Battery Life and heat issue shooting stills.

wyotex43n

EOS M50
Jan 24, 2016
49
36
When someone has real world data on the battery life on an R5 let me know. I am more concerned about battery life than overheating.
Has anyone heard of an issue with overheating while shooting stills? That would be a real issue for me.
 

tpatana

EOS 5D Mark IV
Nov 1, 2012
1,540
265
I've been wondering same. My sport shooting is often 8+ hours and 4000-6000 clicks. With R5, I might add occasional video too. At this point I'm hoping/guessing about 2h/1000 clicks per battery, meaning I need to carry minimum 4 batteries. Maybe survive with 3 (or 2 if desperate) if there's place to charge others while shooting.
 

davidhfe

EOS RP
Sep 9, 2015
303
447
I've been wondering same. My sport shooting is often 8+ hours and 4000-6000 clicks. With R5, I might add occasional video too. At this point I'm hoping/guessing about 2h/1000 clicks per battery, meaning I need to carry minimum 4 batteries. Maybe survive with 3 (or 2 if desperate) if there's place to charge others while shooting.
My 5D4 with the 100-400 and heavy IS use typically eats 2-3 batteries during a day of shooting sports. I'm expecting to wind up needing double that, though I should be clear I'm an amateur. I think the grip will be a required accessory for sports and wildlife.

Edit: On the overheating side, even when it says 0min of 4K HQ you can still take pictures. Would like to see some comments on if the FPS drops in that case.
 

tpatana

EOS 5D Mark IV
Nov 1, 2012
1,540
265
My 5D4 with the 100-400 and heavy IS use typically eats 2-3 batteries during a day of shooting sports. I'm expecting to wind up needing double that, though I should be clear I'm an amateur. I think the grip will be a required accessory for sports and wildlife.
My experience with 5D4 and 70-200 w/ IS is that the 8h/5000clicks is doable (I have grip and 2 batteries), although towards the end it'll be quite low. I try to charge a bit during some of the breaks to help. 1DX with 70-200 IS has no trouble making that with single (bigger) battery, although I carry second one just in case. Can't miss those final matches due to battery.

For R5 I'll get grip for sure, question is how many extra batteries beyond the first 2. Good combo would be total 4, so the first two should last first 4 hours, and then finish with the other set. If they seem to be on the edge, make sure to charge the first set while shooting with second, so there's chance to swap again if needed.

If want to save some money, go with 3 batteries and rotate them to charger as go but that'd be more hassle. Bring 2 chargers and always charging 2 of them and keep on in the body (even with grip double slot) might be the best option if going with 3 batteries. I guess you could try to do that with only 2 batteries too, charge one while shooting other, but that's getting to the danger zone.
 

AlanF

Hands. Face. Space.
CR Pro
Aug 16, 2012
7,248
6,844
My 5D4 with the 100-400 and heavy IS use typically eats 2-3 batteries during a day of shooting sports. I'm expecting to wind up needing double that, though I should be clear I'm an amateur. I think the grip will be a required accessory for sports and wildlife.

Edit: On the overheating side, even when it says 0min of 4K HQ you can still take pictures. Would like to see some comments on if the FPS drops in that case.
I find the high battery drain with the 5DIV and 100-400mm II.
 

wyotex43n

EOS M50
Jan 24, 2016
49
36
I've been wondering same. My sport shooting is often 8+ hours and 4000-6000 clicks. With R5, I might add occasional video too. At this point I'm hoping/guessing about 2h/1000 clicks per battery, meaning I need to carry minimum 4 batteries. Maybe survive with 3 (or 2 if desperate) if there's place to charge others while shooting.
I am more of a wildlife shooter, So lots of viewfinder watching while waiting for something to happen. A typical 4 hours for me is 100-500 shots. Even with me hitting the AF ON regularly and causing the image stabilizer and meter to come on I can get a whole day in on my 7dmkll.
 

wyotex43n

EOS M50
Jan 24, 2016
49
36
My experience with 5D4 and 70-200 w/ IS is that the 8h/5000clicks is doable (I have grip and 2 batteries), although towards the end it'll be quite low. I try to charge a bit during some of the breaks to help. 1DX with 70-200 IS has no trouble making that with single (bigger) battery, although I carry second one just in case. Can't miss those final matches due to battery.

For R5 I'll get grip for sure, question is how many extra batteries beyond the first 2. Good combo would be total 4, so the first two should last first 4 hours, and then finish with the other set. If they seem to be on the edge, make sure to charge the first set while shooting with second, so there's chance to swap again if needed.

If want to save some money, go with 3 batteries and rotate them to charger as go but that'd be more hassle. Bring 2 chargers and always charging 2 of them and keep on in the body (even with grip double slot) might be the best option if going with 3 batteries. I guess you could try to do that with only 2 batteries too, charge one while shooting other, but that's getting to the danger zone.
4 hours of heavy use on two batteries would be ok for me. As I mentioned to the other person I shoot mostly wildlife. Lots of viewfinder time.
 

Mt Spokane Photography

I post too Much on Here!!
CR Pro
Mar 25, 2011
16,388
1,396
My experience with 5D4 and 70-200 w/ IS is that the 8h/5000clicks is doable (I have grip and 2 batteries), although towards the end it'll be quite low. I try to charge a bit during some of the breaks to help. 1DX with 70-200 IS has no trouble making that with single (bigger) battery, although I carry second one just in case. Can't miss those final matches due to battery.

For R5 I'll get grip for sure, question is how many extra batteries beyond the first 2. Good combo would be total 4, so the first two should last first 4 hours, and then finish with the other set. If they seem to be on the edge, make sure to charge the first set while shooting with second, so there's chance to swap again if needed.

If want to save some money, go with 3 batteries and rotate them to charger as go but that'd be more hassle. Bring 2 chargers and always charging 2 of them and keep on in the body (even with grip double slot) might be the best option if going with 3 batteries. I guess you could try to do that with only 2 batteries too, charge one while shooting other, but that's getting to the danger zone.
When I really need a long term battery, I have a Case Relay. It will connect to the camera with a dummy battery, and can be powered with usb from a AC adaptor, or a large USB Battery. That way, I can have the capacity of several standard Canon batteries. I've used the Case relay on several of my canon bodies, I even used it on my SL2 with a appropriate battery adapter.

Its a pain to find a way to keep the big USB battery close to the camera, putting it in my pocket usually works with a 4 ft cord to the adapter in the camera. Just another way to solve the multi battery issue.
 

unfocused

EOS-1D X Mark III
Jul 20, 2010
5,711
2,704
67
Springfield, IL
www.mgordoncommunications.com
Based on my experience with the R, I would say a battery grip is not an optional accessory, but a requirement.

This video has been linked elsewhere, but I'm highlighting the spot where she talks about battery life. Some of the problem may be related to driving the big white autofocus, but it does give an idea of what to expect. Please no hating on Chelsea, she has enough problems married to Tony.

 

H. Jones

Photojournalist
Aug 1, 2014
447
616
Even the 1DX mark II is rated to 260 shots on the LCD by CIPA and 1210 in the viewfinder. I routinely hit 8000+ shot counts on a battery in the 1DX mark II, and 5000+ even when mixing in some video.

The biggest thing to remember is that when shooting sports, a lot of these photos are in bursts, not in the weird slow drain methods CIPA uses which are way off actual use. Bursts don't particularly use a lot of battery and easily get the shutter count up there.

My full time job has an EOS R in our gear closet and I really can't say I've had much if any issue with it in the year we've had it. I've easily gotten to 1500+ shot counts on an LP-E6N during heavy shooting assignments and sports with it. I've had to change to a second battery with the EOS R a few times during a long day of several shoots without stopping, but most of the time I just make a mental note to swap to a fresh battery after every assignment to keep things at 100%, and that's never caused me any problems.
 
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Feb 15, 2020
345
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Even the 1DX mark II is rated to 260 shots on the LCD by CIPA and 1210 in the viewfinder. I routinely hit 8000+ shot counts on a battery in the 1DX mark II, and 5000+ even when mixing in some video.

The biggest thing to remember is that when shooting sports, a lot of these photos are in bursts, not in the weird slow drain methods CIPA uses which are way off actual use. Bursts don't particularly use a lot of battery and easily get the shutter count up there.

My full time job has an EOS R in our gear closet and I really can't say I've had much if any issue with it in the year we've had it. I've easily gotten to 1500+ shot counts on an LP-E6N during heavy shooting assignments and sports with it. I've had to change to a second battery with the EOS R a few times during a long day of several shoots without stopping, but most of the time I just make a mental note to swap to a fresh battery after every assignment to keep things at 100%, and that's never caused me any problems.
I have had a similar experience with my EOS R.. I have shot 2200 images with 2 batteries in the battery grip and they were showing as half full at the end of the day. Even if the R5 gets 500 less shots than that, it would be fine for me.
 
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mkamelg

EOS 5DS R
Feb 1, 2015
37
17
I wrote these words August 2, 2020.

I wonder if R5 and R6 are insensitive to DOFBOD (DOF Button Of Death). I coined the term (DOFBOD) myself. It may sound a bit too serious, but I had to come up with something. I created some video posted below for our Polish CPS (don't worry, I included English subtitles), as the saying goes one picture for a thousand words:


Probably all cameras with same DOF button location (5DS/R, 5D Mark IV, 5D Mark III, 7D Mark II) are affected, definitely 5DS R (which I am currently using, I bought it in May from the gray market) and 5DS (I have used this camera in years 2015-2019, I bought it from an official distribution source in my country).

The solutions to the problem are simple.

1. Before putting the camera in your bag, turn it off with the physical switch. Which of course could be a problem, if you want to have in your bag camera ready to wake up quickly.

Unfortunately, this may not help 1D X Mark III users, by quoting https://www.optyczne.pl/445.2-Test_aparatu-Canon_EOS-1D_X_Mark_III_Budowa__jakość_wykonania_i_funkcjonalność.html "One of the buttons (the one with the flat surface) is the standard depth-of-field preview, and the other is the M-Fn2 function button. It is worth adding that the pair of buttons intended for the vertical handle remain active, even if the switch mentioned earlier is in the OFF position."

2. Do not put your camera in the size known from the 5d series or bigger in the Lowepro Passport Sling III bag (it's my everyday bag), with replaced interior (I have been using the Ape Case Cubeze (sorry but I don't remember what number) storage bag for many years) as I do.

3. When it comes to currently produced full-frame Canon cameras, buy yourself R, Ra, RP or 6D Mark II.

It's August 3, 2020 and I just got a reply from our Polish CPS:

A button that has no assigned function is still functional, and if pressed prevents the camera from sleeping. This is the correct operation of the equipment.
Thanks to you Canon, it's a pity that you didn't draw the conclusion from the negative lesson that Nikon gave its users well over 17 (sic!) years ago, that is when this post was published https://www.photo.net/discuss/threads/nikon-n80-eats-batteries.49504/#post-821784
 

tpatana

EOS 5D Mark IV
Nov 1, 2012
1,540
265
For people who don't want to watch 9 minute polish video, could you tell what is the problem? You managed to write surprisingly long post with 3 solutions, but I still don't know what it the problem.
 
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mkamelg

EOS 5DS R
Feb 1, 2015
37
17
I don't like lecturing people on a daily basis, but here I have to make an exception.


Polish, not polish.

In the greatest short. The problem is, that if you put the camera in the bag before it goes to sleep (the upper display will be active), and the DOF preview button is pressed by one of the dividers in the bag, the camera will not goes to sleep. If you forget yourself and close the bag tightly, in a few hours (say four) you can take the hot camera out of it, with the battery almost fully discharged or even completely discharged.
 

BeenThere

EOS R
CR Pro
Sep 4, 2012
1,213
636
Eastern Shore
When I really need a long term battery, I have a Case Relay. It will connect to the camera with a dummy battery, and can be powered with usb from a AC adaptor, or a large USB Battery. That way, I can have the capacity of several standard Canon batteries. I've used the Case relay on several of my canon bodies, I even used it on my SL2 with a appropriate battery adapter.

Its a pain to find a way to keep the big USB battery close to the camera, putting it in my pocket usually works with a 4 ft cord to the adapter in the camera. Just another way to solve the multi battery issue.
Do you have to keep the battery door open for the wire to exit?
 

tpatana

EOS 5D Mark IV
Nov 1, 2012
1,540
265
I don't like lecturing people on a daily basis, but here I have to make an exception.


Polish, not polish.
Sorry for speaking 5 languages, and in my native one we don't capitalize language names.
 

cornieleous

5D4 + R5
Jul 13, 2020
208
735
Do you have to keep the battery door open for the wire to exit?

No, there is a rubber flap/piece on all Canon battery doors for a dummy battery wire. Hard to spot but it is there. Canon sells their own LP-E6 dummy battery and AC to DC supply, but it is really over priced.

I had a Case Relay too but it was very over priced and uses the same cheap dummy battery (exact same) you can buy for 20 bucks on Amazon, and it failed me any time I used it below 40 degrees or up above 12kft. I might have had a bad unit but their support was terrible when contacted, and said it could not do what I wanted even though their spec sheet said it was more than capable. Next, I got a dummy battery and made my own 8.2V regulator circuit for about 10 bucks that works better and has higher gauge wire. I use this for 8+ hours of high current shooting (time lapse in cold temps and high altitudes).

Lots of options if a battery grip is not enough for you is the bottom line, but you might have to put it together yourself.