Two more RF mount lenses could be coming in 2019 [CR2]

saveyourmoment

EOS M50
Apr 1, 2013
46
3
Why Canon is announcing the "pro" RF Lenses an d not the "pro body"? yes perhaps the pro eosr is not ready yet, but what they do now is a quiet genius step: Announcing these lenses: every body(mostly Canon pro users) are going "wow, what great lenses, so with that i can't wait to buy the "pro eos r", so much gerat lenses.
And probably the Canon shooters want to wait for the pro body and buy these great new lenses with it.

If they would have announced the pro body first, then everybody would only focus on this pro body and would say: "yeah, is like the sony xzy, so they catched up, but where are the lenses for that body? I don't want to use the adapter. with my ef lenses..."

To announce the lenses first is a quite good marketingstrategy
 
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SwissFrank

EOS 80D
Dec 9, 2018
110
52
The main thing I'd love to buy is a pancake-type lens: 45/2.8, 35/2.8, 28/2.8 or something. I don't care if they even have to get rid of the focus ring and AF switch. (And even the auxiliary control ring.) I'm actually thinking about getting a Leica M-to-RF adapter to use my 35/1.4 Summicron but we could make something even smaller.

I've looked at the Kipon f/2.4 series and that might be the way I go, but I'd rather something even smaller.
 

transpo1

EOS 7D MK II
Jan 12, 2011
663
53
Gosh, sure would be nice to use these lenses on a camera without a 1.6x or 1.8x crop in 4K. Let me know, Canon.
 

Mikehit

EOS 5D MK IV
Jul 28, 2015
3,126
312
Why Canon is announcing the "pro" RF Lenses an d not the "pro body"? yes perhaps the pro eosr is not ready yet, but what they do now is a quiet genius step: Announcing these lenses: every body(mostly Canon pro users) are going "wow, what great lenses, so with that i can't wait to buy the "pro eos r", so much gerat lenses.
And probably the Canon shooters want to wait for the pro body and buy these great new lenses with it.

If they would have announced the pro body first, then everybody would only focus on this pro body and would say: "yeah, is like the sony xzy, so they catched up, but where are the lenses for that body? I don't want to use the adapter. with my ef lenses..."

To announce the lenses first is a quite good marketingstrategy
Why spend $4,000 on a pro body when you have no lenses worthy of it?
Working on the maxim that 'it is the lenses that matter' if you create a superb lens and put it on a lesser body you will get better results than a decent lens on a brilliant body. Also, I think bodies are pretty much flattening out regards features and quality and there are loads of compromises (do you want Canon's weather sealing or Sony's sensor? Canon's colour science or Sony's video etc etc etc) but lenses can be the real differentiation.
I remember using the EOS-R at a launch meeting and the jaw dropper for me was not the body but the 50mm f1.2. If you look at many early reviews they say pretty much the same thing.

Sony and Nikon went the other way and did bodies first. No right or wrong, just different strategies
 

Bob Howland

EOS 7D MK II
Mar 25, 2012
402
14
In September 1989, when Canon introduced their EOS-1 professional film camera, they introduced their holy trinity of lenses simultaneously. They had introduced other high end lenses previously but that was often because those lenses also being introduced for the FD lens mount simultaneously or already existed in that mount.. (The 85 f/1.2 was introduced for FD in 1981.)

In August 2007, when Nikon introduced the D3 and began their push in FF professional cameras, they simultaneously introduced their FF holy trinity, including the 14-24.

Introducing the EF 24-105 STM as a kit lens for the RP strikes me as absolutely desperate move.
 
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dolina

millennial
Dec 27, 2011
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In September 1989, when Canon introduced their EOS-1 professional film camera, they introduced their holy trinity of lenses simultaneously. They had introduced other high end lenses previously but that was often because those lenses also being introduced for the FD lens mount simultaneously or already existed in that mount.. (The 85 f/1.2 was introduced for FD in 1981.)

In August 2007, when Nikon introduced the D3 and began their push in FF professional cameras, they simultaneously introduced their FF holy trinity, including the 14-24.

Introducing the EF 24-105 STM as a kit lens for the RP strikes me as absolutely desperate move.
Seeming these are Japanese companies that offer lifetime employment it would not be surprising to know that the decision makers in the 80s & are the same as those of today.

If the whole digital still camera market were growing at 10% year over year for the past 2 decades then I'd agree that the EF system will still be developed.

But it has been in decline for nearly 1 decade. Canon even forecasted the whole digital still camera shrinking to 10 million point & shoot, dslr and mirrorless cameras by year end of 2020.
 

FramerMCB

Canon 40D & 7D
Sep 9, 2014
319
39
51
I predict Canon will not introduce Mk III versions of the 300mm f2.8L IS or the 500mm f4.0L IS in the EF mount, but rather introduce these as RF mount lenses (and probably not until they have at the very least announced the next EOS R body. The may even redo the 200mm f2.0L IS in the RF mount - Canon's sharpest lens ever (per various reviews - I have no first-hand use/knowledge of this).

I also predict a 28-135 f3.0 (or 2.8) - 4.0 USM as a kit (or possibly a 24-120mm) in the RF mount...
Exciting times.
 

Drainpipe

It's all about the little things.
Aug 30, 2014
85
14
www.instagram.com
I’m sincerely hoping that the MP-E 65mm gets an RF update. Slim chance it’s going to be one of these first lenses, but I can always dream.
 

Michael Clark

Now we see through a glass, darkly...
Apr 5, 2016
423
147
How about an RF-EF 1.4X teleconverter. That would be ideal for people with some big EF glass already in hand. I mean, if you're going to fill that space, it might as well be with a teleconverter for use with long glass.
It's not that simple. One reason the Canon extenders give such high quality images compared to the teleconverter designs from other lensmakers is that the front of them extends into the rear of the main lens. The optical elements for an extender with such high optical quality would still need to be located in front of the extra 24mm spacing taken up by an EF to RF adapter. So your EF to RF adapter with built-in 1.4X TC would be about the same size, length, and weight as a regular EF to RF adapter coupled with an EF1.4X III.

I wish they would make a cheap wide angle, something that will pair well with the RP camera. Like the EF-s 10-18 but for full frame.
A FF 10-18 is 16-28.8. There is already the EF 16-35mm f/4. We'll probably see something similar in RF eventually. As the size of the image circle grows, "cheap" gets harder and harder for wide angle lenses with an expectation of high image quality.

Of course, but why add length to an already lengthy package. I mean it's not a big deal, but why add a half inch or so of additional length to the lens with the adapter, and then another inch and a quarter for the 1.4X.
See above. The resulting EF to RF adapter with 1.4X would be the same length as an EF to RF adapter + EF1.4X to give the same performance.

gnah i am allergic for smell of lens rubber .all canon lenses got rubber wheels for zoom and focus?
They are fairly easy to remove.

It is often said that the overwhelming number of customers for the Rebels buy only the 18-55mm and sometimes as well the 55-250mm as part of a kit and no other lenses. If true, then the RF 24-105mm may well be sufficient for the RP as a consumer body for the majority of buyers.
If they do buy more, the first one is almost always a 50mm f/1.8. It's interesting that they went with the RF 35mm f/1.8 IS STM before releasing a consumer 50mm f/1.8.


Sure, if you like a zoom with a 100mm-diameter (at least) front element...
Why not go whole hog and make it f/2.8 with a front element at least 142mm across?


Only if they copied the optics of the EF extender exactly. Why would they? Even EF teleconverters from different manufacturers are different lengths!

At the backplane of the EF lens the optics are making a 44mm image circle. An EF TC takes the central 32 or 22mm portion of that and bends it out again to 44mm in a telephoto manner. An EF-RF-TC insert would actually have an easier job because the optics could be 'weaker' in that it has a longer distance in which to do that. Less bending, more quality.
That's not exactly how it works. Just because the IC at the sensor is 44mm does not mean the image circle cone is that large when it passes through the flange. Many wide aperture lenses have baffles behind the rear element that are smaller than the 54mm throat (or the 44mm diagonal of the sensor). They do this to reduce flare caused by light outside the part of the image circle that will actually fall on the sensor reflecting off the walls of the mirror box. Remember, with zoom lenses the IC is often much larger at longer focal lengths than the minimum IC needed for a particular sensor size. The IC is usually the smallest at the shortest FL and expands more or less in proportion to the zoom ratio as it is zoomed.

It would be huge, heavy, expensive. Look at the 200/2L IS... That's a prime with a 100mm front element.
Or look at the EF 200-400mm f/4 1.4X. Also look at the price. Now you want a 100-400 f/4?

I agree with his comment and had personally made similar comments earlier.
On the positive note: argubly, Canon's best strength is making the glass. They are putting their best options on the table. Even for EOSM, they started relatively strong but felt short quickly (22mm & 11-22). For R, they've shown much more commitment. I think even if R doesn't succeed in photo, it will become a movie maker's mount although the bodies suggest the opposite!
They probably intended to do more for EOS-M before shifting over to RF, but market forces forced them to shift gears to FF RF earlier than they had planned?

Will Canon just abandon all wildlife shooters by not updating the 7D or just drop the whole Rebel line?
I don't think so. I think they will release one more version of 7D/80D and by the time of the next update in 4-5 years, mirrorless will be good enough in performance to make everything mirrorless.
I hope you are right about one more high end APS-C "sports/wildlife" body. Call it a 7D Mark III or a 90D.



It’s interesting to look at Olympus. Their latest beast has a 60FPS mode on the bursts, and then there is the “ pro capture” mode which buffers a number of shots before the shutter is pressed so that if you miss the action, you can go back! I really could have used that yesterday when photographing chickadees. Then we have AI tracking!

I’m not upgrading my 7D2 until I can do something similar, so at least for me, that means no more mirrored cameras.
That 60fps does not have the ability to do AF tracking of a moving subject. It slows down to about 1/3 that speed if you want to refocus between each frame.


Of course it would add length. But it would only add the length of one device rather than 2. As it stands now, you have the length of the adapter plus the length of the teleconverter. You could save maybe half an inch or so by combining the 2 functions, with a teleconverter that is designed for the shorter flange-sensor distance in the first place.

Again, not a really big deal, but not impossible either.
You'd also get the lower IQ current TCs with elements that don't extend into the back of lenses with a 44mm registration give. The reason Canon calls their magnifiers "extenders" is because they "extend" into the rear of the lens.

Not all but plenty, especially bird photographers. What should they buy? A 5D4 or 1DX with 600mm F4?
I'm sure Canon would be more than happy if even 2/3 of the 7DII/100-40mm users did that!


And a magic lens :love:
For $5.7K, it had better be magic!


The focal length and speed of the lenses Canon chooses to release first could be used as an indicator of what lenses will sell the most out of the gate. Any delays on the zooms could be technical or manufacturing process in nature.

If Canon were to maintain a release clip of 8 RF L lenses every 12 months would allow them to replicate the EF lineup in about 4 years.

I would not be surprised if the RF equivalent of the TS-E lenses were released after the fast long white primes.
I would not be surprised if it is a very, very, very long time before we see fast, long white primes in RF mount. The disappearance of the pro sports shooter that can actually afford such lenses and still make a living is going to make such lenses very low volume. And there is little advantage to the shorter registration distance for such long focal lengths.
 

dolina

millennial
Dec 27, 2011
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I would not be surprised if it is a very, very, very long time before we see fast, long white primes in RF mount. The disappearance of the pro sports shooter that can actually afford such lenses and still make a living is going to make such lenses very low volume. And there is little advantage to the shorter registration distance for such long focal lengths.
Photo news agencies are major customer. They buy these lenses by the dozen. They tend to buy them every Olympics. The next long lens could happen a year before the 2024 or 2028 Summer Olympics. By then EF production would be sunsetting.

Another major customer are wildlife photographers, govt and named independent sport photographers

Here is the release date of every EF 400mm f/2.8 lens and in which Summer Olympics it was developed for.
  • December 2018 - 400mm f/2.8L IS III USM for the 2020 Summer Olympics
  • August 2011 - 400mm f/2.8L IS II USM for the 2012 Summer Olympics
  • September 1999 - 400mm f/2.8L IS USM for the 2000 Summer Olympics
  • March 1996 - 400mm f/2.8L II USM for the 1996 Summer Olympics
  • April 1991 - 400mm f/2.8L USM for the 1992 Summer Olympics
Sales of these sort of lenses tend to be least impacted by smartphones unlike other DSCs.
 
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koenkooi

EOS 80D
Feb 25, 2015
180
64
I’m sincerely hoping that the MP-E 65mm gets an RF update. Slim chance it’s going to be one of these first lenses, but I can always dream.
If they do, I hope Canon will consider moving it to a 0.8 - 4x range to be able to get bigger things in frame.
Has anyone tried an MP-E on an R yet to see if the focus guides work?
 
Aug 22, 2010
1,518
212
48
Uk
www.GMCPhotographics.co.uk
What's the point in putting a ef 400 LIS III on an Eos R? It's AF can't track that fast....it's Servo mode is pedestrian and hesitant at best. Certainly not in the 5D4 / 1DxII league. The big whites won't come to Rf until Canon have cracked the speed and tracking accuracy of their software based dual pixel AF....until then....ef is the way to go for big lens photography.
 

Michael Clark

Now we see through a glass, darkly...
Apr 5, 2016
423
147
Photo news agencies are major customer. They buy these lenses by the dozen. They tend to buy them every Olympics. The next long lens could happen a year before the 2024 or 2028 Summer Olympics. By then EF production would be sunsetting.

Another major customer are wildlife photographers, govt and named independent sport photographers

Here is the release date of every EF 400mm f/2.8 lens and in which Summer Olympics it was developed for.
  • December 2018 - 400mm f/2.8L IS III USM for the 2020 Summer Olympics
  • August 2011 - 400mm f/2.8L IS II USM for the 2012 Summer Olympics
  • September 1999 - 400mm f/2.8L IS USM for the 2000 Summer Olympics
  • March 1996 - 400mm f/2.8L II USM for the 1996 Summer Olympics
  • April 1991 - 400mm f/2.8L USM for the 1992 Summer Olympics
Sales of these sort of lenses tend to be least impacted by smartphones unlike other DSCs.
Photo news agencies rarely have staff photographers to whom they issue company owned gear anymore, at least not in the United States. It's all freelancers being paid pennies on the dollar now. Sports freelancers that used to be paid $250 per half page image by major publications (many of whom are now out of print) are now getting $2.50 per use from Getty for the same image.

That's not exactly a sustainable business model that allows buying new big whites every time they are released. One of the few surviving full-time staffers I know (he's the only one left of a newspaper staff that had four photogs just 3 years ago - if his newspaper didn't get most of their subscriptions because they cover a major college's athletic teams, including the football team which has won 5 championships in the last decade, he might be gone by now, too) is still shooting with the EF 400mm f/2.8 L IS released in 1999.

As for independent sports photographers, it's far worse now than it was in 2015 when this article was published:

What Killed Editorial Sports Photography?: You’ve Got To Hustle As A Sports Shooter These Days
 
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Michael Clark

Now we see through a glass, darkly...
Apr 5, 2016
423
147
If they do, I hope Canon will consider moving it to a 0.8 - 4x range to be able to get bigger things in frame.
Has anyone tried an MP-E on an R yet to see if the focus guides work?
What focus guides? There is only one focus distance for any particular magnification. You set the magnification, then you move the entire camera/len towards or away from the subject until it is in focus.
 

dolina

millennial
Dec 27, 2011
1,975
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What's the point in putting a ef 400 LIS III on an Eos R? It's AF can't track that fast....it's Servo mode is pedestrian and hesitant at best. Certainly not in the 5D4 / 1DxII league. The big whites won't come to Rf until Canon have cracked the speed and tracking accuracy of their software based dual pixel AF....until then....ef is the way to go for big lens photography.
Canon has 17 months to release a mirrorless 1DX2 and 5D4 successor. If it isn’t to your liking I’m sure they will still sell DSLRs next year.
 
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koenkooi

EOS 80D
Feb 25, 2015
180
64
What focus guides? There is only one focus distance for any particular magnification. You set the magnification, then you move the entire camera/len towards or away from the subject until it is in focus.
The guides shown at item number 8 here: https://snapshot.canon-asia.com/article/en/8-eos-r-focusing-features-we-cant-wait-to-try

I currently use 10x zoom while moving the camera back and forth, which sometimes messes up the composition due to tilt or rotation. I've seen reports that focus guides work with old manual lenses that have been chipped, if that's true it should work with the MP-E as well.
 

bf

EOS RP
Jul 30, 2014
238
8
They probably intended to do more for EOS-M before shifting over to RF, but market forces forced them to shift gears to FF RF earlier than they had planned?
This was back to 2012-2013! M did not meet the expectations and Canon put everything on clearance and left several markets including the USA for a few years! They skipped M2 in these regions and officially returned with EOS M3 in 2015. Lenses with a plastic mount (some say to save weight) and bodies with PowerShot firmware happened during this period. EF-M 32f1.4 was finally offered as a finer glass after 7 years of waiting.
 

Drainpipe

It's all about the little things.
Aug 30, 2014
85
14
www.instagram.com
If they do, I hope Canon will consider moving it to a 0.8 - 4x range to be able to get bigger things in frame.
Has anyone tried an MP-E on an R yet to see if the focus guides work?
Are you me? I keep saying this, only I would extend those ranges to go from .5x - 4x. Half life size is great for some of the larger beetles. Really the only thing I don't like about the MP-E is that it starts at 1x. I have tried to replicate the MP-E experience with a 100L, but it's just not the same. The MP-E is really in a class of its own.


The guides shown at item number 8 here: https://snapshot.canon-asia.com/article/en/8-eos-r-focusing-features-we-cant-wait-to-try

I currently use 10x zoom while moving the camera back and forth, which sometimes messes up the composition due to tilt or rotation. I've seen reports that focus guides work with old manual lenses that have been chipped, if that's true it should work with the MP-E as well.

Welp, if this works it's selling me more and more on the R series. I'm waiting for the 5RSR or whatever they're going to call the big megapixel mirrorless monster. Being able to zoom at 10x AND have a focusing guide? Would be awesome with the MP-E.
 

koenkooi

EOS 80D
Feb 25, 2015
180
64
Are you me? I keep saying this, only I would extend those ranges to go from .5x - 4x. Half life size is great for some of the larger beetles. Really the only thing I don't like about the MP-E is that it starts at 1x. I have tried to replicate the MP-E
experience with a 100L, but it's just not the same. The MP-E is really in a class of its own.[..]
I have exactly the same issues, but a bit worse due to using 1.6x crop sensors :)

What I did the past 2 summers was using both M + MP-E and 100D + EF-S 60mm for close up work. Start with the EF-S 60mm to sneak up on solitary bees building their nests and use the MP-E to camp out.

And you can go from this:
37140950133_c11ce2e2bb_k.jpg


to the next picture without too much trouble:
36518134520_aca6a81da2_k.jpg
 

Viggo

EOS 5D SR
Dec 13, 2010
3,814
372
Michael Clark:

Yes, the new retail price of the 200 f2.0 L is crazy, but here in Scandinavia I’ve bought two of them at 1/3 of the retail price, one was quite a few hundred dollars less than a new 70-200 mk2. People don’t get how much better it is, or are not willing to carry the weight. So they are very rarely on sale here, and they are a very tough sell. But for me I can buy and sell it and make money on them when I want something else. I’m 100% sure I’m gonna buy a third copy sometime .. then someone in this thread mentioned a RF 200 f2.0 L and I didnt hear anything after that thought set in my head :LOL::LOL: