"Your camera takes great photos" and other peeves

anthonyd

EOS 80D
Mar 4, 2013
161
0
45
Knoxville, TN
Roo said:
My pet peeve at the moment is the use of the word 'photographer'....
+1

I hear you. I am a computer scientist. A real one, with a PhD and a full time job as a research scientist at a University. Every time I'm at a large family gathering I'll run into the occasional uncle who will talk to me about his niece who also works with computers ... which turns out to be a secretary typing on a computer all day long.
That's why when somebody asks me if I'm a photographer I say "no, I'm a photography enthusiast", although I do make money out of photography and have taken some decent pictures (according to other people's opinions on 500px, flickr and this forum).
 

7enderbender

EOS 7D MK II
Feb 17, 2011
644
5
Boston, MA
iron-t said:
I want to hear from everyone on the most annoying things people commonly say to them about their cameras, lenses, other gear, images and photography in general. My personal favorite is "wow, your camera takes great pictures," or, while looking at my images, "you have a great camera."

I used to launch into an explanation of how much time and energy I have invested in improving my technique and artistic vision, but found the results dissatisfying (common response: "well sure you have to know how to use it"). So I just accede, "yes, it's easier to get good pictures with a good camera."

I wouldn't even respond really. Or if they have kids you could in return compliment them on their private parts. May not go over well with some folks though.
 

Joe M

EOS 80D
Aug 29, 2013
196
1
I actually find it strange sometimes that couples don't ask me what gear I use. I never get asked what body, what lenses, lights, umbrellas or so forth. They just look at the sample albums and decide I'm the guy for their day. I do get the odd one ask casually about lighting or asking if I use Canon or Nikon and whether I'm still using film. Those couples though are usually using a standard "questions for your photographer" that they find in wedding books or online.
Most comments I find interesting are usually from guests. My most pleasant conversation was at a recent wedding where the father of the groom spotted me using a prime. He thought he was the only one still using them and we had a great few minutes talking about the pros of when and where they shine.
My oddest conversation was a guest who needed to know if my gear was digital or film and how much it all cost. Cost? Her photographer friend had told her, you see, that digital wasn't as good as film. Yes I shoot digital and the cost is between me, my account and wife.
And yes, I've heard the range of comments from, "I hope I don't crack your lens" to "can you take off twenty pounds?". Well, it hasn't yet so don't jinx me and yes, that costs extra for my time in photoshop but I think you look fine as you are. Seriously though, I have had brides that have regretted the tattoos they have, and asked me to get rid of them from every shot.
 
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paul13walnut5

Guest
Joe M said:
Seriously though, I have had brides that have regretted the tattoos they have, and asked me to get rid of them from every shot.
Complete tangent, but that's hilarious.

I never got a tattoo (yet) because I didn't want it to be something I regretted.

I scoff heartily at all these fannies who got 'tramp stamps' based on what Pink or whoever else on MTV had, and then three years down the line when they want to kid on they are virigins, and never went to nightclubs and never smoked etc when they decide they want lecrueset cookware and an actuary husband they try and get them removed etc.

The way I see it, if your gormless husband to be liked you when you first met and you had your tatts and peircings then surely, he's only worth marrying (I mean worth in the moral, not financial sense) if he accepts them now?

That said. Getting a tatto of a dolphin across your breasts probably wasn't the best idea you ever had.
 

cid

"light is defining shape"
Nov 27, 2012
401
0
500px.com
ninjapeps said:
"I hope you don't just shoot in auto."
I think this is one of the better ones, at least he/she knows there is something called auto and even something else besides it :)
 

YuengLinger

EOS 5D MK IV
Dec 20, 2012
2,853
1,097
Southeastern USA
Nothing a client, bystander, or even fellow photographer could say would be as insulting to a photographer as his/her own whining about not getting the "respect" he/she thinks he/she is entitled to.

In other words, as said long ago by Pogo, "We have met the enemy, and he is us."

If the weather permits, get the heck out there and take some pictures!
 

Maximilian

The dark side - I've been there
Nov 7, 2013
2,823
814
Germany
anthonyd said:
I always responded "I'll take your picture with your camera, if I can first take your picture with _my_ camera"! I collected several nice portraits of people I never knew this way.
hey anthony, that is a nice idea.
I think, I'll have to remember that. Thank you.
 
Mar 14, 2012
2,338
221
cid said:
Once I was on a trip and friend of mine was very interested in my camera ... well until the moment she discovered that with that lens she cannot zoom at all. "What is it good for when you cannot zoom?" I tried to explain and then shook her head because she couldn't understand the cost and size of this lens when it can't do what she wants.

Even more they shook their heads when I tell them, that every photo needs to be postprocessed (let's say only exported to jpg), they are used to do things conveniently. (And I'm not even mentioning panorama stitching or portrait retouching and time spent on this)
If it makes you feel any better, I find a lot of people expect all dedicated cameras to have zoom capability. I picked up a EOS-M during a fire-sale with the 22 f/2. I handed it to my wife and to a friend to try out on separate occasions. They both asked me how to make it zoom. Suffice it to say, I ended up picking up a white box EOS-M 18-55 for the wife to use. I use the 22 f/2.

When some of my friends first saw the 70-200 II, they thought it had a much longer FL than it did because it was so large/heavy. I use the 70-200 II a lot when my girls are playing soccer, and I've had the usual comments from random strangers like "Wow, that is some lens!" And my default reply, "Yes, it is!" It surprises me that there aren't more parents with better cameras. After all, I see higher quality lenses/camera combinations at berry farms/apple orchards than I see at the kids' games.

I've actually found it to be more awkward interacting with parents when we're watching our kids' team play together. You can hear their frustration trying to capture their kids on phones/cameras wanting to get a good pic but are unable to due to equipment limitations, technique or position issues. And you know that they are wondering if you are getting any good shots with your camera, but they are too shy to ask. I used to take pics exclusively of my kids, but I've come around to taking more shots during the scrimmages of their teammates too. I then send the parents links to the SmugMug galleries and the most common response I get to those pictures is one of gratefulness. That, and the awkwardness is now gone. It's much easier talking to other parents and I have the freedom to take pictures however I want.
 

Pugshot

EOS M50
Nov 30, 2012
45
0
The times when I've had someone comment on my camera or lens have usually been the times I was photographing my grandkids' baseball or basketball games - and most of the time it's been because they're envious and want to get a nice 70-200 f/2.8 L IS USM for their 50D or Rebel. On occasion there have been some people who mistake me for the "pro" at the wedding, etc. simply because of my "big white lens" - or just because I'm using a DSLR. And there have been a few people who make joking remarks that display their ignorance. But I've rarely had to deal with anyone who truly qualified as a jerk. Usually it's just people expressing, even if ineptly, their assumptions about my skill level based on my equipment. Given that the general population thinks that slightly out-of-focus photos taken with iPhones and P&S cameras on auto are "great" photos, I generally just try to smile and respond politely. I can understand, because when I'm in the presence of a real pro with a 1DX and a 600mm, I get a little "gaga" myself!
 
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paul13walnut5

Guest
Pugshot said:
On occasion there have been some people who mistake me for the "pro" at the wedding, etc. simply because of my "big white lens" - or just because I'm using a DSLR.
I personally wouldn't take my big white lens or big DSLR to a wedding unless I was the 'pro'. I'm there as a guest, not to get under the photographers feet.
 

Don Haines

Beware of cats with laser eyes!
Jun 4, 2012
8,262
1,921
Canada
neuroanatomist said:
dstppy said:
Listen, I know if I got it or not, what is a 3" screen going to tell you?
Now see, if you had a real camera, like a 6D or even a Nikon Coolpix, you could WiFi that image right to the iPad you'd have on hand just in case someone asked.
If you had a real camera, you could just show the picture on the iPad it was taken with :)
 

iron-t

EOS T7i
Oct 8, 2013
80
0
Zv said:
Coming in late to this thread but yeah I don't particularly like when people compliment the camera - "your camera is awesome, I want one like that", "how much was you camera", "your pics are great what camera do you use?" Etc.

I think they're just trying to be nice and pay me a compliment in a round-about way. However to me It's kinda like they're saying - "hey, well done for being able to spend large amounts of cash on your equipment. You must be doing well to be able to waste your money on fancy gadgets! Of course your pictures are good, they ought to be for that price!"

:mad:
That captures my sentiment precisely and probably reveals a lot about both of us. I'm not a pro, but I am a relatively passionate amateur. I have an above-average level of disposable income. I guess I am sensitive that people are mistaking me for a rich asshole who buys expensive toys to demonstrate status.

I think the next step will be to respond to "your camera takes great photos" with "thank you! Tell me what you like about these images. I'm always trying to improve my craft."
 
May 8, 2013
1,853
1
A most amusing and entertaining thread to read. ;D

A thread kevetching about people complementing equipment, that is posted in a forum on a website almost entirely dedicated to discussions about camera gear.

I especially like reading the comments about how the equipment is not the important thing from posters who list all their equipment in their signature.

You guys are a hoot! LoL
 

Pugshot

EOS M50
Nov 30, 2012
45
0
I personally wouldn't take my big white lens or big DSLR to a wedding unless I was the 'pro'. I'm there as a guest, not to get under the photographers feet.
It was my nephew's wedding; he asked me to bring my camera and supplement the wedding photographer; I was extremely sensitive to the hired pro and made sure to stay out of her way (i.e., let her get her shots first and just grab a quick shot after she was done, or work as a second camera shooting things or people she didn't have the time or inclination to do). Give me at least a little credit, man! :)
 

Zlyden

EOS T7i
Nov 8, 2013
85
0
After reading few more pages of this thread, I looked at google-banner (helpfully provided below the last post).

It said (translated from Russian, I hope that in other countries you see different adds in other languages):

"I am talented. I create masterpieces. I am a new D5300. I am a Nikon." (Just click this nikon.ru link, while you see me!)

Camera manufacturers do lead people to believe that "you need the right camera to take a great photo". Whole "I am a Nikon" ads campaign is about it.

So, well, in the end, what reaction do you expect from the general public who watch this stuff, except: "What camera did you use to shoot this? Is it Nikon D5300 or Nikon 1?"

:)
 

expatinasia

EOR R
Aug 18, 2011
1,712
6
Asia Pacific
I do not mind when people complement the picture taking capability of my camera. It is awesome and makes my life so much easier than it was in the past.

What I do not like is when I do a shoot and present the pictures and the client tells me he loves them, but that he also wanted pictures of A, B, C and D. That really annoys me, as he could have told me that at the very beginning. Now I just take a lot more pics than is in the brief and hopefully cover all eventualities.
 
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paul13walnut5

Guest
Zlyden said:
After reading few more pages of this thread, I looked at google-banner (helpfully provided below the last post).

It said (translated from Russian, I hope that in other countries you see different adds in other languages):

"I am talented. I create masterpieces. I am a new D5300. I am a Nikon." (Just click this nikon.ru link, while you see me!)

Camera manufacturers do lead people to believe that "you need the right camera to take a great photo". Whole "I am a Nikon" ads campaign is about it.

So, well, in the end, what reaction do you expect from the general public who watch this stuff, except: "What camera did you use to shoot this? Is it Nikon D5300 or Nikon 1?"

:)
Those google banners are unique to you, I've often heard folk complain about distasteful spam, when it actually reveals their own browsing habits. You quite clearly have been looking at some websites you shouldn't have. Nikon, indeed.