Canon officially announces the PowerShot V10 and launch of the PowerShot V camera series

Canon Rumors Guy

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MELVILLE, NY, May 11, 2023 – If you’ve picked up your smartphone in the last few minutes, chances are you’ve viewed a video via a social media platform. From the YPulse 2023 Social Media Behavior Report, 59% of Gen Y/Z say they create their own social media content for a broader audience than just their friends and

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Sep 20, 2020
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The SmallRig Cage Kit is pretty cool.
 
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The biggest selling compact camera is the Fuji x100v. The series has been great for Fuji, with many x100 users adding a Fuji MILC when they decide they need one. I know Canon wants to get the vlogging market but there is still untapped potential in small viewfinder cameras as illustrated by the success of the x100v and resurgence of film cameras, also with young people.

To date, Canon's Powershots do not compete imo. The closest they came was the G1xiii, but you could say it is too big for a compact, not much smaller than the R50 (or older M50) although it does have a useful built-in (leaf-shutter improved) flash.

If you want a genuinely small pocket APS-C camera, you have to choose a Ricoh GRII (with flash) or a III/IIIx without flash. Your next best choice is the 1inch sensor Sony RX100 VI or VII, which both have pop-up viewfinders, and are a bit too heavy versus the Ricohs at around 300g.

The alternatives from Canon are just not that attractive for real photographers. The G5xii is even heavier at 340g, and has a clunky evf. The G7xiii and G9xii are brilliantly sized for the pocket, but as they lack an EVF there is no good reason (at least for me) to use them over a decent smartphone.

Please Canon, make a G5xiii, G7x4 or g9x3 with a prime 35mm lens, 1 inch or APS-C sensor, good controls and a fixed, lovely-to-use EVF. Shrink the rear LCD. Steal x100 and Ricoh GR market share and work to meet the needs of the post-smart-phone pocket camera market which has untapped potential with people wanting better than a phone but not wanting massive equipment all the time. There has been a resurgence in film cameras for young people. They have a viewfinder and no screen. It's so frustrating that there is no mini x100 on the market with a viewfinder...

If Ricoh brings out a GRiii x with an EVF, I would carry it over an iphone or Fuji x100...
 
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Jun 27, 2013
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Almost perfect.
It uses CDAF.
Must be a Sony sensor.
It also lacks the Product Demo mode that the R50 and R8 have.
As someone pointed out its probably a Canon sensor already in use with their camcoder.
One downside to this camera compared to their old Vixia Mini is lack of removable battery. Also it seems to undercut competing Sony ZV camera while having a wider lens.
 
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Sep 20, 2020
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As someone pointed out its probably a Canon sensor already in use with their camcoder.
One downside to this camera compared to their old Vixia Mini is lack of removable battery. Also it seems to undercut competing Sony ZV camera while having a wider lens.
The Canon sensors that I am aware of either use PDAF or hybrid AF which is why I am assuming it is a Sony.
It is suspiciously similar to the ZV-1F.
I don't really care who makes the sensor.
I really only care about the autofocus.
 
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jam05

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The biggest selling compact camera is the Fuji x100v. The series has been great for Fuji, with many x100 users adding a Fuji MILC when they decide they need one. I know Canon wants to get the vlogging market but there is still untapped potential in small viewfinder cameras as illustrated by the success of the x100v and resurgence of film cameras, also with young people.

To date, Canon's Powershots do not compete imo. The closest they came was the G1xiii, but you could say it is too big for a compact, not much smaller than the R50 (or older M50) although it does have a useful built-in (leaf-shutter improved) flash.

If you want a genuinely small pocket APS-C camera, you have to choose a Ricoh GRII (with flash) or a III/IIIx without flash. Your next best choice is the 1inch sensor Sony RX100 VI or VII, which both have pop-up viewfinders, and are a bit too heavy versus the Ricohs at around 300g.

The alternatives from Canon are just not that attractive for real photographers. The G5xii is even heavier at 340g, and has a clunky evf. The G7xiii and G9xii are brilliantly sized for the pocket, but as they lack an EVF there is no good reason (at least for me) to use them over a decent smartphone.

Please Canon, make a G5xiii, G7x4 or g9x3 with a prime 35mm lens, 1 inch or APS-C sensor, good controls and a fixed, lovely-to-use EVF. Shrink the rear LCD. Steal x100 and Ricoh GR market share and work to meet the needs of the post-smart-phone pocket camera market which has untapped potential with people wanting better than a phone but not wanting massive equipment all the time. There has been a resurgence in film cameras for young people. They have a viewfinder and no screen. It's so frustrating that there is no mini x100 on the market with a viewfinder...

If Ricoh brings out a GRiii x with an EVF, I would carry it over an iphone or Fuji x100...
 
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Sep 17, 2014
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The biggest selling compact camera is the Fuji x100v. The series has been great for Fuji, with many x100 users adding a Fuji MILC when they decide they need one. I know Canon wants to get the vlogging market but there is still untapped potential in small viewfinder cameras as illustrated by the success of the x100v and resurgence of film cameras, also with young people.

To date, Canon's Powershots do not compete imo. The closest they came was the G1xiii, but you could say it is too big for a compact, not much smaller than the R50 (or older M50) although it does have a useful built-in (leaf-shutter improved) flash.

If you want a genuinely small pocket APS-C camera, you have to choose a Ricoh GRII (with flash) or a III/IIIx without flash. Your next best choice is the 1inch sensor Sony RX100 VI or VII, which both have pop-up viewfinders, and are a bit too heavy versus the Ricohs at around 300g.

The alternatives from Canon are just not that attractive for real photographers. The G5xii is even heavier at 340g, and has a clunky evf. The G7xiii and G9xii are brilliantly sized for the pocket, but as they lack an EVF there is no good reason (at least for me) to use them over a decent smartphone.

Please Canon, make a G5xiii, G7x4 or g9x3 with a prime 35mm lens, 1 inch or APS-C sensor, good controls and a fixed, lovely-to-use EVF. Shrink the rear LCD. Steal x100 and Ricoh GR market share and work to meet the needs of the post-smart-phone pocket camera market which has untapped potential with people wanting better than a phone but not wanting massive equipment all the time. There has been a resurgence in film cameras for young people. They have a viewfinder and no screen. It's so frustrating that there is no mini x100 on the market with a viewfinder...

If Ricoh brings out a GRiii x with an EVF, I would carry it over an iphone or Fuji x100...

The biggest appeal of a dedicated camera, apart from a larger sensor is the zoom lens. I would never buy a fixed lens 35mm camera.
 
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May 4, 2022
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The biggest selling compact camera is the Fuji x100v. The series has been great for Fuji, with many x100 users adding a Fuji MILC when they decide they need one. I know Canon wants to get the vlogging market but there is still untapped potential in small viewfinder cameras as illustrated by the success of the x100v and resurgence of film cameras, also with young people.

To date, Canon's Powershots do not compete imo. The closest they came was the G1xiii, but you could say it is too big for a compact, not much smaller than the R50 (or older M50) although it does have a useful built-in (leaf-shutter improved) flash.

If you want a genuinely small pocket APS-C camera, you have to choose a Ricoh GRII (with flash) or a III/IIIx without flash. Your next best choice is the 1inch sensor Sony RX100 VI or VII, which both have pop-up viewfinders, and are a bit too heavy versus the Ricohs at around 300g.

The alternatives from Canon are just not that attractive for real photographers. The G5xii is even heavier at 340g, and has a clunky evf. The G7xiii and G9xii are brilliantly sized for the pocket, but as they lack an EVF there is no good reason (at least for me) to use them over a decent smartphone.

Please Canon, make a G5xiii, G7x4 or g9x3 with a prime 35mm lens, 1 inch or APS-C sensor, good controls and a fixed, lovely-to-use EVF. Shrink the rear LCD. Steal x100 and Ricoh GR market share and work to meet the needs of the post-smart-phone pocket camera market which has untapped potential with people wanting better than a phone but not wanting massive equipment all the time. There has been a resurgence in film cameras for young people. They have a viewfinder and no screen. It's so frustrating that there is no mini x100 on the market with a viewfinder...

If Ricoh brings out a GRiii x with an EVF, I would carry it over an iphone or Fuji x100...
Why are you ranting about photography and flashes? Did you take in any of the details of this product at all?
 
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Jun 27, 2013
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The Canon sensors that I am aware of either use PDAF or hybrid AF which is why I am assuming it is a Sony.
It is suspiciously similar to the ZV-1F.
I don't really care who makes the sensor.
I really only care about the autofocus.
Sony 1" sensors seem to be stacked and if it was a stacked sensor Canon marketing would have mentioned about it.
 
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Jul 21, 2010
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Sony 1" sensors seem to be stacked and if it was a stacked sensor Canon marketing would have mentioned about it.
Why would they have mentioned it? How would a stacked sensor help for this application, such that it should be highlighted?

@EOS 4 Life mentions similarity to the Sony ZV-E1, which has a stacked sensor. But Sony doesn't mention that fact on their product page.


They say, "Large 1” sensor and F2 lens, for low-light and defocusing backgrounds," and in the specifications, "1.0-type (13.2 mm x 8.8 mm) Exmor RS CMOS sensor, aspect ratio 3:2." I had to Google 'Exmor RS CMOS sensor' to find out it is a stacked sensor.
 
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Jul 21, 2010
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I wish they\'d move away from the idea of on-board batteries.
It may be unwarranted, but I\'m always concerned that the Li-Ion pack\'s going to blow out and I won\'t be able to install a new one.
Or that one full charge won’t last long enough.

I bought a fluoro dive light recently, and one major reason I went with SeaLife over Sola is the former uses swappable batteries while the latter has an onboard battery. I can swap batteries between an evening and a night dive, instead of needing to bring a power bank on the boat and hope it can add enough power during the surface interval.
 
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koenkooi

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Feb 25, 2015
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I wish they\'d move away from the idea of on-board batteries.
It may be unwarranted, but I\'m always concerned that the Li-Ion pack\'s going to blow out and I won\'t be able to install a new one.
I’m not so concerned about it blowing out as for it aging and turning into e-waste after a year.

Built-in batteries are fine as long as they are user replaceable.
 
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Dragon

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The video in the beta reviews looks pretty decent even with the enhanced digital IS. Looks like Canon is downsampling and interpolating from a 5k starting point. The processing power is finally there do do that and it will make much better video than random line skipping. Final samples needed to be sure, but initial quality looks pretty good. It should be remembered that the US is not the only (or likely even the primary) market for this little camera. This looks like the best "new concept" power shot so far. I am not fond of the built-in battery, but if it is user-replaceable, then not too big a hit. The size advantage of built-in batteries is that they can have weird form factors and thus make the device smaller for the same amount of power as a removable battery.
 
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