Fashion Runway Shots

John.Nacion

EOS M6 Mark II
Aug 31, 2014
54
0
Re: NY Fashion Week (Lincoln Center & Off Sites)

As a newbie runway shooter I would appreciate some critiques. Thanks.
 
Re: NY Fashion Week (Lincoln Center & Off Sites)

It's been a number of years since I've shot runway, but I'll give you my thoughts. I want to start by saying that they are all very nice shots that are sharp and well-exposed so what follows is just nitpicking but are the little things that can make your work better.

The first thing to remember is that you are shooting the clothes, not the person. I realize that's obvious, but several editors and worse, designers, used to get on me about this. The reason I bring this up is that a lot of them take a big issue with having any eye contact with the model in the photo. In any other photo, that would be desired, but they feel it takes away from the focus on their clothes. I see that in a couple of your shots and while it's unavoidable in many cases, just be aware that many, but not all, will not like that. A few clients were angry when I didn't get the eye contact...so I just started trying to get both looks if I wasn't sure or getting the "right" one if I knew in advance.

In that same vein, getting the position of the limbs and the pose (at the end of the runway) right is critical. If you don't time the walk right, it doesn't look natural or worse, makes the clothes look bad. The end of the runway pose is a tough shot if the model doesn't hit it right or you don't time it right. Practice is all it takes and sometimes it helps to watch shows you're not shooting without a camera so you can get a better idea of the timing.

Speaking of body parts, try to make sure they are visible. In that first shot, the hand is hidden and while that's not a big thing, it takes a bit away from a photo that is very nice otherwise.

Also, I would try to leave a little more space around the person in the frame, assuming you're using a zoom. Some of the shots are a bit tight, or perhaps are cropped a bit tight.

Finally, I would like to say that the lighting is very nice and you've done well with the exposure. If you end up at a show where you need a flash, the trick I liked to use was to crank up my flash a bit so that the model would be close to overexposed. In post, I'd dial down the exposure which would turn the background much darker, helping to eliminate distractions in the frame.

So I would summarize by saving that you're off to a great start with your work and just need more practice and time to refine your technique. Thanks for sharing and hopefully some of the people who are more involved in this work these days will chime in as well.
 

John.Nacion

EOS M6 Mark II
Aug 31, 2014
54
0
Re: NY Fashion Week (Lincoln Center & Off Sites)

mackguyver said:
It's been a number of years since I've shot runway, but I'll give you my thoughts. I want to start by saying that they are all very nice shots that are sharp and well-exposed so what follows is just nitpicking but are the little things that can make your work better.

The first thing to remember is that you are shooting the clothes, not the person. I realize that's obvious, but several editors and worse, designers, used to get on me about this. The reason I bring this up is that a lot of them take a big issue with having any eye contact with the model in the photo. In any other photo, that would be desired, but they feel it takes away from the focus on their clothes. I see that in a couple of your shots and while it's unavoidable in many cases, just be aware that many, but not all, will not like that. A few clients were angry when I didn't get the eye contact...so I just started trying to get both looks if I wasn't sure or getting the "right" one if I knew in advance.

In that same vein, getting the position of the limbs and the pose (at the end of the runway) right is critical. If you don't time the walk right, it doesn't look natural or worse, makes the clothes look bad. The end of the runway pose is a tough shot if the model doesn't hit it right or you don't time it right. Practice is all it takes and sometimes it helps to watch shows you're not shooting without a camera so you can get a better idea of the timing.

Speaking of body parts, try to make sure they are visible. In that first shot, the hand is hidden and while that's not a big thing, it takes a bit away from a photo that is very nice otherwise.

Also, I would try to leave a little more space around the person in the frame, assuming you're using a zoom. Some of the shots are a bit tight, or perhaps are cropped a bit tight.

Finally, I would like to say that the lighting is very nice and you've done well with the exposure. If you end up at a show where you need a flash, the trick I liked to use was to crank up my flash a bit so that the model would be close to overexposed. In post, I'd dial down the exposure which would turn the background much darker, helping to eliminate distractions in the frame.

So I would summarize by saving that you're off to a great start with your work and just need more practice and time to refine your technique. Thanks for sharing and hopefully some of the people who are more involved in this work these days will chime in as well.
Awesome! Thank you so much for this very informative critique!
 

nc0b

5DsR
Dec 3, 2013
250
5
73
Colorado
I realize this this thread is about technique, and the one critique was interesting. One the other hand, does anyone really buy these ridiculous outfits? Are the designers trying to see who can be the most absurd? I guess they are laughing all the way to the bank, but give me a break. I thought clothes were supposed to enhance a person's physical attributes, not be a spectacle that overshadows the man or woman.
 

John.Nacion

EOS M6 Mark II
Aug 31, 2014
54
0
nc0b said:
I realize this this thread is about technique, and the one critique was interesting. One the other hand, does anyone really buy these ridiculous outfits? Are the designers trying to see who can be the most absurd? I guess they are laughing all the way to the bank, but give me a break. I thought clothes were supposed to enhance a person's physical attributes, not be a spectacle that overshadows the man or woman.
Good point, Ncob.

UCOF Gala-Malan Breton-5574 by johnnacionphotography, on Flickr


UCOF Gala-Malan Breton-5712 by johnnacionphotography, on Flickr


UCOF Gala-Malan Breton-5632 by johnnacionphotography, on Flickr