Canon has released an interactive brochure for the Canon EOS R3

lawny13

EOS 90D
Mar 6, 2019
102
73
I also think every old hotshoe equipemnt should mount directly to the R3, albeit without (perfect) weather sealing.

I think the smaller size of the ST-E10 over the ST-E3-RT is worth the purchase alone. The R3 with the mounted ST-E10 will fit more easily into my bag, and this is great. Weight is a minor issue, but the fact that the ST-E10 doesn't need batteries to operate is another plus in the convenience category.

Additionally the ST-E10 is much cheaper than the ST-E3-RT, so it is not tooo heavy an investment.

I also almost never use flashes mounted directly to the hot shoe, and even less so in rain. With GPS built in, there is also no need for the GPS-E2-receiver (which I do use in rain), so I think there is very little need for the hot shoe adapter.
regarding the battery… it may be convenient for obvious reasons, but canon still doesn’t match sony when it comes to battery life. So I’m that respect having the flash draw power out of the camera’s battery is also inconvenient.

battery performance has generally been my main issue with canon. Even in the Nikon vs canon heydays it nikon always did better than canon regarding battery life. Now with MILC it is even more important for canon to actually turn their attention to that and make some major improvements.

I love my R5. But if I am birding and literally waiting for long periods of time for a shot I do worry about battery drainage. That was never really an issue when I was shooting the A7III
 
  • Like
Reactions: entoman

koenkooi

EOS 5D Mark IV
CR Pro
Feb 25, 2015
1,919
1,860
regarding the battery… it may be convenient for obvious reasons, but canon still doesn’t match sony when it comes to battery life. So I’m that respect having the flash draw power out of the camera’s battery is also inconvenient.

battery performance has generally been my main issue with canon. Even in the Nikon vs canon heydays it nikon always did better than canon regarding battery life. Now with MILC it is even more important for canon to actually turn their attention to that and make some major improvements.

I love my R5. But if I am birding and literally waiting for long periods of time for a shot I do worry about battery drainage. That was never really an issue when I was shooting the A7III
Does your shooting situation allow for using a powerbank with a longish cable? The R5 will draw most of its power from USB when it's powered on:
IMG_0002.jpeg
 
  • Like
Reactions: scyrene

entoman

wildlife photography
May 8, 2015
441
479
UK
The R3 but with AF point-linked spot metering. :ROFLMAO:
What I expect in the R1:

35-40MP
Twin CFExpress B slots
“Pro Capture” buffering as per Olympus
New more powerful battery
8K

Body very similar to R3, but with some kind of active cooling.
Performance enhancements across the range.

What I don’t expect:

Higher than 40MP
New “see through” body as per patent.
Global shutter.
 

kaihp

EOS R
CR Pro
Mar 19, 2012
1,014
165
The Most Ancient Kingdom of Denmark
What I expect in the R1:

35-40MP
Twin CFExpress B slots
“Pro Capture” buffering as per Olympus
New more powerful battery
8K

Body very similar to R3, but with some kind of active cooling.
Performance enhancements across the range.

What I don’t expect:

Higher than 40MP
New “see through” body as per patent.
Global shutter.

We could cram in 8K video at just under 40MP if the FF sensor is exactly 7680x5120 (39.3MP). This would give a 7680x4320 16:9 resolution. The slightly larger 8192x4608 8K resolution would push the FF sensor to 44.74MP.

I think the Twin CFexpress B slots would be "obvious", but I'm not Canon.
The "infinite" RAW photo buffer from the 1Dx3 is something I would expect.
Global shutter might come.
I'm not so sure about the more powerful battery, which could be larger.
Gordon Liang showed the R3 filming for 6 hours, so I would expect Canon to have resolved the heat/cooling problems without having to resort to active cooling, even for 8K.
I would expect the GNSS receiver to be quad-constellation (R3 is GPS+GLONASS). I would not expect it to be dual-band (to improve on the position precision) as the current 3-5m resolution is likely to be "good enough" for most photographers and any last precision could be deduced from the image itself.

The see-through body is not something I would expect in a 1-series camera, as the design wastes a lot of space for components and adds a lot of sidewalls (read: dead space).
 

entoman

wildlife photography
May 8, 2015
441
479
UK
We could cram in 8K video at just under 40MP if the FF sensor is exactly 7680x5120 (39.3MP). This would give a 7680x4320 16:9 resolution. The slightly larger 8192x4608 8K resolution would push the FF sensor to 44.74MP.

I think the Twin CFexpress B slots would be "obvious", but I'm not Canon.
The "infinite" RAW photo buffer from the 1Dx3 is something I would expect.
Global shutter might come.
I'm not so sure about the more powerful battery, which could be larger.
Gordon Liang showed the R3 filming for 6 hours, so I would expect Canon to have resolved the heat/cooling problems without having to resort to active cooling, even for 8K.
I would expect the GNSS receiver to be quad-constellation (R3 is GPS+GLONASS). I would not expect it to be dual-band (to improve on the position precision) as the current 3-5m resolution is likely to be "good enough" for most photographers and any last precision could be deduced from the image itself.

The see-through body is not something I would expect in a 1-series camera, as the design wastes a lot of space for components and adds a lot of sidewalls (read: dead space).
At the risk of hi-jacking the thread and turning it into an R1 wish list:

Yes, 45MP is possible, and it would be more versatile regarding 8K options, but I think Canon is more likely to choose 40MP as it would enable faster readout and consequent benefits for AF, burst speeds and buffer.

Global shutter is probably doable, but I don’t think Canon would risk putting such an untried technology into their flagship professional camera. Maybe when the R1 Mk2 arrives. It’s also arguable whether there is any real *need* for global shutter, now that readout times are getting very fast.

I don’t think we’ll see a larger battery, as Canon will want to maintain compatibility with R3 and 1Dxiii, but we’re likely to see a more powerful version, and also high-speed charging.

The single feature that would be by far the biggest deal for me, would be something equivalent to the Olympus Pro Capture. This would be incredibly valuable for wildlife and sports photography, and also probably very desirable for reportage - e.g. to capture that “embarrassing moment” when photographing politicians.

I very much doubt if the specifications of the R1 have even been decided yet by Canon. They’ll have several things in development, and will be watching to see what Nikon and Sony produce next, before committing to a final specification.
 

john1970

EOS R5
CR Pro
Dec 27, 2015
436
524
Northeastern US
What I expect in the R1:

35-40MP
Twin CFExpress B slots
“Pro Capture” buffering as per Olympus
New more powerful battery
8K

Body very similar to R3, but with some kind of active cooling.
Performance enhancements across the range.

What I don’t expect:

Higher than 40MP
New “see through” body as per patent.
Global shutter.
As long as we realize this is pure speculation, my hypothetical R1 features would be:

1) Dual CF Express Type B
2) Infinite buffer similar to 1Dx series
3) Spot metering linked to AF point
4) Quad-bayer sensor so camera has a low res and high res setting
5) Quad pixel AF so camera has X-type sensors in a mirrorless camera
6) global sensor or an exceptionally fast stacked sensor that is 3x faster than R3
7) AF focusing calculations 120 times per a second (2x the R3)
8) A new battery with increased capacity for improved CIPA ratings
9) A new series of processors (Digic XI)
10) A slight increase in maximum fps to 40 fps and user adjustable fps rates in low, high, high+ modes
 
  • Love
Reactions: pj1974

AEWest

EOS RP
Jan 30, 2020
386
484
Overall a nice brochure that summarizes the key features of the camera. With that said, I did not learn anything new by reading it. The R3 looks to be the mirrorless replacement for the 1Dx Mk3, which does make me wonder what the forthcoming R1 will be....
High MP, global shutter.
 

AEWest

EOS RP
Jan 30, 2020
386
484
regarding the battery… it may be convenient for obvious reasons, but canon still doesn’t match sony when it comes to battery life. So I’m that respect having the flash draw power out of the camera’s battery is also inconvenient.

battery performance has generally been my main issue with canon. Even in the Nikon vs canon heydays it nikon always did better than canon regarding battery life. Now with MILC it is even more important for canon to actually turn their attention to that and make some major improvements.

I love my R5. But if I am birding and literally waiting for long periods of time for a shot I do worry about battery drainage. That was never really an issue when I was shooting the A7III
At the risk of sounding old, I used to travel with a vest that had many small pockets for carrying rolls of Kodachrome. Carrying an extra battery is not a deal breaker for me.
 

Ian K

EOS 90D
Jul 20, 2016
102
69
So do my EOS M cameras and one of my PowerShots. But no 1-series bodies do.
Yes but the R5 is the second highest camera Canon make (until the R3 comes out). So it does come in high end bodies. Pretty sure it was also in the 5D Mark IV also.
 

bernie_king

EOS 90D
Jun 30, 2014
115
152
At the risk of hi-jacking the thread and turning it into an R1 wish list:

Yes, 45MP is possible, and it would be more versatile regarding 8K options, but I think Canon is more likely to choose 40MP as it would enable faster readout and consequent benefits for AF, burst speeds and buffer.

Global shutter is probably doable, but I don’t think Canon would risk putting such an untried technology into their flagship professional camera. Maybe when the R1 Mk2 arrives. It’s also arguable whether there is any real *need* for global shutter, now that readout times are getting very fast.

I don’t think we’ll see a larger battery, as Canon will want to maintain compatibility with R3 and 1Dxiii, but we’re likely to see a more powerful version, and also high-speed charging.

The single feature that would be by far the biggest deal for me, would be something equivalent to the Olympus Pro Capture. This would be incredibly valuable for wildlife and sports photography, and also probably very desirable for reportage - e.g. to capture that “embarrassing moment” when photographing politicians.

I very much doubt if the specifications of the R1 have even been decided yet by Canon. They’ll have several things in development, and will be watching to see what Nikon and Sony produce next, before committing to a final specification.
I think they have the R1 specs pretty much baked by now. As far as Sony and Nikon goes, I don't think that's much of a consideration. Canon owns the pro space for the most part and will continue to as long as CPS can provide vastly superior support than the others. Nikon let go most of it's NPS staff and I have yet to hear much about a CPS equivalent for Sony. As far as waiting to see what Sony and Nikon do, you can be sure they already know whats coming for the foreseeable future. I expect a dev announcement at some point before pre-orders of the Z9 start. That gives time for early sales of the R3 and may thwart anyone from buying a Z9 that may otherwise buy an R1.
 

entoman

wildlife photography
May 8, 2015
441
479
UK
I think they have the R1 specs pretty much baked by now. As far as Sony and Nikon goes, I don't think that's much of a consideration. Canon owns the pro space for the most part and will continue to as long as CPS can provide vastly superior support than the others. Nikon let go most of it's NPS staff and I have yet to hear much about a CPS equivalent for Sony. As far as waiting to see what Sony and Nikon do, you can be sure they already know whats coming for the foreseeable future. I expect a dev announcement at some point before pre-orders of the Z9 start. That gives time for early sales of the R3 and may thwart anyone from buying a Z9 that may otherwise buy an R1.
Yes, Canon and Nikon probably have a fair idea what the other is up to, and in terms of *hardware* most of the specs of the R1 will already have been decided, but it will be Canon’s flagship and will be current for at least 3 years, so they’ll want to get it absolutely right.

They know that the Z9 will be released first, and if e.g. the Nikon has “Pro Capture” pre-buffering or some other killer *firmware* feature that Canon hadn’t originally planned to produce, then they are quite likely to delay the launch of the R1 until they’ve got it covered.

I think it’s extremely unlikely that anyone will be choosing between Z9 and R1 - anyone in the market for either of these cameras will already be very heavily committed to their existing brand.

How many pro Nikon users are going to sell all their Nikon bodies and lenses and switch to Canon (and vice versa) for the sake of what would potentially be a very marginal difference in performance?

These are pro cameras, and people who are dependant on photography for a living, demand continuity of controls and don’t want to miss vital shots while learning a new system.
 
  • Like
Reactions: carlosalberto

entoman

wildlife photography
May 8, 2015
441
479
UK
At the risk of sounding old, I used to travel with a vest that had many small pockets for carrying rolls of Kodachrome. Carrying an extra battery is not a deal breaker for me.

Carrying spare batteries is no big deal in terms of weight or space, but there are a couple of things that you need to factor in:

It’s very easy in an intensive shooting situation to fail to notice that a battery is running low, and there’s nothing worse than missing a killer shot when your battery dies just as the action appears in front of you. MUCH better to be safe in the knowledge that a battery will last long enough to cover a full day’s intensive shooting.

Also, if you double or treble the number of (expensive) batteries you take on a job, you also have to double or treble the number of times they need recharging. I have often found myself working in remote locations in the tropics, where facilities to recharge batteries are extremely limited. Often there’s just just a low powered generator and an unreliable fuel supply. And very often there will be other photographers present who need to recharge their own camera batteries - and laptops, smartphones, power packs and other devices.
 
  • Like
Reactions: EOS 4 Life

neuroanatomist

I post too Much on Here!!
CR Pro
Jul 21, 2010
26,064
4,631
I have often found myself working in remote locations in the tropics, where facilities to recharge batteries are extremely limited. Often there’s just just a low powered generator and an unreliable fuel supply.
At lodgings in both Tikal, Guatemala and Ruhengeri, Rwanda I had only ~2 hours of power per day. The lesson is that in such a location, you need a charger for every battery.
 

entoman

wildlife photography
May 8, 2015
441
479
UK
At lodgings in both Tikal, Guatemala and Ruhengeri, Rwanda I had only ~2 hours of power per day. The lesson is that in such a location, you need a charger for every battery.
Yes indeed, I do have a charger for every battery.

At lodges in the Peruvian Amazon there are often a dozen other photographers at each lodge, each wanting to charge a couple of camera batteries, a laptop and a smartphone!

Extra extension leads, multipoint adaptors and dual chargers help to some extent, but the real problem is that the generators just don’t have enough output to cope with it all.

At lodges on the Rio Madre de Dios the situation is even worse, because the fuel has to come in by boat, and there often isn’t much of it.

Offering to pay for extra fuel doesn’t help either, as the boats that bring it in have to carry passengers as well, and can’t be overloaded with extra fuel. Consequently the generators are only run for an hour in the morning and for 2 hours in the evening. There is usually a mad scramble to get to the power outlets before everyone else, resulting in frayed tempers.

The same occurs at lodges in West Papua, Ghana, Tanzania, Bolivia, Russia and many other destinations I visit. Prior to Covid I used DSLRs and it wasn’t such a problem. So I hope Canon and Nikon can catch up with Sony and produce more efficient electronics that don’t use so much battery power.
 
  • Like
Reactions: kaihp

bernie_king

EOS 90D
Jun 30, 2014
115
152
Yes, Canon and Nikon probably have a fair idea what the other is up to, and in terms of *hardware* most of the specs of the R1 will already have been decided, but it will be Canon’s flagship and will be current for at least 3 years, so they’ll want to get it absolutely right.

They know that the Z9 will be released first, and if e.g. the Nikon has “Pro Capture” pre-buffering or some other killer *firmware* feature that Canon hadn’t originally planned to produce, then they are quite likely to delay the launch of the R1 until they’ve got it covered.

I think it’s extremely unlikely that anyone will be choosing between Z9 and R1 - anyone in the market for either of these cameras will already be very heavily committed to their existing brand.

How many pro Nikon users are going to sell all their Nikon bodies and lenses and switch to Canon (and vice versa) for the sake of what would potentially be a very marginal difference in performance?

These are pro cameras, and people who are dependant on photography for a living, demand continuity of controls and don’t want to miss vital shots while learning a new system.
As someone who's worked in software development for almost 30 years, I can tell you that the requirements were written for this camera for the software together with the hardware. Granted, small changes are possible within reason, but Canon will be fighting tooth and nail not to allow scope creep for any reason, including something that Nikon will be doing (although I doubt it's much of a consideration). While I agree that professionals that shoot Canon are unlikely to move to Nikon, I can't say I believe that is true for Nikon. Given that Nikon has let go the majority of the NPS staff, I would imagine that people who rely on that support are looking for a new home. Not all, but many. The value of CPS exceeds any small feature that may or may not be available on the R1 in comparison to a Z9 or the A1 for someone who does photography for a living. I think there are Nikon shooters that may upgrade to a Z9 , but I think the real competition for Canon is for where those users will land long term and they don't want it to be with Sony.
 
  • Like
Reactions: EOS 4 Life

AlanF

Stay at home
CR Pro
Aug 16, 2012
8,859
12,123
At lodgings in both Tikal, Guatemala and Ruhengeri, Rwanda I had only ~2 hours of power per day. The lesson is that in such a location, you need a charger for every battery.
Yes indeed, I do have a charger for every battery.

At lodges in the Peruvian Amazon there are often a dozen other photographers at each lodge, each wanting to charge a couple of camera batteries, a laptop and a smartphone!

Extra extension leads, multipoint adaptors and dual chargers help to some extent, but the real problem is that the generators just don’t have enough output to cope with it all.

At lodges on the Rio Madre de Dios the situation is even worse, because the fuel has to come in by boat, and there often isn’t much of it.

Offering to pay for extra fuel doesn’t help either, as the boats that bring it in have to carry passengers as well, and can’t be overloaded with extra fuel. Consequently the generators are only run for an hour in the morning and for 2 hours in the evening. There is usually a mad scramble to get to the power outlets before everyone else, resulting in frayed tempers.

The same occurs at lodges in West Papua, Ghana, Tanzania, Bolivia, Russia and many other destinations I visit. Prior to Covid I used DSLRs and it wasn’t such a problem. So I hope Canon and Nikon can catch up with Sony and produce more efficient electronics that don’t use so much battery power.
We should have been in charge of the planning for the current shortages - I have a drawer full of leads, multi-adaptors for different types of sockets and plugs, and redundancy of chargers. In case I ever get the chance of safe travel to far locations again, I think I will hang on to my favourite DSLR that gets several thousand shots on a standard battery and far more from the larger in a grip (which has two slots in charger for the big boys). It's gathering dust but I use it occasionally to remind me its not far off the R5 for AF, and I top up the batteries to keep them in shape.
 
  • Like
Reactions: entoman