with the price of RF L glass might as well jump to Fuji gfx?

JoTomOz

EOS T7i
Nov 21, 2018
56
33
www.flickr.com
So I bought the Eos R at launch, aiming to future proof expensive lens purchases (I have several mostly lower end Ef lenses). Was even prepared to pay the big bucks for the new RF L primes slowly as they come out. Then in a review for the RF 50mm someone mentioned the price of the eos r plus RF 50mm not being far off the Fujifilm gfx 50r (medium format) plus the 50mm equivalent lens. For an 85mm equivalent prime it’s 2200 vs 2700 for the new RF lens. It got me thinking- if I’m willing to pay more than medium format prices for lenses, should I be saving my money to eventually go into crop medium format instead? I realise medium format is not for everyone, but judging from the way the gfx system is headed it made me stop and think.

What do people think about Fuji gfx compared to Canon RF?
 

ArtisanCraft

EOS R
Jan 28, 2019
13
16
www.instagram.com
The GFX 50 R does not look like a nice camera to me. The GFX 100 seems to be the least I would expect before I jump ship.

I considered the jump too, but the pre-GFX 100 cameras are just too clunky, with disappointing ergos and AF. I'll reiterate though, the GFX 100 is absolutely stunning. I handled it at the store for a good hour and it is not a camera that you'll be tempted to leave at home because of size/weight/ergos/AF, like the other GFX cameras.
 
Mar 14, 2012
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The question is what you intend to use it for. A lot of my photos are from travel or from kids sports and school events. I'm using FF and the 16-35, 24-70, 70-200, 100-400 are my most used lenses. They're heavy enough as they are, I'd hate to carry something heavier if I moved to a larger format.

Also consider this: The RF is a new system and Canon always charges a premium for the best glass at launch. Remember when the 24-70 f/2.8 II and 100-400 II debuted at over 2k? Now new lenses are going for a lot less than their initial prices. The trend will also happen with RF glass. It's already happening with the R and RF 24-105. The other point is that there are more users for the EOS ecosystem than the GFX. Once all the prices settle after a few years, I'd suspect the R lenses to cost less than Fuji's medium format lenses.
 
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Kit.

EOS 6D MK II
Apr 25, 2011
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So I bought the Eos R at launch, aiming to future proof expensive lens purchases (I have several mostly lower end Ef lenses). Was even prepared to pay the big bucks for the new RF L primes slowly as they come out. Then in a review for the RF 50mm someone mentioned the price of the eos r plus RF 50mm not being far off the Fujifilm gfx 50r (medium format) plus the 50mm equivalent lens.
"Equivalent"?
Are you talking about Zhongyi Mitakon 65/1.4?
Are you aware that it's manual focus and not particularly sharp wide open?

For an 85mm equivalent prime it’s 2200 vs 2700 for the new RF lens.
Are you talking about Fujinon GF 110/2?
Are you aware that it is slower than 85/1.4? It has an about f/1.55 equivalent aperture.
How come you think it's "equivalent" to 85/1.2?

What do people think about Fuji gfx compared to Canon RF?
I think it lacks equivalent lenses.
 

JoTomOz

EOS T7i
Nov 21, 2018
56
33
www.flickr.com
The GFX 50 R does not look like a nice camera to me. The GFX 100 seems to be the least I would expect before I jump ship.

I considered the jump too, but the pre-GFX 100 cameras are just too clunky, with disappointing ergos and AF. I'll reiterate though, the GFX 100 is absolutely stunning. I handled it at the store for a good hour and it is not a camera that you'll be tempted to leave at home because of size/weight/ergos/AF, like the other GFX cameras.
Yeah, if the GFX 100 is an indication of what the 50s/r model replacements will look like- that’s what has me thinking (it would probably be a while as I could of course make do with what I have for a while) . Haven’t actually held the 50s/r before- thanks for sharing the experience on the ergonomics.
 

JoTomOz

EOS T7i
Nov 21, 2018
56
33
www.flickr.com
The question is what you intend to use it for. A lot of my photos are from travel or from kids sports and school events. I'm using FF and the 16-35, 24-70, 70-200, 100-400 are my most used lenses. They're heavy enough as they are, I'd hate to carry something heavier if I moved to a larger format.

Also consider this: The RF is a new system and Canon always charges a premium for the best glass at launch. Remember when the 24-70 f/2.8 II and 100-400 II debuted at over 2k? Now new lenses are going for a lot less than their initial prices. The trend will also happen with RF glass. It's already happening with the R and RF 24-105. The other point is that there are more users for the EOS ecosystem than the GFX. Once all the prices settle after a few years, I'd suspect the R lenses to cost less than Fuji's medium format lenses.
I shot with mostly primes (between 24-135mm) at the moment so perhaps that’s why it seems somewhat doable to me, in any case weight has never been an issue to me. I do get some use out of the 100-400mm v1 though.

Good points about lens prices- The Fuji lenses haven’t been around that long and I guess I assumed they would also fall over time like canon’s- worth looking into. Not sure how I feel about waiting a while for them to drop in price, I guess it depends on how fast they drop- yes you are paying less but you don’t get to use them in the meantime so to some extent it balances out I reckon.
 

JoTomOz

EOS T7i
Nov 21, 2018
56
33
www.flickr.com
Exactly. If you are interested in having a big collection of lenses, then sure, go ahead and pick the system that gets you the most lenses. But if you are interested in actually taking pictures, pick the format that works for your needs.
I have started printing big prints of my son for family living overseas, they love them, and it has changed things as I never use to think I needed high resolution. Sure, canon will likely come out with a high megapixel camera, facilitating that kind of resolution for full frame format may be why they are so expensive. The autofocus of the 50s/r out now probably won’t cut it for me. I just always seemed to assume full frame was the pinnacle and best for my needs but am starting to wonder and was wondering if other canon full- framers were too.
 

JoTomOz

EOS T7i
Nov 21, 2018
56
33
www.flickr.com
"Equivalent"?
Are you talking about Zhongyi Mitakon 65/1.4?
Are you aware that it's manual focus and not particularly sharp wide open?


Are you talking about Fujinon GF 110/2?
Are you aware that it is slower than 85/1.4? It has an about f/1.55 equivalent aperture.
How come you think it's "equivalent" to 85/1.2?


I think it lacks equivalent lenses.
Valid point of course. I am talking the autofocus fujinon lenses but was meaning in terms of focal length. I do love me some shallow depth of field but it is one concern among many. I guess I figured the light gathering of the 68%(?) larger sensor makes up for slower apertures.

And I figure GFX is pretty a pretty young system at the moment. I figure faster lenses are in the horizon and I wouldn’t be jumping anytime soon.
 

CanonFanBoy

EOS 5D SR
Jan 28, 2015
4,080
1,624
Irving, Texas
I have started printing big prints of my son for family living overseas, they love them, and it has changed things as I never use to think I needed high resolution. Sure, canon will likely come out with a high megapixel camera, facilitating that kind of resolution for full frame format may be why they are so expensive. The autofocus of the 50s/r out now probably won’t cut it for me. I just always seemed to assume full frame was the pinnacle and best for my needs but am starting to wonder and was wondering if other canon full- framers were too.
Then there's the other problem: Will Fuji ultimately survive the contraction of the market and what is their service like? I understand wanting to print big. I have had a lot of 20x30 size prints done. My lowly 5D Mark III handles it fine. Personally, I think it would handle 40x60" prints fine. There are other, and probably better, reasons to go medium format in my mind. Likely you'd be able to use RF lenses for 20+ years if the electronics hold up.
 
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Kit.

EOS 6D MK II
Apr 25, 2011
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Valid point of course. I am talking the autofocus fujinon lenses but was meaning in terms of focal length. I do love me some shallow depth of field but it is one concern among many. I guess I figured the light gathering of the 68%(?) larger sensor makes up for slower apertures.
The amount of light a lens gathers from a given solid angle is only determined by the entrance pupil of the lens. A larger format allows for development of lenses with larger entrance pupils (for the same entrance pupil size, it is easier to focus light on a larger sensor than on a smaller sensor, and lenses faster than f/0.5 are thermodynamically impossible), but, once developed, these lenses will be heavier and more expensive.
 

Mt Spokane Photography

I post too Much on Here!!
Mar 25, 2011
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To me, a large format sensor is capable of very nice landscape and portrait images, and if thats where you make your money, you should be considering them. If you want everyday walk around images, even a FF sensor camera is pushing it for size, particularly when you add in a good lens.

I'd definitely rent or borrow a large format camera to try. Too many have lamented that its difficult to just walk around and get a sharp image. It takes planing and careful use. Then, the results are wonderful.

Another benefit with a large format camera is that lenses don't need to be as sharp as they do with a small sensor camera. Thats a good thing, because making them that sharp is very expensive. VERY.
 
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