash.
 

privatebydesign

Would you take advice from a cartoons stuffed toy?
Jan 29, 2011
7,728
816
119
kat.hayes said:
I am using a studio light with a shutter of 1/250. Please pardon my ignorance, I am new to all of this. I have been using these settings for many shots I took yesterday while practicing with the light and I did not have this issue. Perhaps my settings were slightly different and I didn't realize it? What is the issue?

Thanks!
No issue, your camera sync speed is not 1/250, try 1/160 and the shutter shadow will go away.
 

kat.hayes

EOS T7i
Nov 25, 2014
76
0
I just did some tests.

- The shadow appears at 1/250, much more pronounced at 1/320
- it seems to be gone at 1/200 (though I am only viewing on my viewfinder so I can't tell if there are any subtle remnant shadows there), at 1/160 it seems gone

1. Is this a universal regardless of camera guideline to keep the shutter slower than 1/250 or is it just with the 5DM3?
2. Does this also apply when shooting with a flash?
3. If using a studio light or a flash and not trying to get ambient light should I just always set the shutter at 1/200 or 1/160 and keep it there to avoid this? Is there a need to go slower than this?

Thanks so much, I thought I had some issue with my shutter!!!
 

privatebydesign

Would you take advice from a cartoons stuffed toy?
Jan 29, 2011
7,728
816
119
kat.hayes said:
I just did some tests.

- The shadow appears at 1/250, much more pronounced at 1/320
- it seems to be gone at 1/200 (though I am only viewing on my viewfinder so I can't tell if there are any subtle remnant shadows there), at 1/160 it seems gone

1. Is this a universal regardless of camera guideline to keep the shutter slower than 1/250 or is it just with the 5DM3?
2. Does this also apply when shooting with a flash?
3. If using a studio light or a flash and not trying to get ambient light should I just always set the shutter at 1/200 or 1/160 and keep it there to avoid this? Is there a need to go slower than this?

Thanks so much, I thought I had some issue with my shutter!!!
1/ All cameras have a sin speed after which the shadow will appear, the 1 series have a 1/250 sync speed, the 5D MkIII I thought was 1/200 but if the lights are 'slow' you can get the shadow slower, some cameras the sync speed is even lower, back in the day of magnesium bulbs 1/60 was standard!
2/ If the flash doesn't have a higher sync mode, HSS or HS or some variant, yes. Higher speeds are only achievable with flashes that trick the system in some way.
3/ yes normally I take a dark image in the beginning, ie no lights just the ambient to check how much, if at all, the ambient is contributing to the image. You can use ND filters to darken the ambient if you need slower shutter speeds, but you will need high flash power settings.
 

Mt Spokane Photography

I post too Much on Here!!
Mar 25, 2011
15,424
675
kat.hayes said:
I am using a studio light with a shutter of 1/250. Please pardon my ignorance, I am new to all of this. I have been using these settings for many shots I took yesterday while practicing with the light and I did not have this issue. Perhaps my settings were slightly different and I didn't realize it? What is the issue?

Thanks!
I've pasted in the specification for the 5D MK III below. The X-Sync of 1/200 means that a faster shutter speed may not be synchronized with your flash. There is some variability in lights and the timing of their flash, so to be safe, 1/160 max unless you really need 1/200.


Type Vertical-travel, mechanical, focal-plane shutter with all speeds electronically-controlled

Shutter Speeds 1/8000 to 30 sec., bulb (Total shutter speed range. Available range varies by shooting mode.)
X-sync at 1/200 sec.

Shutter Release Soft-touch electromagnetic release

Self Timer
10-sec. or 2-sec. delay

Shutter Lag Time
1) During SW-1 ON, time lag between SW-2 ON and start of exposure:
- Approx. 0.059 sec. (With the shutter-release time lag is shortened with the Custom Function, it will be approx. 0.036 sec.)
2) Time lag between simultaneous SW-1/SW-2 ON and start of exposure: Approx. 0.2 sec.
- Time lag with the aperture stopped down by 3 stops or less. Excludes AF operation time.
 

old-pr-pix

EOS RP
Dec 26, 2011
371
21
Focal plane shutters like on the 5D3 have two curtains. The first curtain moves (i.e. opens) to expose the sensor to light from the lens. The second curtain then closes to block light from reaching the lens. At moderate shutter speeds there is a time when the entire sensor is exposed. You want the flash to fire when the whole sensor is exposed otherwise you get some type of shadow from one of the shutter curtains. At high shutter speeds the 2nd curtain chases the 1st very closely so only a slit is open at any instant. The X-sync speed is the fastest shutter speed for which the entire sensor surface is uncovered long enough for the flash to fire and expose the whole sensor at once. Using the rated X-sync speed requires the flash to be ready to fire the instant the camera signals it to flash. A slightly slower shutter speed just allows a little margin to compensate for flash response delays.

At much slower shutter speeds some cameras provide the option to sync the flash off the 1st curtain (normal operation) or to fire the flash just before the 2nd curtain begins to close. If the image includes moving light sources (like car headlights or tail lights) the effect of 1st curtain vs. 2nd curtain can be quite different.
 

symmar22

EOS 80D
Jun 19, 2013
126
7
Yep, as everyone said that is the very basics of flash photography. Focal plane shutters have a maximum synchronization speed (contrary to central shutters that can use all available speeds). So with the 5D series you are limited to 1/200th of a second (which by the way is a bit primitive considering Nikon could synchronize it's FE2 with 1/250th in 1983). However, if you use studio flashes, especially triggered by radio, I would limit my speed to 1/160th or lower. I personally limit myself to 1/125th when working in this configuration.
 

ahsanford

Particular Member
Aug 16, 2012
7,970
502
privatebydesign said:
kat.hayes said:
I am using a studio light with a shutter of 1/250. Please pardon my ignorance, I am new to all of this. I have been using these settings for many shots I took yesterday while practicing with the light and I did not have this issue. Perhaps my settings were slightly different and I didn't realize it? What is the issue?

Thanks!
No issue, your camera sync speed is not 1/250, try 1/160 and the shutter shadow will go away.
Surely this. Shoot faster than sync (without HSS engaged) and this will happen.

See 1/200s vs. 1/250s example here:
https://digital-photography-school.com/understand-flash-sync-speed-so-you-dont-sink-your-photo-shoot/

(This article is off on the specifics: all Canons are not remotely 1/200 sync! Check your manual or TDP)

- A