As I grow older....

For me, changing lenses is a pain and I prefer a standard zoom and telephoto zoom. I used to have one good digital body (first a 5D2 and now a 5D3) and a film body and an infrared body, plus other stuff (five EF lenses, a flash, a 1.4 extender, a couple EFS lenses for the infrared, etc).

It was too much to carry for only occasional use, so I just recently traded in the extra cameras and EFS lenses and the extender and flash (I can't remember the last time I used a flash). I traded it all for a second pro digital body (1D mkIV). On a quick trip last week I took 5D3 with standard zoom (L series) and 1D4 with telephoto zoom (L series). No changing lenses and I was in heaven.

I do have one prime for low light events, a Sigma 85 f1.4 (my only non Canon lens). It is nice to have when I need it, but most of the time I leave it at home.
 

dak723

EOS R
Oct 26, 2013
1,141
435
I'm not sure age has that much to do with it. Perhaps it is more about changing priorities as you age or get more experience. I come from an art background, so composition has always been a high priority - so I haven't used a prime lens since about 1995. It's all about the totality of the shot, so sharpness has never been a priority and I've done just fine with the zooms and non-L glass. Even sold my L glass when I saw that there was no discernible difference in my 8" x 12" prints (I rarely print larger) between the L glass and non-L. My best selling print was taken with the original 6MP digital rebel and 18-55mm kit lens, which is a constant reminder that so much of the advances with each new generation of cameras is mostly hype.
 

AcutancePhotography

EOS 5D Mark IV
May 8, 2013
1,853
1
Hector1970 said:
I wear gel pads on my knees as I've learn better landscape photographs are taken closer to the ground but kneeling is getting harder.
Kneeling ain't so bad, it is the getting up that get's harder. When I kneel for a photograph, I am gonna be there for a while. ;D
 

AlanF

Hands. Face. Space.
CR Pro
Aug 16, 2012
7,237
6,795
sanj said:
chauncey said:
I'm 73 y/o, have been into this insane hobby over 8 years and only shoot primes.
Am also heavy into PS CC....am anal retentive as to image quality.
I have been into this insane hobby over 35 years and when I was 8 years into it, I thought EXACTLY like you sir.
Young upstart! I have been into it for 60 years, and shoot with whatever is best for the purpose - and which I can carry and hold.
 

Mt Spokane Photography

I post too Much on Here!!
CR Pro
Mar 25, 2011
16,372
1,378
I've sold almost all my prime lenses in favor of zooms. I don't think its age related, I miss shots while changing lenses, so now I typically only have to change between 70-100 and 24-70. I'd buy another FF, but so far I've managed the one change when I needed it. Changing from 17 to 35 to 50 to 85 to 135 was just too much for theater photography where I want to isolate a actor, group of actors, or the whole stage. Sometimes the need to do that happens quickly.

I loved my 135mm L, but it got little use once I bought the zoom. I don't need wider than 24mm or longer than 200mm for this type of use.
 

unfocused

EOS-1D X Mark III
Jul 20, 2010
5,708
2,696
67
Springfield, IL
www.mgordoncommunications.com
I think the universal here is the desire to simplify things. It seems that with more experience many people come to the conclusion that the simpler the better. For some, that might mean zooms, for others it might be primes. For me, it's the challenge of reducing the image itself to its core – which if far harder than the choice of lens.
 

JPAZ

If only I knew what I was doing.....
CR Pro
Sep 8, 2012
957
51
I relate to just about everything said here. My usual travel "kit" weighs 15 to 16 pounds, depending on what I choose, and that load seems to be getting heavier and heavier. So the two issues are: 1) what's happening to me physically as I age (the thing I don't want to admit at times) and 2) what's happening to me philosophically. I spend more time just looking and watching than I once did. All too often, I used to get so involved in "getting the shot" that I'd miss "the moment." I was just recently at the base of a lovely waterfall. Some around me were climbing all over the rocks or laying in the pools, and gathering many wonderful angles and images. I did find a good spot and captured a few nice photos with a couple of lenses. But I spent more time just sitting and enjoying the setting. So this is what is happening as I age.

As far as my kit is concerned, I am trying to carry less, but am just not there, yet. FWIW, I have a friend who shoots M4/3. He gets some really nice images and his kit (body, EVF, 3 lenses) fits in the pockets of his coat. Makes me wonder..........
 

docsmith

EOS R
CR Pro
Sep 17, 2010
990
421
I get joy out of a number of different aspects of photography. That is why it is such a great hobby. I enjoy the technical aspects of the gear, I enjoy pixel peeping (sometimes), I enjoy post processing when I turn what I think is an ordinary shot into something I really like, but most of all, I enjoy being there, taking the picture, thinking about composition or even those moments right before I click the shutter when I am taking the scene in. To me, photography makes most things more interesting and also allow you to relive the event again.

So, as I get older...will some of that change? To an extent, I hope not. I can see de-emphasizing the gear, but I find what our gear does so miraculous, I'll likely always marvel at it somewhat. But I still marvel at flying on an airplane, which I do a couple times a month.

As for gear, I am mostly zooms (16-35 f/4 IS, 24-70 II, 70-200 II, 70-300L, and 150-600S) but I have to say that primes fill important niches that can really allow a lot of creativity. Mine include Rokinon 14 f/2.8, TSE 24 II, 50 Art, and 100 L macro.
 

old-pr-pix

EOS RP
Dec 26, 2011
413
56
While I can't quite match AlanF's 60 years, I'm well over 50 years into this game. Some days my G15 and "P" mode are all I need ["P" does stand for "professional" doesn't it?]. Other days it is a backpack full of stuff and all "M" mode. I must admit that my m4/3 gear is getting more and more use lately - it truly is smaller and lighter especially for telephoto where I'd likely want to crop anyway. With m4/3 I can carry both a wide aperture prime and a pancake zoom in my pocket. I still prefer the ergonomics of my Canon gear (those m4/3 buttons can be awfully tiny and close together -- shooting with gloves on can be challenging with m4/3).

Years ago, being an IQ snob, I shot mostly MF & LF film. I look back at some of the shots I though were great then and realize how excellent digital has become - even the smaller sensor sizes. Yet, I still like the look of TRI-X even when the grain is gravel sized from pushing it to ASA 1600.
 

AlanF

Hands. Face. Space.
CR Pro
Aug 16, 2012
7,237
6,795
old-pr-pix said:
While I can't quite match AlanF's 60 years, I'm well over 50 years into this game. Some days my G15 and "P" mode are all I need ["P" does stand for "professional" doesn't it?]. Other days it is a backpack full of stuff and all "M" mode. I must admit that my m4/3 gear is getting more and more use lately - it truly is smaller and lighter especially for telephoto where I'd likely want to crop anyway. With m4/3 I can carry both a wide aperture prime and a pancake zoom in my pocket. I still prefer the ergonomics of my Canon gear (those m4/3 buttons can be awfully tiny and close together -- shooting with gloves on can be challenging with m4/3).

Years ago, being an IQ snob, I shot mostly MF & LF film. I look back at some of the shots I though were great then and realize how excellent digital has become - even the smaller sensor sizes. Yet, I still like the look of TRI-X even when the grain is gravel sized from pushing it to ASA 1600.
The Canon M5 has Canon ergonomics and the size of m4/3 with the advantage of a larger sensor. You can have the best of both worlds.
 

SteveM

EOS 90D
Jun 29, 2016
138
0
30 yrs ago I shot with a bag full of primes, when you got too much dirt in the camera (Canon F1n) through changing lenses in the field, you'd take the lens off, hold the camera upside down and shake it out....well nearly anyway. A dirty sensor today is considerably more hassle and potentially damaging, so I put a lens on for the day and it stays on (usually the 24-105), a bit like a pair of trousers. I know what I'm going to shoot when I go out so I rarely have an issue. Some of today's zoom lenses are seriously sharp wide open such that sharpening in ps is almost not needed. Three examples, 24-70 f2.8 mkll; 70-200 f2.8 mkll and the 100-400 mkll. I've got a small selection of fast primes which I use when I have something very precise in mind, they rarely get used as the zooms are just so good and flexible.
 

ScottyP

EOS RP
Feb 18, 2012
799
3
Pennsylvania, USA
The list of f/2 zooms is not long.

I use a 35mm as my walk around. I just detest noise so I avoid high ISO. Leaving the 35 on the camera keeps me covered when I find myself going indoors. I find it galling to have to dial up ISO 3200 or ISO6400 or worse even on full frame if it could be avoided. If I printed most of my shots and I was looking at 5x7's or so all the time that would bother me less but when nearly everything you see is on a 32" monitor, high noise and low detail are really ugly. The 3 stops between f/1.4 and f/4 make an enormous difference.

I use the 70-200 for nearly everything else.
 

old-pr-pix

EOS RP
Dec 26, 2011
413
56
AlanF said:
old-pr-pix said:
While I can't quite match AlanF's 60 years, I'm well over 50 years into this game. Some days my G15 and "P" mode are all I need ["P" does stand for "professional" doesn't it?]. Other days it is a backpack full of stuff and all "M" mode. I must admit that my m4/3 gear is getting more and more use lately - it truly is smaller and lighter especially for telephoto where I'd likely want to crop anyway. With m4/3 I can carry both a wide aperture prime and a pancake zoom in my pocket. I still prefer the ergonomics of my Canon gear (those m4/3 buttons can be awfully tiny and close together -- shooting with gloves on can be challenging with m4/3)...
The Canon M5 has Canon ergonomics and the size of m4/3 with the advantage of a larger sensor. You can have the best of both worlds.
Good point. I really wanted to like the original M when it came out; but the autofocus was soooo slow even with v2 firmware. I guess that soured me on the M series for quite a while. I should give it another try. Only remaining issues may be: 1) I've since made significant investment in m4/3 bodies and glass and 2) the native lenses for M are still limited and comparatively large. Thanks to camerasize.com here are some 'equivalent' comparisons for m4/3 lenses I use (based on f-stop and focal length, not DOF - let's not get into what's really equivalent).
 

Attachments

sanj

EOS R5
Jan 22, 2012
3,620
478
Maximilian said:
sanj said:
As I grow older, getting the shot is becoming more of a priority than technical nit picking.
...
Does anyone else relate?
Hi Sanjay!

In short I'd say it that way (as a lot before): "The best camera is the one in your hand!"

Long version: it all depends on what you're shooting:
  • event, action, sport, wildlife, etc. photography requires the "getting the shot, getting the moment" approach, so versatile and fast gear (zoom, fps) should be preferred
  • if you have time or even the need to plan your shot you can also think about the best technical approach (which lens, which angle, best light, etc.)
  • and of course there is nothing more important than at least a decent usable sharp focus (except for some artsy work)

Personally I preferred zooms in the past while I now prefer a good mixture of both zoom and primes.
Yes Maximilian. Agree. I would need a prime only for real low light situation.
 

sanj

EOS R5
Jan 22, 2012
3,620
478
dak723 said:
I'm not sure age has that much to do with it. Perhaps it is more about changing priorities as you age or get more experience. I come from an art background, so composition has always been a high priority - so I haven't used a prime lens since about 1995. It's all about the totality of the shot, so sharpness has never been a priority and I've done just fine with the zooms and non-L glass. Even sold my L glass when I saw that there was no discernible difference in my 8" x 12" prints (I rarely print larger) between the L glass and non-L. My best selling print was taken with the original 6MP digital rebel and 18-55mm kit lens, which is a constant reminder that so much of the advances with each new generation of cameras is mostly hype.
By age I meant "photographic age". :) :)

And yes, it is the totally of the shot, which I am leaning towards.
And that does not mean 'compromise'.
 

sanj

EOS R5
Jan 22, 2012
3,620
478
ScottyP said:
The list of f/2 zooms is not long.

I use a 35mm as my walk around. I just detest noise so I avoid high ISO. Leaving the 35 on the camera keeps me covered when I find myself going indoors. I find it galling to have to dial up ISO 3200 or ISO6400 or worse even on full frame if it could be avoided. If I printed most of my shots and I was looking at 5x7's or so all the time that would bother me less but when nearly everything you see is on a 32" monitor, high noise and low detail are really ugly. The 3 stops between f/1.4 and f/4 make an enormous difference.

I use the 70-200 for nearly everything else.
Scotty. Are you using full frame or crop sensor? I find the grain on my new Canon full frame absolutely acceptable at 3200. But your standards may be different. But to me, especially when prints are made, I can't see the high ISO grains. Not one bit.
 

sanj

EOS R5
Jan 22, 2012
3,620
478
docsmith said:
I get joy out of a number of different aspects of photography. That is why it is such a great hobby. I enjoy the technical aspects of the gear, I enjoy pixel peeping (sometimes), I enjoy post processing when I turn what I think is an ordinary shot into something I really like, but most of all, I enjoy being there, taking the picture, thinking about composition or even those moments right before I click the shutter when I am taking the scene in. To me, photography makes most things more interesting and also allow you to relive the event again.

So, as I get older...will some of that change? To an extent, I hope not. I can see de-emphasizing the gear, but I find what our gear does so miraculous, I'll likely always marvel at it somewhat. But I still marvel at flying on an airplane, which I do a couple times a month.

As for gear, I am mostly zooms (16-35 f/4 IS, 24-70 II, 70-200 II, 70-300L, and 150-600S) but I have to say that primes fill important niches that can really allow a lot of creativity. Mine include Rokinon 14 f/2.8, TSE 24 II, 50 Art, and 100 L macro.
Poetry
 

ScottyP

EOS RP
Feb 18, 2012
799
3
Pennsylvania, USA
sanj said:
ScottyP said:
The list of f/2 zooms is not long.

I use a 35mm as my walk around. I just detest noise so I avoid high ISO. Leaving the 35 on the camera keeps me covered when I find myself going indoors. I find it galling to have to dial up ISO 3200 or ISO6400 or worse even on full frame if it could be avoided. If I printed most of my shots and I was looking at 5x7's or so all the time that would bother me less but when nearly everything you see is on a 32" monitor, high noise and low detail are really ugly. The 3 stops between f/1.4 and f/4 make an enormous difference.

I use the 70-200 for nearly everything else.
Scotty. Are you using full frame or crop sensor? I find the grain on my new Canon full frame absolutely acceptable at 3200. But your standards may be different. But to me, especially when prints are made, I can't see the high ISO grains. Not one bit.
I'm on full frame. ISO 3200 can work. A stop higher and it gets worse. Also I'm not so much talking about noise and grain as the loss of fine detail in eyelashes and so on. Most especially if you have to crop the image at all.

I suppose you could list tight framing ease in the plus column for zooms though.