The follow-up to the Canon EOS-1D X Mark II may come in 2019 [CR2]

melgross

EOS RP
Nov 2, 2016
307
108
iPhones are <$1,000 fashion items, just like clothes. High end cameras are >$2,000 work tools. Therefore, no - not alike.
Fashion items that major motion picture producers are using for movie releases, and that some Tv shows have incorporated into their regular production. In addition I’m seeing fashion shoots and even some product photography being done with these.
 

melgross

EOS RP
Nov 2, 2016
307
108
No pro golf is very serious and very quiet, photographers have to be silent especially on the back swing which is when many of the most dynamic images are taken. Having a silent shutter allows you to use a wide angle lens rather than a telephoto to get a much more dynamic image. It was the silent shooting for golf that was the biggie. I've shot some pro-am stuff and even then they take noise from photographers or spectators very seriously.

Pro tennis is more about the fps as they are not as touchy about camera shutters, but it doesn't hurt...
I doubt if anyone cares about shutter slap on the golf course. You’re standing at least a couple of dozen feet away, at the closest. You’re outdoors too.

It’s interesting that it’s mainly the USA and Canada that’s concerned about noise on the golf course. Go to Asia, for example, and people are screaming while the swing is in progress.
 

Jack Douglas

CR for the Humour
Apr 10, 2013
5,982
805
Alberta, Canada
Tron, thanks for the complement. The reality is that anyone who is persistent can get what I do because other than having reasonable understanding of camera controls they are just plan, wait and shoot or even just a lucky break (talking mainly wildlife here). Hopefully, this true comment is an encouragement to those who are tempted to dive in as I did a few years ago. It is of course important to investigate the basics of composition as suggested to me by others on CR such as PBD. CR is great for motivation and ideas and GAS.:)

Those who have bad mouthed CR on occasion are off track as far as I'm concerned and probably too thin skinned... or don't have a sense of humour.;)

Jack
 
Reactions: CanonFanBoy

privatebydesign

Would you take advice from a cartoons stuffed toy?
Jan 29, 2011
7,407
428
119
I doubt if anyone cares about shutter slap on the golf course. You’re standing at least a couple of dozen feet away, at the closest. You’re outdoors too.

It’s interesting that it’s mainly the USA and Canada that’s concerned about noise on the golf course. Go to Asia, for example, and people are screaming while the swing is in progress.
I don't shoot golf professionally, but I know a couple who do at the highest level, their main reason for swapping from a full professional Canon kit to Sony was the A9's silent shutter. What else do you want me to say? They are liars, they swapped because DPR told them to?

Get a grip everybody, Canon is not the answer to every shooters question, neither is Nikon or Sony. I know a couple of high end sports pros who swapped, so what? Sony and Nikon have features Canon don't and some shooters prioritize those features over ones Canon has.
 

tpatana

EOS 6D MK II
Nov 1, 2012
1,224
15
Professional sports photographers generally knows how to time the photos well enough to be just fine without 20 FPS.
I actually challenged myself a couple of years ago with shooting soccer in "single action mode":
And had more keepers than i use to do otherwise.
/Daniel.
Interesting comments. I liked most of your text, although for my sports shooting it's difficult to say what fps would be optimal.

I shoot Japanese sword fighting a.k.a. kendo. The fighters try to make their attacks surprises to the opponent, so that means I also need to figure out when they might attack or they might surprise me too. I can't just hold down shutter for the whole match or my card would be full in no time. Also the actual contact (which makes usually for best picture) is very short duration. I think if I waited when I know they attack, and use single shot trying to capture the contact, I would almost never get it.

Instead, usually I keep tracking the players with half-press, and when I feel they might attack I already press down, hoping they actually do attack. Otherwise I'm never early enough to capture the contact. Especially on higher level where people are crazy fast. Then the fps count helps "getting lucky" by capturing the actual contact. I'd say roughly 10% of all attacks I shoot I get the contact timing correctly. (shooting with 1DX 12fps, around 1/400).

So for me higher FPS would help "getting lucky" with the strike, but naturally it would add more culling too. Sometimes I toy with the idea of shooting video and capturing the frames. If I could shoot 1080p240 with shutter at 1/480, that would be interesting experiment.

One from recent competition:


One of my best shots at the world championships:


He's so blazingly fast I don't think without the method I mention above, I could have caught the strike.

If there was camera that had variable fps setting (with high enough limit), I'd probably be using around 16-20fps for my shooting. I'm really curious to see what the 1DX3 can do.

Also here's example of "video" I made from 1DX frames (not sure how to insert here, so post link instead (link seems to work... interesting...)):
 

GoldWing

Canon EOS 1DXMKII
Oct 19, 2013
63
37
Los Angeles, CA
en.wikipedia.org
Interesting comments. I liked most of your text, although for my sports shooting it's difficult to say what fps would be optimal.

I shoot Japanese sword fighting a.k.a. kendo. The fighters try to make their attacks surprises to the opponent, so that means I also need to figure out when they might attack or they might surprise me too. I can't just hold down shutter for the whole match or my card would be full in no time. Also the actual contact (which makes usually for best picture) is very short duration. I think if I waited when I know they attack, and use single shot trying to capture the contact, I would almost never get it.

Instead, usually I keep tracking the players with half-press, and when I feel they might attack I already press down, hoping they actually do attack. Otherwise I'm never early enough to capture the contact. Especially on higher level where people are crazy fast. Then the fps count helps "getting lucky" by capturing the actual contact. I'd say roughly 10% of all attacks I shoot I get the contact timing correctly. (shooting with 1DX 12fps, around 1/400).

So for me higher FPS would help "getting lucky" with the strike, but naturally it would add more culling too. Sometimes I toy with the idea of shooting video and capturing the frames. If I could shoot 1080p240 with shutter at 1/480, that would be interesting experiment.

One from recent competition:


One of my best shots at the world championships:


He's so blazingly fast I don't think without the method I mention above, I could have caught the strike.

If there was camera that had variable fps setting (with high enough limit), I'd probably be using around 16-20fps for my shooting. I'm really curious to see what the 1DX3 can do.

Also here's example of "video" I made from 1DX frames (not sure how to insert here, so post link instead (link seems to work... interesting...)):
Great stuff! Amazed you're getting this at 1/400. Nice work!
 

tpatana

EOS 6D MK II
Nov 1, 2012
1,224
15
Great stuff! Amazed you're getting this at 1/400. Nice work!
Thanks. Most places are too dim to go any faster than that. 99% shooting with 70-200 @ 2.8 and ISO6400. I recently bought Sigma 85/1.4, so I might use that on second body. Probably shooting @ F2.0 to give bit more depth, so then I can relax ISO by one stop or go one stop faster shutter. At Tokyo world champs they increased lights for semi-finals and finals by about 1 stop. This summer in Korea it was ~0.5 stops brighter than usually. Most gyms it's 1/400 F2.8 ISO6400 all day.
 

scottkinfw

Wildlife photography is my passion
Sony says a successor to the A9 is coming. Look out! Canon is certainly facing a lot of pressure from Sony and Nikon.
As I read these posts, I wonder why so many people feel pressured to make a purchase right now? Is this GAS, or a real need?

I am fascinated by the new R but it isn't quite what I would like to own for a few years (maybe the next iteration), and certainly, the lenses will be a huge investment.

All told, though I really WANT the new system, I don't NEED it, so I don't fee the same urgency. I am not a professional, but rather an avid enthusiast.

So, for all the people with an itchy trigger finger who feel that they MUST buy NOW a mirrorless that meet their needs (including "jumping ship"), why is that?

I'm not intending a flame war here, just curious.

Scott
 

neuroanatomist

I post too Much on Here!!
Jul 21, 2010
24,068
1,288
Sony says a successor to the A9 is coming. Look out! Canon is certainly facing a lot of pressure from Sony and Nikon.
Look out – reality is tapping you on the shoulder because you're ignoring it. Yeah, selling more ILCs than Sony and Nikon every year and leading the market by a very large margin does indeed put pressure on Canon.:rolleyes:
 

Jack Douglas

CR for the Humour
Apr 10, 2013
5,982
805
Alberta, Canada
Scott, the need is minimal but I've thought of getting an R as a backup so I'd have more MP for non-action shots. I sold my 6D anticipating a 6D2 for my backup but couldn't elevate the GAS. Now I'm having the same issue with the R.

From day one buying the 1DX2 I was torn by it not having more resolution than my 6D but since I bought more reach at the same time, I've managed to be happy. Video swayed me away from the 5D4, since that was a close second choice.

I was nearly ready to commit suicide when neuro predicted the 1DX2 couldn't/wouldn't have illuminated focus points!;)

Jack