This is just a Sunday reminder of the Canon EOS R5 specifications

pmjm

1DX Mk II, 5D Mk IV, 70d
Sep 8, 2016
36
9
Do we know what storage mediums it'll take? I suppose CompactFlash is dead?
 

PhotoRN86

EOS M50
May 25, 2020
26
57
I couldn’t take the wait any longer... my 5dmkiii and lenses got stolen back in April, and with my insurance money I bought the RF 50 1.2, RF 70-200m and RF 35 1.8, was going to wait until the R5 to come out to buy it but, I’ve been dying to use my lenses so I decided to buy an EOS RP to play with these lenses and to use as a compact back up for when the R5 will come out, whenever that is... I found myself going too crazy just waiting for any bit of news for the R5 and having these lenses but no body to use them on.
 

Michael Clark

Now we see through a glass, darkly...
Apr 5, 2016
2,511
1,438
Now wouldn't that be just like Canon to leave out humans...


Thank you very much for that useful and quite logical description of how things are probably done.

So perhaps part of the problem is that in this time of pandemic with 'social distancing' and limitations on the number of people on a given space, there really is only one person doing all the work...

When we get our cameras, that "Inspected by 42" stick may really mean the same person for all of them.
Nah. If they can still work in meat processing plants with plexiglass shields in place, it would be trivial to do it for bulk to retail repackaging operations.
 
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Michael Clark

Now we see through a glass, darkly...
Apr 5, 2016
2,511
1,438
yes I'm talking raw :) at this point that should be a given
There you go again. Wanting to buy a Rolls-Royce at a Toyota price, or a Rolex for a Timex price.

The Canon EOS 1D X Mark III is the first digital camera in history that has an unlimited raw buffer shooting at the camera's maximum frame rate. And suddenly we think it should be a given for every new digital camera on the market? I guess you'll next suggest that it should be a given that every sub-$500 APS-C and µ4/3 camera body heretofore introduced should be capable of 8K60 as well?

For most of us, the practical real world difference of being able to shoot bursts of raw images longer than, say, three seconds vs unlimited is trivial. In the real world where actual revenue is being generated by photographic activity, shooting at high frame rates for extended periods of time is still done almost exclusively to JPEG.

Even when it is not, there are plenty of other considerations that guide those who are doing it for a living (or even in sufficeintly large enough quantities as a hobbyist) to use the types of bodies that currently do offer extended buffer capacity. If someone is shooting sports or action more than just occasionally there are other factors that weigh heavier on the decision of what type of camera to use as well as in what file format to save them. Durability becomes a prime consideration. Thus build quality and shutter life rating are just as important as sustained burst rates.

Speed to market also becomes critical, thus dictates that most sports/action shooters go straight to JPEG so that they can push the image to their client/employer within scant seconds of shooting it when necessary. This has only recently begun to change as those sports/action photographers who do not need speed to market have only recently had the opportunity to shoot extended high speed bursts and also save raw files at the same time.
 
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Michael Clark

Now we see through a glass, darkly...
Apr 5, 2016
2,511
1,438
The RP has unlimited buffer shooting RAW with a proper UHS-II card :)
The info I've seen says 50 raw images at 5fps. Though for most use cases that's not much different from "unlimited", it does mean you can't keep shooting raw at 5 fps until your card is full or your battery is dead.
 

koenkooi

EOS 6D MK II
Feb 25, 2015
1,011
790
The info I've seen says 50 raw images at 5fps. Though for most use cases that's not much different from "unlimited", it does mean you can't keep shooting raw at 5 fps until your card is full or your battery is dead.
I just tried it on my RP: M, 1/200s, High Speed continous, MF lens, Anti-Flicker off. After 150 pictures I got bored and the buffer was still at 43 available out of 50.

From Imaging Resource:
Buffer depths were excellent with our fast Lexar Pro 2000x UHS-II card, at unlimited frames for best quality JPEG, RAW or C-RAW files.
 
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dflt

I'm New Here
Jun 8, 2013
21
2
I don't expect it to. Canon has been know to make cameras that are built like tanks. Relying an a USB cable to an external SSD for extended storage does not sound reliable, or weather proof. I use an external SSD on my Blackmagic cameras, but they are also not know for their ruggedness like Canon is.
Also, internally CFExpress is essensially a NVME SSD in a portable form, running on a PCIe 3.0 x2 bus. So much faster and scalable interface than CFast that was essensially an SATA 6Gbps SSD interface at base.
That is a zero problem to overcome. They design an adapter, you insert the ssd/m2 nvme thingy, problem solved.
 

Michael Clark

Now we see through a glass, darkly...
Apr 5, 2016
2,511
1,438
I just tried it on my RP: M, 1/200s, High Speed continous, MF lens, Anti-Flicker off. After 150 pictures I got bored and the buffer was still at 43 available out of 50.

From Imaging Resource:
Good to know, even if Canon does not make that clear on the official spec sheet, which apparently only includes the 50 shot buffer when using a "standard" SD card, whatever that is.
 

PVCC

Arts & Engineering
Jul 5, 2019
97
23
Clicks must be down, totally useless post
That's incorrect. Wrong perspective.

It's good to post all known and rumored specs after a while in ONE article because they're spread on several different posts.

Some people who didn't follow ALL posts don't have time to check EVERY post to get a clear idea.

This post is very useful.

Comments on it are another story.
 

PVCC

Arts & Engineering
Jul 5, 2019
97
23
What does the asterisk at the end of this line mean?

"No crop 8K and 4K video capture using the full-width of the sensor.*"
 

koenkooi

EOS 6D MK II
Feb 25, 2015
1,011
790
What does the asterisk at the end of this line mean?

"No crop 8K and 4K video capture using the full-width of the sensor.*"
“Only in 8k RAW and 8k/4k DCI mode” and/or calling 16:9 video from a 3:2 sensor not a crop.