EOS R3 eye-focus training: do it at least 10 times/rotation

I spoke to a Canon representative this Tuesday regarding a couple of questions regarding my R3 (he was at a pro dealer demonstrating RF lenses), and he told me that you need to train the eye-focus system at least 10-11 times in each orientation before it becomes really reliable :oops:

I don't recall seeing that mentioned in the user manual, so wanted to pass this info along to y'all.
I'm off to delete all the trainings and redoing them to see what if any difference it makes.
 
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Jun 25, 2012
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I've done the training a bunch of times, all in different lighting situations, and I am happy to report that the Eye Control AF is very accurate for me. I'm easily able to use it for selecting between different subjects, like a bunch of birds grouped together, and I can even use it for some bird-in-flight-shots on larger more slow flying birds.

I love Eye Control AF. I will be really disappointed if Canon doesn't include this feature on future models, like the R1.
 
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koenkooi

CR Pro
Feb 25, 2015
3,609
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The Netherlands
I've done the training a bunch of times, all in different lighting situations, and I am happy to report that the Eye Control AF is very accurate for me. I'm easily able to use it for selecting between different subjects, like a bunch of birds grouped together, and I can even use it for some bird-in-flight-shots on larger more slow flying birds.

I love Eye Control AF. I will be really disappointed if Canon doesn't include this feature on future models, like the R1.
I’m curious if they’ll offer it for cameras below the 1 and 3 series. If they do, I hope they’ll also offer it on their removable EVFs.
 
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AlanF

Desperately seeking birds
CR Pro
Aug 16, 2012
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I've done the training a bunch of times, all in different lighting situations, and I am happy to report that the Eye Control AF is very accurate for me. I'm easily able to use it for selecting between different subjects, like a bunch of birds grouped together, and I can even use it for some bird-in-flight-shots on larger more slow flying birds.

I love Eye Control AF. I will be really disappointed if Canon doesn't include this feature on future models, like the R1.
Why do you need Eye Control for slow, large flying birds? They are the easiest things to AF on any camera, and tracking on the R5 picks them up virtually instantaneously if the camera is just pointed in the right direction.
 
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Jun 25, 2012
806
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Why do you need Eye Control for slow, large flying birds? They are the easiest things to AF on any camera, and tracking on the R5 picks them up virtually instantaneously if the camera is just pointed in the right direction.
If Eye Control is already on while I’m capturing stationary birds and one of them suddenly takes off, it takes too much time to toggle Eye Control off. Therefore, being able to accurately keep up with the bird is useful.
 
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AlanF

Desperately seeking birds
CR Pro
Aug 16, 2012
12,406
22,746
If Eye Control is already on while I’m capturing stationary birds and one of them suddenly takes off, it takes too much time to toggle Eye Control off. Therefore, being able to accurately keep up with the bird is useful.
Is Eye Control an advantage on photographing perched large birds? I’ve no idea as I have never had the opportunity of trying it.
 
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I am happy to report that the Eye Control AF is very accurate for me.
Even after going through 10+ calibration rounds (horizontal + vertical), the focus point isn't spot-on where I'm looking (it's a bit up and to the left RN). This is the calibration without glasses and contact lenses. I found with the FW 1.2.1 I must not poke my eye too far into the EVF as it then cannot 'see' where my eye is looking - but if I don't do that, I can't see the full EVF.

Still need to redo the calibration with contact lenses on as this scenario is probably my most common way for me to use the R3.
 
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I have found that the eye-focus control in R3 can be useful for larger objects with respect to the whole scene, to allow for error in positioning the focus point. I have found it rather useless for smaller birds in a larger scene. Multiple training does not help that much when wearing glasses and specially bi-focal ones. I hope that the technology will catch up in later versions.
 
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becceric

Making clumsy photographic mistakes since 1980
CR Pro
Oct 30, 2016
419
753
I have found that the eye-focus control in R3 can be useful for larger objects with respect to the whole scene, to allow for error in positioning the focus point. I have found it rather useless for smaller birds in a larger scene. Multiple training does not help that much when wearing glasses and specially bi-focal ones. I hope that the technology will catch up in later versions.
I’m hoping to read of future improvements also. My last experience with this feature was on the old Elan IIe. While I’m sure the current implementation is vastly improved, my nearsighted vision (corrected with eyeglasses) will patiently wait.
 
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I spoke to a Canon representative this Tuesday regarding a couple of questions regarding my R3 (he was at a pro dealer demonstrating RF lenses), and he told me that you need to train the eye-focus system at least 10-11 times in each orientation before it becomes really reliable :oops:

I don't recall seeing that mentioned in the user manual, so wanted to pass this info along to y'all.
I'm off to delete all the trainings and redoing them to see what if any difference it makes.
cargo culting at its finest
 
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Jun 25, 2012
806
173
Canada
Is Eye Control an advantage on photographing perched large birds? I’ve no idea as I have never had the opportunity of trying it.

I find it extremely advantageous for such situations. If there are, say, two or three perched birds sitting on a branch, I can use Eye Control AF to quickly focus on each of them without moving my hands or the camera. In other words, I can keep my framing and quickly choose my subject(s) without having to move a muscle.
 
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Jul 21, 2010
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I find it extremely advantageous for such situations. If there are, say, two or three perched birds sitting on a branch, I can use Eye Control AF to quickly focus on each of them without moving my hands or the camera. In other words, I can keep my framing and quickly choose my subject(s) without having to move a muscle.
Except some of your six extraocular muscles.

1664296446669.png

/pedantry :p
 
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Dreysi

Canon R3, Sony A7s
Jul 7, 2016
32
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I spoke to a Canon representative this Tuesday regarding a couple of questions regarding my R3 (he was at a pro dealer demonstrating RF lenses), and he told me that you need to train the eye-focus system at least 10-11 times in each orientation before it becomes really reliable :oops:

I don't recall seeing that mentioned in the user manual, so wanted to pass this info along to y'all.
I'm off to delete all the trainings and redoing them to see what if any difference it makes.
Thanks I had given up on it and just use the fancy (and wonderful) control pad thingy on the back. Will try again due to this.
 
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