Adobe Apologizes for Bugs in Lightroom Classic CC, Releases Update

cayenne

EOS R6
CR Pro
Mar 28, 2012
2,580
548
Hmm.....you might consider giving On1 RAW a try as an alternative.
- No rental model, and very reasonably priced
- Regular meaningful update
- So far, no updates that break your system or slow it down
- No forced upgrades
- Use a catalog or don't, its up to you
- No perceived moves to have you store your content on the cloud rather than locally.

So far, so good for me at least......
 

Random Orbits

EOS 5D Mark IV
Mar 14, 2012
2,433
304
YuengLinger said:
Perhaps a genuine expression of goodwill from Adobe would be a new version that allows use of the editing software without any catalog. The scariest of the recent bugs is the catalog corruption.

What does deserve loathing, in my opinion, is Adobe's implied impending termination of "allowing" images to be stored locally on a user's desktop. Naming the desktop/laptop version of Lightroom "Classic," seems a shot across the bow, suggesting those of us who don't want to use cloud storage are anachronisms.

I'm ok with a subscription based payment scheme. Fine. But pressuring photographers to move images to the cloud or see an end to functionality and upgrades would be a bridge too far. I don't understand what motive, other than keeping cloud stored files as hostages, a company could have for heading in such a direction.

I see value in a cloud-based model for those that travel to well-connected spots or for multiple people to work on a file from different locations (in the field and at the home office). Unfortunately, I don't travel that much so the feature does not appeal to me. And the biggest trips the last couple years have to been to national parks, which have horrid to no internet/cell phone connectivity. And yes, naming it LR Classic is clunky/bad marketing... It would have been better if they kept the original LightRoom name and called the new product LightRoom Cloud.
 

Otara

EOS RP
CR Pro
Jul 16, 2012
408
199
The cloud issue isnt really a problem as long as they have to charge for online storage - as soon as you try to copy pictures and they tell you that it cant be uploaded till you make room or pay more, thats a customer gone.

They can try to convince people to use it, but actually stopping local storage as an additional backup would be a whole different story. I dont have any concerns about 'cloud only' being compulsory any time soon.
 
Apr 18, 2016
6
0
33
Wichita, KS
Adobe still hasn't fixed the bug since Classic CC's launch that allows some people with a perpetual license for Lightroom 6 to upgrade to a "perpetual" Classic CC which shouldn't even be possible. Doing that leads to a screwed up install that functions but numerous things are totally broken or missing.

Some people have updated from Lightroom 6 without realizing they're not supposed to be able to and it's been going on for 6 months now.
 

scottkinfw

Wildlife photography is my passion
CR Pro
YuengLinger said:
Perhaps a genuine expression of goodwill from Adobe would be a new version that allows use of the editing software without any catalog. The scariest of the recent bugs is the catalog corruption.

What does deserve loathing, in my opinion, is Adobe's implied impending termination of "allowing" images to be stored locally on a user's desktop. Naming the desktop/laptop version of Lightroom "Classic," seems a shot across the bow, suggesting those of us who don't want to use cloud storage are anachronisms.

I'm ok with a subscription based payment scheme. Fine. But pressuring photographers to move images to the cloud or see an end to functionality and upgrades would be a bridge too far. I don't understand what motive, other than keeping cloud stored files as hostages, a company could have for heading in such a direction.

Given the option of cloud storage only or leave, I'll leave.

Scott
 

LDS

EOS 5D Mark IV
Sep 14, 2012
1,715
248
YuengLinger said:
I don't understand what motive, other than keeping cloud stored files as hostages, a company could have for heading in such a direction.

The same Google and Facebook have. User data processing and reselling for 'marketing' (for many different meaning of 'marketing') targeting. There's a lot of data actual 'AI' technologies can extract from photos. They need you to give them, though....
 

Quirkz

EOS RP
CR Pro
Oct 30, 2014
284
201
LDS said:
YuengLinger said:
I don't understand what motive, other than keeping cloud stored files as hostages, a company could have for heading in such a direction.

The same Google and Facebook have. User data processing and reselling for 'marketing' (for many different meaning of 'marketing') targeting. There's a lot of data actual 'AI' technologies can extract from photos. They need you to give them, though....

It’s more than that. To some of us, it’s a really useful feature. I transfer photos on my desktop Mac, later pick up where I left off on my laptop, and finally it’s great to review on my iPad, or share photos with family while sitting around the kitchen table. Seamless experience, no matter what device I use.

They’re moving in a direction of a new market that is opening up. Many of you don’t like the change, and that’s ok. I’m one of the other crowd that really likes some of what they’ve done. Time will tell whether they were right in this move, but looking at their currently increasing subscription base, they are doing what most of their customers want.

To be fair, there’s a lot about the new Lightroom I strongly dislike, and even the cloud features could be improved In significant ways. But they’re heading in a direction on offering a service where there is no competition. Pretty smart move.
 

LDS

EOS 5D Mark IV
Sep 14, 2012
1,715
248
Quirkz said:
It’s more than that. To some of us, it’s a really useful feature. I transfer photos on my desktop Mac, later pick up where I left off on my laptop, and finally it’s great to review on my iPad, or share photos with family while sitting around the kitchen table. Seamless experience, no matter what device I use.

That's one of the baits to get the photos. Client/server applications has been common in the past 25 years at least, when servers and their software became cheap enough. You don't really need a "cloud" for that. You just need the "server" part. Other sectors where teamwork is very important have been working across people and devices for years, well before the "cloud".

Adobe has and is strengthening a big "marketing" business - it has also a convention like Adobe Summit dedicated to that, and "marketing" today means profiling consumers and targeting them.

Why Microsoft too turned Windows 10 into a huge data gathering software? Just look at Facebook and Google revenues and profits. Others want a slice of the cake too, Adobe included, especially now there's the technology to extract useful information from images at relatively cheap costs.
 
<-- start Taboola -->