Black Rapid Backpack Strap

mnclayshooter

I love shooting - clay pigeons and photos!
Oct 28, 2013
314
0
Minnesota, USA
I just got back from two hiking adventures... of course the "gear" went with. The first was a week of hiking in Rocky Mountain National Park, and the second was a long weekend of hiking along Minnesota's North Shore of Lake Superior along the Superior Hiking Trail and some of it's spur trails which lead to waterfalls etc.

I used my BR sport strap exclusively on both trips.

I just saw this --> http://www.blackrapid.com/products/backpack-strap <--
advertised on BR's website and am wondering if anyone has seen it in person or possibly used one? I think they're very new (released 9/15/14???) so I understand if nobody has seen one, but hoping someone has seen one at a trade show or possibly had a chance to preview one etc. Anyone??? anyone??

It seems like if it works the way it shows, it would be ideal for my type of adventuring! It would allow some great flexibility for carrying either a DSLR backpack or for my use - probably a hydration/food/camping pack while still allowing all of the flexibility of a sling strap.
 

RustyTheGeek

EOS 5D Mark IV
Apr 27, 2011
1,631
4
55
DFW
rustythegeek.zenfolio.com
I can relate. I am always on the lookout for a better way to carry a decent DSLR while hiking.

The BR strap thing you link to seems to me to allow too much swinging. When I hike, I try to minimize that and keep things closer to me. I walk around with a smaller daypack quite often and having a regular strap like the BR strap under the daypack straps is not a problem at all. (But that is totally different than more serious heavy expedition pack hiking.)

IMHO, this new BR strap attached to the daypack straps product is sort of an answer to a problem that doesn't exist. (At least not for me.) But everyone is different.
 

dcm

It's not the gear. But it helps.
CR Pro
Apr 18, 2013
919
428
Colorado, USA
My BR straps didn't work well with a backpack so I had already picked up the SunSniper back pack strap, http://www.sun-sniper.com/en/the-back-pack-strap-495.html. It is pretty robust with metal caribiners, a "shock absorber", and metal cable to deter theft. BR's strap is a simpler version which would probably be fine on the trail depending on pack and hiking style. Too bad they didn't release it sooner.

I use a strap mostly for safety and convenience on the trail when I stop to shoot. I don't like the camera bouncing around or interfering with my trekking poles so I'm now using the Peak Design Capture Pro to anchor the camera to my strap when I'm not shooting and the Peak Design leash as my safety/convenience strap. Or I set the camer in the pack to get it out of the way when the hiking gets a bit more involved.
 

NancyP

EOS R
Dec 17, 2013
1,297
14
Cotton Carrier vest (backpack compatible) - I love this item. CC also has a backpack strap attachment that allows you to mount the camera to the backpack strap, but I would think that is more for compacts. The vest allows me to carry a DSLR with 180mm f/3.5L or 400 f/5.6L mounted, its weight near my center of gravity, the camera not flopping around, both of my hands free for hiking poles, scrambling, etc. Now G-d forbid I should trip and fall on my chest - but there are risks with any highly accessible carrying system.
 

RustyTheGeek

EOS 5D Mark IV
Apr 27, 2011
1,631
4
55
DFW
rustythegeek.zenfolio.com
NancyP said:
Cotton Carrier vest (backpack compatible) - I love this item. CC also has a backpack strap attachment that allows you to mount the camera to the backpack strap, but I would think that is more for compacts. The vest allows me to carry a DSLR with 180mm f/3.5L or 400 f/5.6L mounted, its weight near my center of gravity, the camera not flopping around, both of my hands free for hiking poles, scrambling, etc. Now G-d forbid I should trip and fall on my chest - but there are risks with any highly accessible carrying system.

Yeah, I prefer the CC system with the weight near my chest. And I have a CC vest but it's a bit 'overkill' for me, having all that extra vest/gear/weight to keep up with. And I don't totally love the 90 degree rotation required to put the camera on and off. If I plan to carry a large/heavy body and lens, the CC system is great. But since I try to carry something smaller and lighter like the SL1, I rigged up my own custom super magnet harness off the back pack straps with built in strain relief that didn't weigh as much and was somewhat simpler. I even use the same super magnet idea for hanging/attaching my trekking poles to my pack.
 

lion rock

EOS 5D Mark IV
Jan 1, 2013
1,920
37
I, too, have the SunSniper strap, bought it so I could hang my camera from my camera bag, and feel secure because of the steel cables inside the strap.
I really didn't like it too much at all. If I need to get gear out of my bag, I need to unhook the SunSniper from the bag. Just not convenient whatsoever. And the camera has to be put somewhere.
The strap is definitely very well made, strong and secure. I also love the ball bearing connector of the SunSniper design to the camera body, best design. I bought one such connector just to put on the Black Rapid strap, so that no amount of twisting could loosen the 1/4 inch screw connected to the camera.
 

pwp

EOS R6
Oct 25, 2010
2,530
23
I know at times I sound like a Peak Design shareholder which I'm not, but I am an unashamed advocate.
https://peakdesign.com/

Having tried just about everything in all sorts of work, travel, hiking scenarios, Peak Design has pushed aside not just the body-busting original neck-straps, but Spider-Pro system, Carry-Speed (murdered by the enthusiastically litigious Black Rapid) and Black Rapid themselves. Their products lend themselves to the precision and demands of extreme sports all the way to the corporate boardroom.

-pw
 

kirkcha

EOS M6 Mark II
Jan 17, 2013
79
0
pwp said:
I know at times I sound like a Peak Design shareholder which I'm not, but I am an unashamed advocate.
https://peakdesign.com/

I have also been using the Peak Capture Pro on a backpack for hiking for a few months. Really like how stable the camera is while scrambling up and down hills, even with a 70-300 L on it.

https://peakdesign.com/store/image/cache/data/Capture%20v2/capturepro-480x480.jpg
 

Lloyd

EOS 90D
I use this with my 60D with a small lens. http://optechusa.com/reporter-backpack.html It is a cheap light weight option. I wouldn't want a big camera and lens bouncing around my neck, but for a smaller rig it works fine. For the bigger stuff I replaced my backpack belt for a think tank belt and holsters.
 

transpo1

EOS RP
Jan 12, 2011
758
104
It's a cool idea but I wouldn't buy this for the reason that I like to keep my BlackRapid RS-7 separate and put it on underneath my F-Stop Guru backpack. That way, I can still take my backpack off and keep the BR strap w/5DIII securely on my body while taking out a new lens.

If I had to take the camera off before removing the backpack, it would defeat the purpose and be awkward. My two cents :)
 

mnclayshooter

I love shooting - clay pigeons and photos!
Oct 28, 2013
314
0
Minnesota, USA
pwp said:
I know at times I sound like a Peak Design shareholder which I'm not, but I am an unashamed advocate.
https://peakdesign.com/

Having tried just about everything in all sorts of work, travel, hiking scenarios, Peak Design has pushed aside not just the body-busting original neck-straps, but Spider-Pro system, Carry-Speed (murdered by the enthusiastically litigious Black Rapid) and Black Rapid themselves. Their products lend themselves to the precision and demands of extreme sports all the way to the corporate boardroom.

-pw


Thanks for the pointer here! We crossed paths with a guy climbing the same waterfall that we were on and he had his cameras strapped to his pack straps. I wasn't sure who's product it was and I was too tired to stop and ask the guy. This is exactly what he had.... https://peakdesign.com/store/?c=bundles Looked to me like he had his hands free, cameras quickly accessible and close to his body... I find myself constantly holding the camera even on the BR strap. Doesn't leave me a lot of latitude for trekking poles.

Thanks for the pointer!

Hmmm... now this has me thinking...
 

Steve

EOS RP
Nov 4, 2013
351
0
NancyP said:
Cotton Carrier vest (backpack compatible) - I love this item.

That looks super dorky but I gotta say, I would have loved something like this on a recent backpacking trip. It was a really uncomfortable slog carrying my gear up and down a mountain with a full sized pack, trying to keep the camera from swinging all over the place. I somehow ground out a spot on the top plate of my camera where it must have been rubbing on something the whole way down. You think it could hold a 1D + 300 2.8?
 

mnclayshooter

I love shooting - clay pigeons and photos!
Oct 28, 2013
314
0
Minnesota, USA
Sorry for digging up an old thread... but I'm now getting around to pulling the trigger and getting a couple of the Peak Design CapturePRO's for my backpack.

Those of you who use them, do you use a safety tether as well? Any recommendations?

I was just going to order the Peak Design wrist strap along with it and use it on the camera body with the loop going around my backpack strap as a safety feature I figured I could manipulate it enough that it would have enough slack to get up to my face right where I want it still but also because of the quick-release on the strap, I could get it off and lower down to the ground etc if desired for different shooting angles.

Thoughts are appreciated.
 

dcm

It's not the gear. But it helps.
CR Pro
Apr 18, 2013
919
428
Colorado, USA
mnclayshooter said:
Sorry for digging up an old thread... but I'm now getting around to pulling the trigger and getting a couple of the Peak Design CapturePRO's for my backpack.

Those of you who use them, do you use a safety tether as well? Any recommendations?

I was just going to order the Peak Design wrist strap along with it and use it on the camera body with the loop going around my backpack strap as a safety feature I figured I could manipulate it enough that it would have enough slack to get up to my face right where I want it still but also because of the quick-release on the strap, I could get it off and lower down to the ground etc if desired for different shooting angles.

Thoughts are appreciated.

I use the Capture Pro on my pack strap (18L, 30L, 45L) for an EOS M and it works well. I found the wrist strap didn't really work for me, except as a wrist strap. I found the leash strap to be more flexible as a neck strap / safety strap. I usually use it like a normal neck strap, but looped through the carry handle at the top of my pack to take any load off my neck. This helps when I need my hands for a minute and don't want to set the camera down or park it in the Capture Pro. I park it whenever I begin moving again. The leash strap can be lengthened or easily removed, same as the wrist strap (but you have 2 connections). The leash can also be used with a single camera connection with a large adjustable loop (a big wrist strap), I just haven't tried that configuration yet.
 

mnclayshooter

I love shooting - clay pigeons and photos!
Oct 28, 2013
314
0
Minnesota, USA
dcm said:
mnclayshooter said:
Sorry for digging up an old thread... but I'm now getting around to pulling the trigger and getting a couple of the Peak Design CapturePRO's for my backpack.

Those of you who use them, do you use a safety tether as well? Any recommendations?

I was just going to order the Peak Design wrist strap along with it and use it on the camera body with the loop going around my backpack strap as a safety feature I figured I could manipulate it enough that it would have enough slack to get up to my face right where I want it still but also because of the quick-release on the strap, I could get it off and lower down to the ground etc if desired for different shooting angles.

Thoughts are appreciated.

I use the Capture Pro on my pack strap (18L, 30L, 45L) for an EOS M and it works well. I found the wrist strap didn't really work for me, except as a wrist strap. I found the leash strap to be more flexible as a neck strap / safety strap. I usually use it like a normal neck strap, but looped through the carry handle at the top of my pack to take any load off my neck. This helps when I need my hands for a minute and don't want to set the camera down or park it in the Capture Pro. I park it whenever I begin moving again. The leash strap can be lengthened or easily removed, same as the wrist strap (but you have 2 connections). The leash can also be used with a single camera connection with a large adjustable loop (a big wrist strap), I just haven't tried that configuration yet.

Here's the setup I'm likely going to go with:

6D with either 24-105 or my 17-35Tamron or my 14mm Rokinon on mounted on the right strap (I'm right handed) and have the arca plate on the 100-400's tripod collar with body cap etc on the left strap. (not sure about this one yet... might carry the lens inside the pack... it is kinda big, after all.... I just want to have relatively fast access to it.

Right now, my method is to have the 100-400 mounted and hanging on the end of my BR sling and have my wide or ultrawide in my pocket. I find myself using my right hand to take the weight off of the strap and because of my own insecurity about dropping it or tripping/falling etc or having it swinging around and banging into things, including my hip/thigh. This not only takes one hand out of operation for stability purposes but also makes walking awkward and more fatigue-inducing over longer distances. I also rationalized that I'm far more likely to want to shoot a faster-moving subject with the 100-400 (bird, deer, marmot, squirrel etc etc) and the wide angle is more likely going to be for a still-subject (a vista/landscape or a group photo etc), therefore the preference for keeping the zoom mounted.

I'm a little torn. I love carrying the wider range of lenses (a wide or ultrawide and a longer zoom) so I can capture what I want, wherever I want. I just want to find the "right way" for me to carry them. The BR strap isn't terrible. I actually quite like it when I'm not in an aggressive climbing situation or wearing a hydration or other pack - for example, when simply out walking a trail that doesn't have a lot of obstacles or scrambling challenges. But once I get into a climbing situation or longer/more strenuous hike/climb something where trekking poles or free hands would really benefit me, I like having the camera very securely attached/stowed somewhere. Currently, my strategy is to take my coat off... put the sling back on, and then tuck the camera along my back under my coat and set the strap stops to keep it relatively centered on my back... It sucks. I'm not going to lie. But, so far, it's kept everything safe and sound while scaling what was one of the scariest things I've climbed - the flank of a partially iced over water fall... those rocks get slippery and you never really know if you're stepping into a pocket of gravel that has ice in it, or super cold water.

That's where having the capturePRO and a safety tether come in. ORRR.... if Canon/Tamron/Sigma ever come out with a 14-400+ lens... I'm all set. 8)

I've ordered the CapturePRO's... we'll see how they work first hand when they get here next week. Hopefully it gets a little warmer here in MN so I can go out and really put them to the test! I suppose hiking on icy/snowy trails would probably qualify as a rigorous test though. ;D
 

candc

EOS R
Sep 22, 2013
1,264
8
Wautoma, WI USA.
I have a br sport and a br back pack strap. The backpack strap is fantastic. It clips to your d ring and on a low point. If you clip both to the same side you can rotate your pack around to the front with everything still attached. The strap adjuster works great too.
 

FTb-n

Canonet QL17 GIII
Sep 22, 2012
533
8
St. Paul, MN
I use two standard Capture Clips for two 5D3 bodies, one with a 70-200 f2.8L II and the other with a 24-70 f2.8L II. I do not use a tether strap. Recently, I switched the clip to a 7D body and was impressed at how it remained secure on the 5D3. I do, periodically, make sure the clip is still tight and have never had it loosen up.

The mount that secures to a strap or belt, however, should be checked periodically. I'm in the habit of double-checking the thumb screws. Sometimes, they aren't tight, but have never really loosened up.
 

mnclayshooter

I love shooting - clay pigeons and photos!
Oct 28, 2013
314
0
Minnesota, USA
Okay - let me ask you this... Do you think that putting a lens (on a tripod ring/foot like the 100-400) into the capture clip even makes sense... maybe I'm over thinking it. I will have 2 clips coming next week. I'll do some testing... maybe I'll have one clip for sale. ;D
 

FTb-n

Canonet QL17 GIII
Sep 22, 2012
533
8
St. Paul, MN
mnclayshooter said:
Okay - let me ask you this... Do you think that putting a lens (on a tripod ring/foot like the 100-400) into the capture clip even makes sense... maybe I'm over thinking it. I will have 2 clips coming next week. I'll do some testing... maybe I'll have one clip for sale. ;D
Good question. I use the collar on my 70-200 with a monopod for figure skating, so I keep a Manfrotto clip in it. Generally, however, I prefer to leave the collar home. I suspect the clip on the body will work better. The lens collar may be too centered weight-wise and prone to swinging.
 
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