Black Friday sales for Canon

Nov 11, 2021
5
2
Just out of curiosity, I was doing some research on polycarbonate, and came across this forum discussion regarding the use of aluminum vs polycarbonate for "bot wars" construction, and polycarbonate seems to be the clear recommendation. Not sure how that translates to lens mounts, but if it is better at surviving a robot-to-robot collision, then maybe there is some truth to it :D

I'd definitely prefer polycarbonate over aluminum or any metal in some situations. For instance, I'm fine with the Canon RP using a plastic body. It's lighter and provides better bump protection.

I just always imagine tiny little black plastic shavings that get onto the sensor from the continuous mount and unmount of plastic mount lenses. But who knows, maybe metal on metal creates more shavings, and there is actually more risk of scratching your sensor when cleaning.

I think there were some Canon rebels where both the camera and the kit lens used plastic mounts. I wonder how well they've held up.
 

ulrichsd

I'm New Here
Nov 4, 2021
13
2
I have two plastic mount lenses for my micro 4/3 cameras. They seem fine. I think they weigh about 100 grams though. They mount much more smoothly than metal on metal for sure.

I personally prefer metal mounts even if attached to plastic mount points.

It's just that when I see a lens with a plastic mount, I feel like the company is making a deliberate effort to cut as many corners as possible. It may not be true, and in fact they may just want to get the word out that plastic lens mounts are better than metal. Nikon has been trying since the E series lenses from the 70s and 80s.

Yeah, I 100% agree, it just looks cheaper. It is like the fake wine corks, winemakers say they are better for the wine, but it doesn't matter, I want real cork LOL

I'm not sure if Nikon is pushing that they are better, just sharing what I received from Thom, who is a Nikon enthusiast but not on the Nikon payroll :)

I officially ordered my Z6, 24-70 and FTZ adapter, and they are coming Wednesday!
 

ulrichsd

I'm New Here
Nov 4, 2021
13
2
I just always imagine tiny little black plastic shavings that get onto the sensor from the continuous mount and unmount of plastic mount lenses. But who knows, maybe metal on metal creates more shavings, and there is actually more risk of scratching your sensor when cleaning.
That is funny, I thought the same thing and had asked the same question: "I was just concerned that plastic against metal would leave a bunch of small bits of plastic shavings on the sensor over time"

To which, I received the reply:
"Actually, what most of us have discovered is that metal mounts leave small bits of metal that can get to the mirrorbox or sensor on DSLRs ;~). Just the opposite of your fear."

I guess that the 18-55 dx kit lenses are polycarbonate mounts as well, but I've never owned one, I bought my cameras body-only. so I've never actually owned a plastic mount lens :D
 

neuroanatomist

I post too Much on Here!!
CR Pro
Jul 21, 2010
26,401
5,163
I guess that the 18-55 dx kit lenses are polycarbonate mounts as well, but I've never owned one, I bought my cameras body-only. so I've never actually owned a plastic mount lens :D
I own a few – several of the EF-M lenses have plastic mounts.