Canon Unveils New Binoculars Featuring Enhanced Image Stabilization Technologies

Lee Jay

EOS 7D Mark II
Sep 22, 2011
2,207
144
Re: AFAIK the 10x42 IS L binos are still being made by Canon

JimS said:
Lee Jay wrote:

My 10x42L IS binoculars are the most useful and amazing piece of optics I've ever owned or used. I got them used (and a spectacular deal) but if you don't do that, they are really expensive. I was surprised when they were discontinued and am surprised now that they don't have a direct replacement.

the 10x42L IS binos are still shown on Canon's U.S. website. What led you to conclude that Canon has discontinued them?

https://www.usa.canon.com/internet/portal/us/home/products/details/binoculars/is-binoculars/10-x-42-l-is-wp

When I looked, they had disappeared from Canon's website and were listed as unavailable from both B&H and Adorama. Maybe there was some sort of short term supply problem.
 

docsmith

EOS R
CR Pro
Sep 17, 2010
1,075
534
This is both an observation and a question for those that likely know better than I do. But I was thinking about these newly released binoculars. In Canon's lineup, I figured that they were sacrificing light gathering ability for the benefit of size and weight.

But, as I've thought about astro more, one thing I read is that light gathering is great for faint stars/galaxies, etc, but for things that are already relatively bright, the lack of light gathering ability helps with contrast and keeps the sky black and accentuates the brighter stars. If true, for a lot of astro, these binoculars might be very good. So, Canon might actually be targeting not only those that want magnification, size and weight, but maybe also astro?

Thoughts?
 
docsmith said:
This is both an observation and a question for those that likely know better than I do. But I was thinking about these newly released binoculars. In Canon's lineup, I figured that they were sacrificing light gathering ability for the benefit of size and weight.

But, as I've thought about astro more, one thing I read is that light gathering is great for faint stars/galaxies, etc, but for things that are already relatively bright, the lack of light gathering ability helps with contrast and keeps the sky black and accentuates the brighter stars. If true, for a lot of astro, these binoculars might be very good. So, Canon might actually be targeting not only those that want magnification, size and weight, but maybe also astro?

Thoughts?

nope.. I'd always want maximum brightness.. for oldies (I'm starting to get that way) eyes will no longer dilate so much as the kids, so an exit pupil of say 6mm can be fine, which means 8x50 rather than 7x50, but too much magnification means you just see a sea of dots wobbling before your eyes.. back off a little and you can recognise patterns you can see with the naked eye, but with far more detail going on between the dots, and bigger aperture means more detail going on, so you might as well go all the way to the maximum and get 7x50 or 10x70 or similar.

If you want higher magnification, get a telescope... or even one of these:

https://www.vixenoptics.com/Vixen-Bt-126-Binocular-Telescope-p/14306.htm