Trekking with RP - Lessons learned......

JPAZ

If only I knew what I was doing.....
Sep 8, 2012
911
25
All.

Just back from a trekking trip with the RP. We were in Scotland with plenty of wind and rain. What I brought: RP with RRS L-plate + RF 24-105, EF 16-35, EF 100-400 mkii, RF/EF adapter, Monopod (more below on that), Lenscoat RainHood (more below on that), 4 batteries, filters and the usual cards, blower, lens cloth, etc. I used the Flipside Trek 450 AW since I could make this all fit along with layers, raingear, umbrella (the weather kind, not the lighting kind) water and a snack since we were overnighting in B&B's (no tents, etc. needed). Great bag for this purpose, BTW. The camera lived on a Peak Design strap around my neck and shoulder, basically slung along the front of my right hip. Here's what I learned:

-I won't go into the differences between this camera and my 5D iv since it is well discussed but the weight savings were appreciated.
-Using the right edge of the flipscreen to move the focus point as needed along with "back button" focus, I found the AF usually spot on and very quick with both the RF and the EF lenses
-On ECO mode, no issue with battery life that one can't live with. I shut the camera off pretty quickly to avoid the shifting between the screen and the EVF as I carried the camera and to stop the continuous IS. Usually made it through a day with one battery and only rarely needed to switch to a second. Obviously, YMMV depending on what you are shooting.
-Because of the weather and because of the weather sealing (or limited amount of it), the camera spent most of the day in the LensCoat. Maybe just my paranoia, but it worked pretty well to simply slide the pouch open a bit when raising the camera to my eye then pulling the string tight again when dropping it back down to my side. I left the screen "open" to speed up the maneuver rather than flipping it around for each use. Did manage to get a small scratch along the flip screen edge (maybe from a buckle on my pack? :( ) and think I will look at some of the 3rd party screen protectors out there. But show me a camera that is pristine and it will be a camera that's not being used, IMHO. Maybe next time I'll use my TT harness and carry the camera in front of my chest like I used to do when using a large pack for backpacking and carrying a DSLR.
-I really like having the histogram in the EVF when adjusting the exposure. Interesting to see how often the lights would be blown out just using the meter without the histogram. I know this histogram is based on the in-camera JPEG, but hopefully, as I plow through the post processing, I will see that it makes a difference.
-One surprise, at least to me, is what happens when I use the in-camera HDR. This came in handy in a setting like a cathedral, where the interior is relatively dark but the stained glass is bright. I usually do bracketing and deal with it later, but tried the HDR mode. The in-camera images really seemed to be pretty good BUT when taking the next shots, the device was now set to take JPEG images. I was surprised by this and had to re-set the camera back to RAW each time. So, I tried the in-camera focus bracketing and found the same thing. I guess this can be fixed with a firmware update, but be aware that the camera changes to JPEG with these maneuvers and stays in that setting requiring one to re-establish RAW for subsequent shots. Does the R act like this, as well?
-The 100-400 with the adapter worked very well BUT at 400mm, created a camera-lens combination that was physically a bit long. I have comfortably hand-held this with my 5D iv, but maybe because of the added length of the adapter and the lighter RP, it just seemed harder to keep stable by hand. This surprised me (or is it just that I am aging ;) and can't lift as well?). The monopod did come in handy for this and the RRS bracket proved its worth.
-One big limitation, I found. Don't even try BIF images. The relative imbalance of the RP with the long lens, the built in FPS limits, the limitations of the EVF all made this really difficult compared to my DSLR. Maybe with more practice?

So I just wanted to put this out there. Has anyone else used this camera in these circumstances? Anything I am missing?

All in all, I really like the RP. Depending on what the future brings, I can see a not-yet-released R* replacing my 5D iv down the road when some of these issues are resolved.
 

Pape

EOS RP
Dec 31, 2018
349
198
cool i never figured what turns raw off to jpg :) i wonder if same bug activates touch screen shutter releaser too
 

Maximilian

The dark side - I've been there
Nov 7, 2013
2,518
329
Germany
Thanks, JPAZ, for this detailed RL report of the RP.

Looks like the RP is a more than decent travel FF cam. Cool.

How did you like the feeling and delay of the EVF, esp. when it comes to faster subjects (animals, birds, cars, etc.)?
 

JPAZ

If only I knew what I was doing.....
Sep 8, 2012
911
25
How did you like the feeling and delay of the EVF, esp. when it comes to faster subjects (animals, birds, cars, etc.)?
With faster subjects, the lag can get in the way. It depends on what you are shooting, though. I tried BIF more than once and frankly, it is tough. Certainly not as much of a lag as my first OLY digital cam or as much as the original M, but for those used to DSLR, the mirrorslappers have the RP beat. But, this is nothing that makes me want to leave this camera home. And, still got some occasional decent stuff panning with a moving subject, etc. Maybe in time with practice I'll get better at it but it is different.
 

JPAZ

If only I knew what I was doing.....
Sep 8, 2012
911
25
cool i never figured what turns raw off to jpg :) i wonder if same bug activates touch screen shutter releaser too
I did not notice touch screen shutter change just the switch to jpg.
 

Maximilian

The dark side - I've been there
Nov 7, 2013
2,518
329
Germany
With faster subjects, the lag can get in the way. It depends on what you are shooting, though. I tried BIF more than once and frankly, it is tough. Certainly not as much of a lag as my first OLY digital cam or as much as the original M, but for those used to DSLR, the mirrorslappers have the RP beat. But, this is nothing that makes me want to leave this camera home. And, still got some occasional decent stuff panning with a moving subject, etc. Maybe in time with practice I'll get better at it but it is different.
Thanks for your reply. Sounds good to. Now my bank account must give me an "okay" ;)

What OLY did you use? I am used to the M5 (MK I).
 

JPAZ

If only I knew what I was doing.....
Sep 8, 2012
911
25
What OLY did you use? I am used to the M5 (MK I).
This is a "way back" question. Was not anything like an M4/3. Was a "point and shoot" Camedia model that was my first digital camera to accompany my Ricoh 35mm SLR when I did not want a bigger interchangeable lens camera with me.
 

AlanF

Everyone sits in the prison of his own ideas. A E
Aug 16, 2012
5,243
2,265
With faster subjects, the lag can get in the way. It depends on what you are shooting, though. I tried BIF more than once and frankly, it is tough. Certainly not as much of a lag as my first OLY digital cam or as much as the original M, but for those used to DSLR, the mirrorslappers have the RP beat. But, this is nothing that makes me want to leave this camera home. And, still got some occasional decent stuff panning with a moving subject, etc. Maybe in time with practice I'll get better at it but it is different.
Thanks for this and "Don't even try BIF images.". It's important for us who do BIF to be warned.
 

suburbia

EOS M50
Aug 9, 2013
45
0
I posted on the other thread about thoughts on the power consumption and trekking. I was surprised that the R power consumption was so much worse than my 5D series SLR. We are obviously at the limitations of tech here with little improvement on the horizon. I was on a city break and wasn't too impressed in having to buy a 2nd battery just to see me through the day and that was with power saving mode on (and I hated the startup delay/lag introduced by the power saving mode especially for spontaneous street shooting). There is an irony in going mirrorless for more compact form but having to weigh up on power packs. Maybe a grip with AA batteries would be better for more remote trekking. I also found the AF point ending up in some bottom corner each time I went to take a photo after perhaps being activated accidentally in the bag/swinging on the shoulder incredibly frustrating. Those two big things made me doubt my decision to move from SLR format. Maybe getting used to turning off the camera each time like you suggested is the way to go, but for me that is yet another negative.
 

JPAZ

If only I knew what I was doing.....
Sep 8, 2012
911
25
I also found the AF point ending up in some bottom corner each time I went to take a photo after perhaps being activated accidentally in the bag/swinging on the shoulder incredibly frustrating. Those two big things made me doubt my decision to move from SLR format. Maybe getting used to turning off the camera each time like you suggested is the way to go, but for me that is yet another negative.
FWIW, I have the RP on "ECO" mode. I leave it off but have not had an issue with switching on while raising to my eye (I practiced this to get it seem like an automatic maneuver). I've got the "trash can" button set up to re-center the focus point and have the right side of the screen set up for moving the point with my thumb. Having the camera off while hanging on the strap makes a big improvement in battery life. I think, when it is on and hanging, the camera is constantly changing from the rear screen to the EVF and that eats up the batteries. I also use back button focus. Unless I am doing a lot of looking and composing while running the IS, I usually get 250 - 300 shots per battery.